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  1. #21
    Senior Member Kevin Dill's Avatar
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    If you bring block and tackle (I call it a pulley system) be sure your rope is sufficiently stout. It takes a substantial amount of linear pull/poundage to break friction and then move a bulky moose uphill out of water, or pull him out of a bad spot. My 2016 bull came within 6' of rolling into a narrow little gulch about 4' deep and 6' wide. If he had ended up in there I would have worked double-hard to butcher him alone. I doubt I could have pulled him out of there by myself even with dyneema rope and a 4-way set of pulleys.

    Harry Callahan: "A man's gotta know his limitations". Dirty Harry must have been a moose hunter, because that is perfect advice. I admit I'm getting more and more about responsible moose killing as I age. Gone is the need to march into Hell and kill the biggest moose I can find...then navigate him out of there regardless of personal suffering, injury or hardship. You can't control an injured moose of course. You can control how far you'll go to kill one and what kind of terrain you'll hunt in...given the limitations of having only your legs and backs for recovery. Moose and water are like peas and carrots...they go together. Still, I don't have a lot of interest in chasing moose in extremely wet settings where it seems like high odds a dead moose will find a watery grave.

    I also think a most basic strategy for the guys who must backpack out all their meat (in a tough setting) is to go with more bags of meat weighing less per bag. I usually end up with 10 bags of meat but 12 might be better if the distance is far...intervening terrain is bad...or the packer just has physical issues to consider. Age is a physical issue by the way, lol.

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  3. #22
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    Kevin...exactly!

  4. #23
    Senior Member Ray's Avatar
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    Now that I am and "old man" and half crippled it seems, Kevin has it right. Small pieces and enough equipment to create a variety of options to move heavy dense objects.

    Learn how to set up a "z-drag" system used in the rafting community to get stuck boats off rocks, etc.

    Small metal pulley systems from the sail boat or climbing community. Lighter and stronger than what you can get from the hardware store.

    dynema ropes, string even, will help out a great deal.

    And if your transport system allows for the weight a rope-a-long with 100' of blue steel rope, a ATV recovery snatch block and one or two 1.5"x4' sewn slings. These are always on the boat, ATV or truck as part of the vehicle recovery gear anyway, but will yank a moose just as well and is portable.

  5. #24
    Senior Member Beendare's Avatar
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    I still want to know how it turned out for Larry with the sleds on that hunt....hoping he chimes in on that.

    Those mtns were still a long ways off- grin
    “It takes no more time to see the good side of life than to see the bad.” ― Jimmy Buffett

    "You don't drown by falling in the water; you drown by staying there.” ― Edwin Louis Cole

  6. #25
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    I like to take a kids inflatable raft of tube... the kind that is on clearance in September for ~$4 and you blow up with your mouth. They are great for pulling a bagged quarter if they location you're in makes sense to do so. Cringing to say this, but never had one get punctured... knock on wood. Just walk in calf/knee high water around the lake and you're good. I'm sure it will get popped on day one now.

  7. #26
    Senior Member Beendare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJH View Post
    I like to take a kids inflatable raft of tube... the kind that is on clearance in September for ~$4 and you blow up with your mouth. They are great for pulling a bagged quarter if they location you're in makes sense to do so. Cringing to say this, but never had one get punctured... knock on wood. Just walk in calf/knee high water around the lake and you're good. I'm sure it will get popped on day one now.
    Good idea. It would be easy to sew a silnylon cover for that...with a drag rope tie out. I might just do that....
    “It takes no more time to see the good side of life than to see the bad.” ― Jimmy Buffett

    "You don't drown by falling in the water; you drown by staying there.” ― Edwin Louis Cole

  8. #27
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    The whole highlighted hunt is on youtube. Didn't kill anything but time, but saw a lot of animals...caribou and griz mostly.

    Legend and PR49 Not the Same - YouTube

    Legend Where I Stand - YouTube

    other hunts with sleds:

    Kork down we go - YouTube

    Kork a Bou - YouTube

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  10. #28
    Senior Member Beendare's Avatar
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    ^^ Good vids Larry

    I might just build me a sled...but a foot or more wider so it floats across stuff easier....
    “It takes no more time to see the good side of life than to see the bad.” ― Jimmy Buffett

    "You don't drown by falling in the water; you drown by staying there.” ― Edwin Louis Cole

  11. #29
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    more surface area...more drag friction. I dialed in it to 20" width and 80" length based on what friction i felt with 125-lbs in a sled with wider and narrower (longer and shorter) configs, FYI.

  12. #30
    Senior Member Beendare's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bartlett View Post
    more surface area...more drag friction. I dialed in it to 20" width and 80" length based on what friction i felt with 125-lbs in a sled with wider and narrower (longer and shorter) configs, FYI.
    Thx for the info Larry. Call my post above internet jibber jabber theorizing....I have no actual idea of what will work in the field and I appreciate you sharing your testing.
    “It takes no more time to see the good side of life than to see the bad.” ― Jimmy Buffett

    "You don't drown by falling in the water; you drown by staying there.” ― Edwin Louis Cole

  13. #31
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    The sled is a HUGE help; I'm just surprised Larry isn't marketing them yet. I've tried a cart, too - sled works better for almost all terrain. Finding a moose to kill is only one part of the equation - finding one that you can retrieve is a key factor in the calculus.

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