2018 Hoyt Carbon RX1 Initial Build Setup and Tune

Doc89

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The new bow is all put together and I'm very satisfied with how its been tuning up, I shared some of my results with robby denning and William Hanson (live2hunt) on a thread and was asked to outline the steps I've taken thus far to get to where it currently sits. I also wanted to include the resources that I used to get there as I strongly encourage someone working on the new bow to give them a good read! I'm excited to share my results here as this is my first bow build start to finish. After being at the mercy of a bow shop my first year getting into archery last year I decided when I ordered the new bow that I just wanted to jump in with two feet and learn how to do everything on my own. Hopefully this will help some other guys in the same boat to take the leap with me, It's been one of the most rewarding aspects of my short archery career so far (as well as shooting and hunting of course).

I decided to go with the regular RX1 over the Ultra even though my draw length is probably longer than average and well suited for the Ultra. I had the Defiant Aluminum 34 last year and loved it however I'm eager to try different setups, at 30'' I'm actually at the last slot on the #3 cam getting the most efficiency, in theory a 32'' ATA with larger cams and a better string angle seems to be close to "just right" for a hunting setup getting benefits from better string angle and a more compact package. So far I'm digging the RX1 no question, I have shot the Ultra since and also like that option so maybe a backup bow if I could save up for another. Maybe even one setup more for 3D and longer distance...

Resources to consider:
-First and foremost, read the owners manual that comes with the bow. If you're waiting for it on order it is available for download on the Hoyt website as well as the next resource.
-2018 Hoyt Product Technical Bulletin found on Hoyt's website. VERY helpful when getting an initial tune. (hoyt.com/support middle of page under product literature)
-YouTube video "Hoyt RX1 REDWRX Bow Build with JOHN DUDLEY- Patriot Edition", very detailed video of a very experienced Hoyt bow expert. The nockonarchery YouTube channel has many other helpful videos also.

To get started here is a list of current components that went into the overall build and bow specs that I ordered it with
Bow: RX1, 70lb limbs, RH, 32" ATA, 85% letoff mods, Buckskin Riser, Black limbs, #3 Cam @ 30" draw length (coming in at 71 lbs)
Rest: Nock On Elevate Limb Driven Rest (2.0 model maybe?) upgraded version of the AAE Pro Drop
Sight: Custom Montana Black Gold Ascent Verdict Assault 4 Pin
Stabilizer: Fuse Carbon Torch FX 8"
Arrows: Easton Axis 5mm pro match grade 300 spine, 50 grain brass hit insert, 100 gr point, 3 fletch AAE 2.8" max stealth 2-3 degree straight offset, nockturnal x nock, cut to 29" from throat of nock to end of carbon shaft= 513 gr @ 280 fps

Initial Build, Set up, and Tuning:

1.) First things first, set draw length to 30". I had already tested this bow at my draw length in the cam position for in the identicle bow so went straight to the cam slot and peg adjustments (new design for 2018, similar to Defiant DFX however)

2.) Check and adjust timing as necessary. Mine was relatively close, top cam was hitting about 3/16" ahead of the bottom cam. Hoyt specified in their technical bulletin that ideally both cams cable stops should touch the cables at the same time or the top cam slightly ahead of bottom but no more than 1/16" ahead of bottom cam. To correct I had to add equal amounts of twists to the yoke cables where they connect at the TOP. You are not supposed to mess with the twists in the bottom buss cable to correct timing. Final timing ended coming in pretty close to both cams hitting at the same time with the top ahead of the bottom maybe 1/32-1/64" ahead.

3.) Visually check cam lean (at brace). According to the Hoyt Technical Bulletin, these bows have been designed to tune with the top cam in the most verticle stright up and down position. I found this to be absolutely correct (at brace). I just eye balled it and moved forward with setup and later had to correct this after putting a straight edge on each side of the cam to check lean, you can also use an arrow shaft.

4.) Install rest, visually ensure rest is level. I secured it in the most rearward position as to my understanding this is best for torque. Also the rest was plenty far enough from the tech riser and centered between the shelf and tech riser that when all the way to the rear and level provides a good baseline in the event it ever comes loose (I like redundancy). At that time I visually did a coarse center shot adjustment by centering the arrow shaft in the center of the riser, close to center of the tiller bolt, and close to 13/16" from center of arrow shaft to riser. With the rest at its most center or zeroed position the bottom of the arrow shaft runs right through the center of the berger button hole so I started with that and it tuned up in that position.

5.) Tie in D-loop with nock sets to set nock pinch and check nock fit. Set the nocking point at 90 degrees to the string and level using a basic arrow leveling kit (the yellow ones that are most common).The nockturnal x nock fits excellent on the factory string/serving combination. Roughly 5/8-3/4" D-loop to avoid torquing the string with the release. Leaving 1/16" (maybe) Gap below nock to avoid nock pinch. Later found out how critical this really is...

6.) Install Peep sight and tie in, check with sight quick for alignment. I later changed this to get really dialed in as it was different then my last bow and I didn't know at the time that i can set this in a draw board by measuring from center of arrow shaft to center of peep.

7.)Install Sight and level 1st, 2nd, 3rd axis. This can happen really at any time after initial tune however convenient while its in the vice if the tools are handy.

8.) Initial paper tuning. Heres where I learned alot about proper form and bow setup. I consistently was getting a nock high right tear. Even after making several adjustments to the rest with little to no change in the paper tear. The solution ended up being a couple different things that i know are from me not the bow design. After returning the rest to the initial baseline that's when I checked cam lean with a straight edge and discovered that the cam did have a slight lean toward the cable guard. Had to add a total of 3 twists to the right yoke cable to stand the cam up perfectly straight and also had to re set the cam timing as a result. This corrected most of the nock high right tear however consistently was getting right or high right tears so this is where I stepped back and assessed my own form and realized that i was twisting my release hand more so than I should as well as I lost my nock pinch after shooting the bow for a while. Which was just the serving bunching up and pinching the nock. So to summarize that the issue was cam lean, release hand position, and nock pinch. After I figured that out It shot a perfect bullet hole with very little rest adjustment. This was up close roughly 3-5 ft so I also checked it at 5 yards and found it a hair nock high still and with another quick adjustment is was punching bullet holes at 5 yards as well (Bumped rest up just a hair).

Currently this setup has really impressed me and is easy enough for a relatively new archer to get dialed in. On the days where the weather has been decent enough outside to shoot, It grouped really well with the bow/arrow combination. The final arrow build is still yet to be determined as I haven't group tested point weight combinations yet, and also want to try the 260 spine option as well with a bit heavier overall build. The way its shooting now I feel that I'll be sticking with the current arrow build though. The other day I was consistently putting 3 arrows inside of 1 inch at 30 yards and 3 arrows inside of 3 inches at 50 yards if I could time the wind right.

So after figuring out what the bow liked I can say that I wish I would have known about the info put out by Hoyt regarding the cam lean as I would have just straightened that out right off the get go. Which is not at all a discredit to the design or Hoyt, thats just lack of knowlage on my end with a new setup. If a guy does that first you can adjust timing only once as well which would save a step. Aside from correcting my hand position the only other thing that has given me any real issue is getting a good nock fit. I'm still working on that one to be honest, to my understanding the serving can bunch up sometimes if its not bound tight enough from the factory. It doesn't seem to be negatively effecting the bow too much other than it just keeps putting more pinch pressure on the nock. I would assume that this eventually would change the tune as well so that will be my next step in the process. After I get that portion figured out I will be on to do some broadhead tuning at distance. I'll report back with a follow up to this post with my results, I'm looking forward to testing some more combinations and seeing what this thing is truly capable of come hunting season. Let me know if i can help answer any questions.
 
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Brendan

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When you say zero cam lean, do you mean at brace or at full draw?

Regarding your rest position being best for torque - that's actually a relationship between rest, sight, bow design and your grip so you need to test / torque tune to find the ideal spot. When its dead on, you can torque the bow left or right, put the pin on the target - and you'll still hit where you aim. I think I've posted it here before, but I can look up the process I followed if you want.
 
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Doc89

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When you say zero cam lean, do you mean at brace or at full draw?

Regarding your rest position being best for torque - that's actually a relationship between rest, sight, bow design and your grip so you need to test / torque tune to find the ideal spot. When its dead on, you can torque the bow left or right, put the pin on the target - and you'll still hit where you aim. I think I've posted it here before, but I can look up the process I followed if you want.
Zero cam lean at brace, that's how I interpreted the Hoyt's technical bulletin and that's what I adjusted it to.

I would be interested in the thread you are talking about for torque tuning. I get the concept but I honestly haven't began messing with that yet. Would definitely be worth looking into.

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Doc89

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jmez

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If a guy does that first you can adjust timing only once as well which would save a step.

Most always will have to adjust it again when the strings settle. It is going to move. I usually wait to adjust the timing, tie in the peep for real and do any tuning until this has happened. I don't put mine on the draw board until the strings move. I set it all up, level everything and then then just wrap a few times around the peep. Shoot it at 20 yards until the peep moves. Reset the peep, tie it in for good and then start timing and tuning.
 
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Doc89

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Latest Build Update:

I've changed a few things in the process of fine tuning and left a few things the same. A couple of which really surprised me and ended up being very educational for a still relatively new archer.

I had mentioned before that my serving seems to be separating and it in fact had and went a little out of tune as it raised my nocking point. Pretty common thing I've been told so I figured what better opportunity to learn how to re-serve the center-serving myself.

First try went well, tied my nocking points in with arrow coming off at 90 degrees with the bottom of the shaft running through the upper half of the berger button hole like I had tuned before. Paper tuned no problem however in less than 20 shots I noticed I lost my nock pinch gap and the serving was scrunching upwards and after checking again through paper my nocking point had raised. Figured I didn't serve it tight enough so re-did it all again only more tightly. All seemed well however got the same results again only later around 100 shots... So here's the learning moment for me; I feel that possibly having the nocking point slightly high as in arrow coming off at 90 on the upper half of Berger button hole pulls upwards on the serving or significantly more so than when the shaft runs through the center of the berger button hole. I don't know if that's true or not but wouldn't it make more sense to have the nocking point closer to the perfect center of the string? So that's what I did....

Third times a charm. I re-served the serving again. As tight as serve #2. Only when I set my nocking point I set it so the arrow is coming off at 90 degrees through the center of the Berger button hole. Also to help with the nock point issue, when I tied my nocking points I added an extra "double over/under knot" to the bottom to help with that as well. I've heard the theory behind that and it makes sense. So far I'm upwards of 200 shots with no separation of serving and no movement so I'm just gonna call it a win for now. I'll include pictures of the D-loop/nocking points for a visual as well as the shaft height. Also check out how i secured my limb cable so it's not flopping around... pet peeve of mine so I tied an "end of rope prusic" with over-hand safety. Looks clean and is very functional.

Other settings: Cam lean- still straight up and down at brace
Timing: Top cam still slightly ahead of bottom, maybe 1/32-1/64"
Center shot: just a hair under 7/8" from riser. I adjusted away from riser on initial tune and hasn't changed since. I just didn't measure how far I deviated from 13/16".
Paper tune: bullet hole at 3-4 feet and 5 yards still. (I'll add a pic later today for visual)

Next step bare shaft tuning: this is where I was really surprised... pleasantly.
So first few groups of 3 arrows Fletched and one bare shaft at 20 yards seemed to all hit together. The Bareshaft seemed to land on the left side of the group so stepped back to 30 and this is where it got interesting. Three arrows Fletched grouped well and Bareshaft arrow consistently lands 3-5" left... according to Easton's arrow tuning guide the remedy is move rest toward riser or increase point weight. Moved rest with the same results so I thought I'll decrease and increase point weight to see if it gets worse or better to verify this. To my surprise it worked exactly how Easton said it would. Bareshaft left of Fletched = stiff spine reaction. When going from 100gr point to 85gr point it hit so far left of center than the Fletched arrows and at such a "point left" angle it went through the left edge of target at an angle and into the dirt every time. So then to confirm it improved I swapped out all the point weights again but with 125 grain points. To my surprise again... it got better! This is why I'm surprised, according to bare shaft tuning test, the arrow reacts best with 125gr point on top of 50gr brass for a total of 175gr in the front of a 300 spine 29" Easton 5mm axis at 71 pound draw weight. Much heavier point weight than anticipated! However the bareshaft consistently grouped inside of the 2-3" group of fletched arrows with same point weight at 30 yards. I thought I was pushing it at 150gr up front but it is tuning better with 175gr. Broadhead grouping will get the final say on the arrow build but that's where I'm at so far.

My question to anyone reading now with more experience bare shaft tuning is that; is the bare shaft grouping with Fletched arrows a sure indicator of point weight and tune? I could see Bareshaft left a little bit being ok because that's 31gr less weight on the arrow than Fletched so if it's more stiff that makes sense.... (3 fletch aae max stealth + wrap = 31gr)
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Brendan

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So, one quick thing. I don't think the Easton tuning guide is correct. Remedy for tail right, bare shaft left, broadhead left is to move the rest LEFT, not right. There've actually been a lot of threads on this over the last couple years in a variety of places.

Some people also say that tail right reaction can be caused by too stiff of a spine, but I haven't personally ever seen that, but it does seem to have helped in your case.

Personally - I'd go back and try moving your rest left and see what happens (Or, my personal approach is to set rest at centershot parallel to riser and yoke tune first, but the rest is easy to test with so you can see the reaction)

Last thing you asked - once I have perfect bare shaft flight, I then test broadheads vs. field points at my max range. If they hit to the same point of impact (They usually do), that is indicative of a good tune in my mind.
 
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Doc89

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So, one quick thing. I don't think the Easton tuning guide is correct. Remedy for tail right, bare shaft left, broadhead left is to move the rest LEFT, not right. There've actually been a lot of threads on this over the last couple years in a variety of places.

Some people also say that tail right reaction can be caused by too stiff of a spine, but I haven't personally ever seen that, but it does seem to have helped in your case.

Personally - I'd go back and try moving your rest left and see what happens (Or, my personal approach is to set rest at centershot parallel to riser and yoke tune first, but the rest is easy to test with so you can see the reaction)

Last thing you asked - once I have perfect bare shaft flight, I then test broadheads vs. field points at my max range. If they hit to the same point of impact (They usually do), that is indicative of a good tune in my mind.
I'll give that a try next time I can get a calm day. I didn't think to try moving the rest to the left to see if that brought the bare shaft into the Fletched group.

I agree with you on the broadheads hitting with the field points (or just grouping behind a pin in general) being a good tune. Aside from all the different tuning methods that's really the end goal anyways. Thanks for the input. I'll give it a go.

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Doc89

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Paper tune after final serving job and paper tune before bare shaft testing
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Doc89

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Eastern Iowa
So, one quick thing. I don't think the Easton tuning guide is correct. Remedy for tail right, bare shaft left, broadhead left is to move the rest LEFT, not right. There've actually been a lot of threads on this over the last couple years in a variety of places.

Some people also say that tail right reaction can be caused by too stiff of a spine, but I haven't personally ever seen that, but it does seem to have helped in your case.

Personally - I'd go back and try moving your rest left and see what happens (Or, my personal approach is to set rest at centershot parallel to riser and yoke tune first, but the rest is easy to test with so you can see the reaction)

Last thing you asked - once I have perfect bare shaft flight, I then test broadheads vs. field points at my max range. If they hit to the same point of impact (They usually do), that is indicative of a good tune in my mind.
Checked to see how close my rest/arrow is setup to being parallel to riser using an arrow shaft clamped to the outside machined portion of the riser that the rest bolts to compared to a nocked arrow on the blade and she's dead on visually and less than 1/32" difference all the way out from tip to tail. Good thing to check! I'll start with that when setting up initial center shot from now on.

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