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  1. #21
    Senior Member realunlucky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pods8 View Post
    Good to know. Like I said I tend to over think stuff like this and hence my tent project sits off to the side.
    Like I've said whatever it takes for piece of mind is worth the work in the end.

    I have read where plenty of people have built tarps for hamacks using only silicone to glue silnylon seams together with no stitching at all without any reported failures. I prefer a touch more insurance myself for anything I didn't consider light duty.

    Sorry for the slight thread derail


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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by realunlucky View Post
    Like I've said whatever it takes for piece of mind is worth the work in the end.

    I have read where plenty of people have built tarps for hamacks using only silicone to glue silnylon seams together with no stitching at all without any reported failures. I prefer a touch more insurance myself for anything I didn't consider light duty.

    Sorry for the slight thread derail

    Not at all. These are the good type of tangents that I appreciate about a number of my favorite threads out there. Seeing how some folks do stuff and what works is great information to be shared.


    Jeremy

  4. #23
    Member Flydaho's Avatar
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    gudspelr - your shelter is looking great! Can't wait to see it when it's complete. I'm jealous that they didn't have the XL fabric in stock when i built my shelter as the 11'x11' footprint would be a palace!

    One suggestion I do have (by looking at the picture of your seam) is to increase the stitch length. It looks like you are at the lower end of the stitch length (stitches per inch or SPI) setting on your machine. When doing research on tent making, I found that you want to be in the ballpark of 8-10 stitches per inch. I pulled out my Hilleberg Nammataj and Cabela's Alaskan Guide tents to see what they used, and it was more around 6-8 stitches per inch. I maxed out my machine at this 6 - 8 SPI mark and it worked great. You can use the grid pattern on the material to help keep track of the SPI, but it will vary because the material doesn't like to feed at a consistent pace the entire time. Also, check thread tension as i see your stitches are angled (which is nearly unavoidable when sewing such thin material, but it doesn't hurt to try and eliminate it). It's looking great and please keep us updated on your build!

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  6. #24
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    Flydaho-
    I feel fortunate that they now have the wider Silpoly. Wanting enough room for comfort with a few kids, gear, and a stove was high on the list of "wants". And thanks for the information on stitch length-I had no idea what the standard was. My machine is fairly old (1950's) and I have the length maxed out. I grabbed a ruler and it appears there's 8 stitches in the inch I measured. Though, like you mentioned, it is difficult to keep everything super consistent because of the material feeding through... It's challenging, but I'm looking forward to having a cool tent at the end .


    Jeremy

  7. #25
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    So, I got some more done tonight. I rolled the seams on two of the panels and got them stitched, ran out of oomph before getting the third wall done. For clarification, here's a picture that illustrates the seam I had used. It's at the bottom labeled French/flat felled hybrid:




    You can see where it would leave those holes you can see through on one side... It may have been just fine, but I like how it ended up:




    Also, I rolled up one of the walls and put it on a food scale we had in the kitchen. It's a dial type, so maybe not super accurate, but it weighed 8.5 oz. The idea of having this big of a shelter that may come in under 4 lbs (hopefully) is making me feel pretty happy. I managed to make my mind up on vents and stove jack placement, too. I think there will be two vents, one on the left and right panels and the stove jack will go on the back wall.

    After I get the third wall finished up, I'll get the zipper cut and sewn in.

    Jeremy
    Last edited by gudspelr; 6 Days Ago at 08:27 PM.

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  9. #26
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    ^ very cool. I'm super excited about the progress you have made. What are your plans for the bug netting?


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  10. #27
    Senior Member 530Chukar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pods8 View Post
    Only thing that concerns me is the seam style on the thin material, but perhaps its an unfounded concern. With that style seam the one side of stitching has no layers of material underneath it so when tension is applied to the seam and the stitching holes open up a bit (which they do on that stuff) you can see daylight through them. Not sure if seam sealer addresses that issue fully? It otherwise is a more convenient seam to sew on that slippery stuff that's for sure. William are you using that seam style or are you folding/pinning to get both stitch lines on stacked material?
    I built the same tent about a month ago with the Silpoly XL. I noticed a huge difference in the amount of stretch between silpoly and silnylon. Using the flat felled seams with the Silpoly I was not able to see light through the stitches as I could with the silnylon. It spent a few days in the Black Rock Desert this last weeks and sounds like it held up very well to the winds.

    I think I was able to do mine with an 8ft ceiling at 14 yards of fabric. All said and done was around $250. I could see it being quite a bit cheaper using 2nds.




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  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeroforhire View Post
    ^ very cool. I'm super excited about the progress you have made. What are your plans for the bug netting?
    I bought some noseeum netting and plan on making little triangular shaped panels to sew up at the peak. The plan is to basically do it like is outlined in the Bearpaw Wilderness video I mentioned-sew to the inside, cut out the Silpoly, then fold the excess Silpoly and stitch again, through the layers. Hopefully it will leave a nice clean look-we'll see how it actually goes when it comes time...

    Jeremy

  12. #29
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    Chukar, thanks for the info. It also reminded me to go look at the invoice of materials I ordered.

    .67 oz noseeum mesh, qty 2, $8.50
    1.1 oz Silpoly XL 2nds (foliage green), qty 16, $95.20
    420D Robic ripstop nylon, qty 1, $6.00
    Stove jack material, qty 1, $15.00
    #8 YKK coil zipper, qty 10, $5.50
    YKK coil slider-standard, #8 /Double, qty 2, $1.40
    Gutterman Mara 70 thread, $3.60 per roll (I got three, not wanting to run out-there's no chance I will, there's a lot...)
    Add in some grosgrain ribbon of various widths that you want for tie out/stake down points and away you go. That's not added in, but the rest is $135.20. And the grosgrain is only $3.75 or so per yard depending on the width you get. Plus, I have plenty of extra Silpoly, so if I'm not counting my time, I feel like it's money well spent. I'll also need to add in a center pole to the cost, which will likely be a decent chunk since I want to go the carbon fiber route from Ruta Locura...

    I got the double pulls for the zipper so I could grab them from inside or outside the tent easily and I wanted two so I could unzip it from the top for more venting if I really wanted to. As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I got some other peak reinforcing material along with the 420. It was HyperD 300 diamond ripstop. It was $4.65, so not exactly breaking the bank if I didn't use it. I think I'm going to go with the 420...but not completely sure.


    Jeremy

  13. #30
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    Perfect. Thanks for the shopping list.


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