1lb difference in elk rifle- is it worth it?

brsnow

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Apr 28, 2019
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For me it makes a difference, I do have a gun bearer which is great, but most of the time I like to carry my rifle.
 

brsnow

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Apr 28, 2019
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My current fieldcraft is 3/4lb heavier than my kimber and couple days in the mountains so far and I can notice the difference.
 

PA Hunter

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Dec 29, 2018
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I lugged a 13 lb Remington. 300 ultra mag Sendero around for many years up & down mountains of Wyoming, Montana & Colorado & Boggs of Newfoundland and i realize now how stupid i was. That rifle is now a safe queen and replaced with a Fierce Carbon Titanium about 7.5 with scope & bipod what a delight.

The older you get the lighter the rifle you will want.
 

njdoxie

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Apr 1, 2014
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For me it was, I had a 7.75lb (bare) Browning, finally reached my breaking point, got tired of lugging it around and bought a 6lb (bare) Tikka super lite in 300 win mag, shoots great and only cost $600. I had Sportsmans Warehouse weigh it before I bought, then weighed with my own scale and both agreed at 6lbs, that's it's advertised weight (yes I was skeptical that it would actually weigh what it was advertised to weigh, as I've been burned before). I'm getting older and weight matters greatly to me. Wish I bought it 10 years ago, as there were many times over the years where I would think to myself, that I need a lighter everything including rifle. Only cost me $200-$300, as I sold my previous rifle to finance the new one. And it does feel light in my hand.
 
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rootacres

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Jan 5, 2018
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Maybe this is the unpopular opinion but here it goes. I know the caliber isn't an issue, you like both. I could make a case on that but I won't. I think it is more than just a 1lb difference. You get a trigger tech trigger, a very rigid stock, limb saver recoil pad (which I really like), carbon wrapped barrel, cerakoted action and barrel metal. All of which are a step in the right direction compared to your .270 in my opinion. Plus its a little lighter.
 

87TT

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Mar 13, 2019
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If you want a new gun and can afford it, why not? My newest centerfire is 42 years old. (Ruger M77R 30 06). I did just spend over grand for flintlock "kit" that took me 140+ hrs. to build. As for weight, I don't use a sling unless I am dragging out a deer.
 

wind gypsy

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Dec 30, 2014
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Maybe this is the unpopular opinion but here it goes. I know the caliber isn't an issue, you like both. I could make a case on that but I won't. I think it is more than just a 1lb difference. You get a trigger tech trigger, a very rigid stock, limb saver recoil pad (which I really like), carbon wrapped barrel, cerakoted action and barrel metal. All of which are a step in the right direction compared to your .270 in my opinion. Plus its a little lighter.

Agree with all but the rigid stock part. The forearms of every ridgeline I’ve handled have been quite flexible and the grip is pretty lousy.
 

rootacres

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Jan 5, 2018
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Agree with all but the rigid stock part. The forearms of every ridgeline I’ve handled have been quite flexible and the grip is pretty lousy.

Yeah you're right. I probably should have added some context. The Ridgeline stock I had was considerably more rigid than pretty much all factory synthetic stocks I have messed with. But was not as rigid as the Axial (now alterra arms) stock I have now on my custom build.
 
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