2018 Caribou Hunt

CO_jakrabt

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Messages
47
Location
Colorado
Me and a couple buddies are planning a trip in 2018. We've looked into a number of places, made a bunch of calls. Now want forum feedback on guys that have done it. We've crossed off arrowhead and all outfitters out of kotzebue. We want a drop in hunt in northern brooks range for mid to late august. 7-10 days. We've talked to Bushwacker and BRA for drop ins. Both are around $2500 and Bushwakcer said the porcupine herd is growing and is a better option. We will catch the first part of migration up there in north brooks. We have called of few gears rental places but I'm debating mailing my Yukon tent, stove, and camp utensils to a buddy that lives in Fairbanks for $150. Then buy a cot, and propane and food once we arrive at sportsmen. I've also thought about taking my tipi and stove up just have thought if there would be wood for burning a fire or not. We have Been told to rent a uhaul van instead of car which is cheaper and easier for hauling gear...any experience with this? In north brooks range is it possible to get in bow range or with the open tundra, rifle is best bet? Is 25A two bull unit for nonresident or will it go to one tag? Lastly....we're told most successful hunts are float trips as you can take time to cover more ground and also get a moose tag. Anyone have experience with floats trips? Thanks!
 

Larry Bartlett

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2013
Messages
655
This is abroad generalization, but most bow hunts are 25% successful in general. Rifle hunters are 75% on most fly ins. A lot of bow hunters take at least one rifle and get meat in camp, then focus on strategy once their "harvest" is secured.

The terrain is effective for bow hunting, but you need time to figure out local strategies in the arctic because terrain character differs. Some spots have concealed brush lines near river crossings, others have some strategic character to hind behind...but it all looks flat and undoable when you first arrive. Just got to get dropped in, study your surroundings, and bust a move on a bou or two to get schooled on what you can pull off for success.

Forget moose combo floats north of the Brooks Range, regardless of whether you hunt west, central or east.
 

Nick Muche

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2012
Messages
3,020
Location
Alaska
Hunting caribou on the tundra north of the Brooks is a lot like spot and stalk Pronghorn in the western US. Wide open mostly, but there are terrain features that can be used to get close. It can be very tough, or very easy... First year up there I shot two bulls on the first day. I got in front of them and they came right by me as I hid behind a very small bush. After that, I couldn't get close to several others over the course of a week. Following year, the area we were dropped off just wasn't conducive to bowhunting at all and we shot a few with rifles. Last year, I stalked 4 bulls and killed three with the bow. They were all in the right spot at the right time. Best of luck...

Things are changing fast up there, be careful booking anything too far out and be flexible.

I'd go elsewhere personally, unless hunting the north slope is important to you for other reasons.
 
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