1st Moose roast

Short Track

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Oct 3, 2017
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Too far east
The packages said "blade roast". Took 6 hours to cook. Very very tender as compared to the round steaks., and some of the other cuts which are very tough to eat.
 

AKDoc

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We primarily cook our roasts and steaks in the crock-pot, and they are excellent eating, e.g., stews, chili's, soups, etc. Never chewy or tough, but I also don't cook them on the grill because that is not my wife's preference.

She makes an EXCELLENT curry moose in the crock-pot. She recently bought an Instant Pot, so she is experimenting with that...last night we had stir-fry moose (round steak). She first partially pre-cooked the meat in the Instant Pot and then finished in the fry pan with the mixed vegetables...it was damn good!

We use a local meat processor (Indian Valley Meats), so we also have a good supply of ground meat, Italian sausage (my wife has Italian roots), breakfast sausage, Polish, teriyaki and pepper sticks, liver sausage (Braunswagger sp?), and even "moose bacon", which we really like.

My kids like making moose burgers on the grill.
 

AKDoc

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Thank you guys for COMPLETELY distracting me from the overwhelming news of the day.

😋
I hear you!

I realize that I went into excessive detail this morning, describing the different moose options that we enjoy routinely in my world. It felt good thinking about that topic as opposed to all the other moving parts right now.

Oh...and I forgot to mention the jalapeño and cheese moose hot-dogs! Those are awesome, but you've got to make sure you don't burn your mouth on the cheese.

(sorry guys...long day working remotely!!)
 

hodgeman

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Delta Junction, AK
Moose roast really shines in a crock pot or pressure cooker.

Tenderloin, backstraps and a few other cuts can be steaked and grilled...but anything over medium rare puts your mortal soul in jeopardy.
 

Nick Muche

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Moose Roasts are best cut into steaks and then cooked properly in a cast iron skillet on high heat with plenty of salt and pepper.
 

AK Troutbum

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Apr 22, 2012
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Chugiak, Alaska
We eat a lot of moose, as do many people around here, and a fair amount of it is roasts, but my biggest challenge with moose roasts is having it not turn out too dry. Never have an issue with it being tough, just often times it ends up on the dry side.


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Nick Muche

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Do you cover it entirely with liquid, etc. when in a crock pot? I've found it falls apart better when it's about half covered. We do a lot of crock pot roasts and they all turn out good. Sear the hell out of it before you put it in the crock pot or oven, then cook it low and slow for as long as you can.
 

Wapiti1

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For thick roasts, lard them in some way to keep them from drying out. Caul fat wrap, bacon wrap, or. My favorite method is to get chorizo, or another loose ground sausage, roll it into 1" logs about 6-8" long and freeze them. Us a wooden spoon to poke a hole in the roast the length of the sausage log and then shove the frozen sausage into the roast. A big roast will take 2-3 sausage logs. Let it thaw overnight in the roast, and roast the next day. This only works on a long cook where the sausage gets hot enough to render, but it adds a lot of flavor and moisture to the meat. Can also use normal burger meat with a good fat content in it if you don't want extra flavors.

That said, I cut almost everything into steaks. It's been years since I had a moose, so we'll see if I get one this fall.

Jeremy
 

AKDoc

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May 16, 2015
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Do you cover it entirely with liquid, etc. when in a crock pot? I've found it falls apart better when it's about half covered. We do a lot of crock pot roasts and they all turn out good. Sear the hell out of it before you put it in the crock pot or oven, then cook it low and slow for as long as you can.
Right on guy...that's exactly the way it's done in my house...minus the searing it part, and it turns-out great.

Might try the searing as a controlled experimental study!
 

Tony Trietch

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We eat a lot of moose, as do many people around here, and a fair amount of it is roasts, but my biggest challenge with moose roasts is having it not turn out too dry. Never have an issue with it being tough, just often times it ends up on the dry side.
Like Nick said, I cover the meat with liquid and it turns out moist. Sear is dutch oven then cover with beef stock and slow cook @250* for 4-6 hours. The braising aspect is key to moisture in my experience.
 

VernAK

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Dec 24, 2012
Messages
954
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Delta Jct, Alaska
We primarily cook our roasts and steaks in the crock-pot, and they are excellent eating, e.g., stews, chili's, soups, etc. Never chewy or tough, but I also don't cook them on the grill because that is not my wife's preference.

She makes an EXCELLENT curry moose in the crock-pot. She recently bought an Instant Pot, so she is experimenting with that...last night we had stir-fry moose (round steak). She first partially pre-cooked the meat in the Instant Pot and then finished in the fry pan with the mixed vegetables...it was damn good!

We use a local meat processor (Indian Valley Meats), so we also have a good supply of ground meat, Italian sausage (my wife has Italian roots), breakfast sausage, Polish, teriyaki and pepper sticks, liver sausage (Braunswagger sp?), and even "moose bacon", which we really like.

My kids like making moose burgers on the grill.
Doc, You're right about those Italian Sausage from Indian Valley as they are quite good.
 
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