60-70 or 70-80 lbs draw weight?

Estvold7

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Hi everyone look at a new bow for spring 2013, and I would like to jump up to 70-80 lb limbs for draw weight and shoot a heaver arrow and 125 gr. broadhead. Any one out their shooting a heavy draw weight?
 
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I currently shoot a 78.5 lb Hoyt Maxxis 35 bow, with a 506.4 grain FMJ arrow, at 296 fps. I have a long draw length and shot an overdraw. Been a great performer hunting this year.
 
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a3dhunter

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definitely possible
I usually buy used bows a couple years old at more than half off of new price, hard to find a 70-80 lb bow anymore.
I believe Aron (elkreaper) is shooting a 70-80.
My experience is it just isn't needed. I shot 68 lbs with 29.5" draw and a 465 grain arrow and at 65 yards with a Trophy Taker Shuttle T fixed blade broadhead with my bull elk broadside, the arrow went straight through and buried in the hillside enough that it took three pulls to get the arrow out of the dirt.
 

hunting1

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My experience is it just isn't needed

Plus 1 to above, but if you have the physical strength, then go for it! I shoot a 450-gr arrow with 125-gr heads at 65-lbs and have had pass throughs on every elk and critter I have shot. I too buy a used bow and save big! The prices have gotten stupid IMHO, but I guess with all the Mathews comercials they have to be expensive. Good luck!
 

Rent Outdoor Gear

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I've probably said this before, but I think it warrants repeating here...

Pretty much any normal (50+) hunting weight bow and arrow combination will do the job on a good broadside shot on just about any north American big game animal.

HOWEVER... bowhunting situations are difficult if not impossible to control and sometimes in spite of all our best efforts, $h*t happens... That's when more (draw weight and arrow weight) can pay dividends. It's not going to help you if you gut shoot something, or shoot something through the backstrap. However, on bone impacts, spine impacts, frontal and rear shots that sometimes occur due to (insert scenario here), the added energy will, in some cases, make the difference between recovering an animal or living with the gut aching feeling of knowing you wounded (wasted in some instances) an animal.

I am not inviting anyone to over-bow themselves or shoot a bow they can't draw back smoothly in a cold, uncomfortable position or a bow they can't shoot accurately. I'm also not promoting frontal, rear or any other shot than a broadside or quartering away shot within your effective range. But... it's my philosophy that if you can comfortably and accurately handle the extra draw weight, you might buy yourself a little safety net when $h*t happens.

I've had $h*t happen, and on a few occasions more draw weight, arrow weight, and a better broadhead choice in my estimation would have improved my odds of celebrating rather than pouting. I've since modified my equipment selections to improve my odds. In car racing, they don't dress for the race, they dress for the crash. A lot of bowhunters plan around perfect. Bowhunt long enough and eventually perfect will turn to $h... and that's when you start to really question and analyze the equipment selections you've made.

Bottom line - if you can really handle 75-80 pounds, go for it. If you can only really manage 65 comfortably, then don't try to up the draw weight or you are only going to increase the probability of a poor shot and wounding game.

Another important piece of advice... If you're going to shoot an 80 pound bow at 72 pounds, then you're better off to bottom out the bolts on a 70 pound bow and you'll get the same 72+ pounds and more performance. Bows perform better when they're bottomed out.

Clunk, clunk... (that was me stepping down off the soap box).

Good luck and shoot straight!!

Coop
 

Brent1321

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I find 80 pounds a bit nuts. It is one thing to shoot 80 pounds in your basement, or your local club. Out in the woods, maybe you are a bit winded from a climb, cold and your are wearing your hunting clothes that are maybe a bit restrictive (compared to your shorts and t-shirt in basement....), 80 lbs is pretty stiff in ideal conditions. Sure if you can pull 80 easy, I suppose more power to you, but sure is not a requirement.

Brent
 

barmar65

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New London WI
I draw 66lbs with my darton ds-3800 arrow speed is 305fps with a 420 grain arrow, which comes out to about 85lbs of kinetic energy. I think that is more than enough, no need to draw 80lbs in this day and age with the equipment that is available.
 

Rent Outdoor Gear

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I draw 66lbs with my darton ds-3800 arrow speed is 305fps with a 420 grain arrow, which comes out to about 85lbs of kinetic energy. I think that is more than enough, no need to draw 80lbs in this day and age with the equipment that is available.

It is... until it's not.

Again, don't push your personal limits with bow weight... It needs to be comfortable and manageable in all hunting situations, but there are plenty of guys out there that can easily handle 80+ pound bows. All I'm saying is that it IS an undeniable advantage if you can pull more weight. Otherwise we would all be shooting 50 pound bows.

Coop
 

barmar65

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I agree completely. I can pull more than what i am, but its comfortable for me especially during late archery seasons here in wisconsin,which can be bitter cold. If 80 lbs is comfortable then by all means take advantage of the benefits of shooting heavier arrows. Penetration means everything. we don't usually intend on hitting a tough shoulder, but as Coop says sh$t happens.
 

justin davis

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I shoot a vector turbo at 82 lbs. I like heavy poundage. You don't need a heavy pound bow but I say if you can shoot it accurately then go for it. I like heavy arrows and the faster I can shoot that heavy arrow the more crushing power the better

I also have a short draw length
 
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JasonWi

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Jul 3, 2012
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Salem, Oregon
My Element is 70-80# limbs and I have it currently @ 76#. Im shooting a 455 grain arrow around 285fps.

Out of my last 10 animals, only two haven't been pass throughs. One a spine impact the other a broadside Kudu and I had arrow sticking out the off shoulder.
 

Jimbob

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76 lbs. I can pull it easier than my brother can pull 65. A bunch of people say I am over bowed but nobody mentions anything to my brother. If you can shoot it comfortably in any position then the more weight the better.
 

evan williams

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I like what is being said here all. I used to shoot my 2008 Katera at 84.5# and shooting it every day it became VERY comfortable and I shot it well even shot it at that weight in an NFAA 5 spot round local tournament (not a recommendation!!) but if you can handle the weight do it. I almost ALWAYS steer my customers AWAY from a 70-80# bow...MY REASON...I know my customers :) :) 99.9% of the guys that ask me for them HONESTLY can't draw 70. I had a guy who wanted a Mathews MR6 with 80# limbs. He was 5'10/210 and had been shooting for 3 mo. He wanted SPEED!!!! His plan...buy an 80 pound bow--->turn it down to 65 and by hunting season he would have it at 72-73!!! mmmmmmmmmm not efficient and not happening.

Now it hasn't been brought up and for good reason because your thought process isn't about gaining SPEED its about MAINTAINING it with a heavier arrow. Most people that I talk to don't realize that you aren't truly gaining SPEED by going with 80# over 70# or really even 60#. It simply allows you to shoot a heavier arrow at the same speed because you won't get that same light 400 spine arrow to tune at 80. Which means you will have to step up the spine on your arrow ---> heavier arrow ---> heavier arrow=less speed, unless you run the heavier draw weight and simply get back to where it was with the 70#/400 spine. But you Jump your KE!!!!!

I would also like to throw in....75% of the guys I talk to wanting 80s are deer and antelope hunting only...not elk ( and primarily --- whitetail ).

Like Darin mentioned. Truly max out your 70 and get 72# if you want just a touch more....twist up your cables a few turns (recheck timing and tune it) you can get to 74 MAYBE 75#.

Just my thoughts.
 

Hardstalk

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+1 for what evan said. Its amazing what 60-70 lb limbs will do with a taunt buss cable. I recently had new strings installed on my rampage xt (first time i have ever had strings replaced rather than bow replaced) when i received it back the timing was off quite a bit. I built a homemade bow press at the local ace hardware for 13 bucks and put about 5-6 turns on the buss. Wholly cow! Its a much tougher draw. Id guess 75-76 lbs. i have been watching the limbs closely and so far all is holding up well and this bow is the quitest and snappiest i have ever seen it. With an average of 2-3 more inches of penetration on the same targets. I of course had to chrono it and i gained no speed by doing this but i can tell there smacking the targets harder than ever.
 
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Estvold7

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Aug 27, 2012
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Location
North Dakota
Thanks guys for all your input. My old Switchback XT was maxed out at 74lbs with a 340 axis at 29.5'', that has done very well. But know I would like a bow for elk,mule deer and sheep (Big Horn Sheep in the future)
 

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