Age this goat

hunterednate

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
27
Been looking at a lot of billies prepping for my WA State once-in-a-lifetime tag (season is Oct. 1-Nov. 30). Would really like to harvest an older age class goat (the unit has only been hunted last year with one billy taken after 40+ years of no hunting. Population of 130+ goats, so I'm thinking there's gotta be some old geezers in there).

What do you guys think of the age of this billy? He seems to have the Roman nose and "donkey face" many of you guys have mentioned on other threads. What are your thoughts?
 

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Quicksilver

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2018
Messages
59
What unit/area are you hunting if you don't mind me asking? Where I bear hunt I see goats every time I go out.
 

Decker9

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 10, 2015
Messages
150
Location
BC goat mountains
He certainly looks like a bruiser!! The Roman nose is quite, huge!! And those bases too!! Hard to guess an age, but certainly a mature billy, one worth getting closer to.
 

hikenhunt

Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2013
Messages
87
Location
WA
Unfortunately we were on the way out when we spotted this guy (I was with hunterednate), so we couldn't get a closer look that day. Hopefully we can find him again!
 

Jimss

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Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
878
Looks like a mature billy but that's about all that is possible with the photos you provided. What I do when aging goats is to bring along a spotting scope and get in as close as possible to count the rings on the horns. You may need to get inside 100 yards with quality spotting scope to do this. I also have a Canon camera with a 60x lens that I can do the same thing with. The nice thing about my camera is I can bring it home and look at photos and video on the big screen to field judge animals. You would be amazed at all the things you miss that can be picked up when you look at close up photos and video!

Sounds like a great tag and an exciting hunt! Best of luck!
 
OP
hunterednate

hunterednate

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
27
Looks like a mature billy but that's about all that is possible with the photos you provided. What I do when aging goats is to bring along a spotting scope and get in as close as possible to count the rings on the horns. You may need to get inside 100 yards with quality spotting scope to do this. I also have a Canon camera with a 60x lens that I can do the same thing with. The nice thing about my camera is I can bring it home and look at photos and video on the big screen to field judge animals. You would be amazed at all the things you miss that can be picked up when you look at close up photos and video!

Sounds like a great tag and an exciting hunt! Best of luck!
Thanks! Yes, that sounds like a good strategy. We'll bring scope and camera...and hopefully get close enough. I'll keep you guys posted how it goes. Fingers crossed for some stretches of clear weather in Oct....in SW Washington, that can be a tall order.
 

Jimss

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
878
I've spent a lot of time around goats here in Colo and a little bit of time in Alaska. Most goats will actually allow you to get pretty darn close...especially in the off season! The off season is obviously the best time to get up close and personal with goats. I often try to get in as close as possible without letting them see me. They have fantastic eyes so that can often be challenging! Once they see me....which usually happens I just sit in the same spot for 15 to 20 minutes and let them get used to me. Once they figure out that I'm not aggressively trying to get close to them I'll slowly move at an angle towards them....never looking them in the eye or making any quick movements. I'll move around 10 yards at a time. Depending upon how nervous they are I can move longer/shorter distances and wait longer periods between movements. Obviously this doesn't work every time but works pretty regularly on goats during the off season.

This same thing works on sheep....but with sheep I ALWAYS do this from below. If you stalk sheep from above and they see you they will likely run! Goats it doesn't seem to matter as much if you are below or above. Both goats and sheep are on higher alert during the day.....and often super calm close to sunrise and sunset. Mature billies tend to hang out in the biggest cliffs in the area during the day.....and often come out of the cliffs to feed in early morning and evening.

I put together a long article about goats, goat behavior, etc. Most of the info is based on my experiences watching and hunting goats in Colorado and Alaska. If you send me a PM I would be glad to send it to you.
 
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hunterednate

hunterednate

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
27
I've spent a lot of time around goats here in Colo and a little bit of time in Alaska. Most goats will actually allow you to get pretty darn close...especially in the off season! The off season is obviously the best time to get up close and personal with goats. I often try to get in as close as possible without letting them see me. They have fantastic eyes so that can often be challenging! Once they see me....which usually happens I just sit in the same spot for 15 to 20 minutes and let them get used to me. Once they figure out that I'm not aggressively trying to get close to them I'll slowly move at an angle towards them....never looking them in the eye or making any quick movements. I'll move around 10 yards at a time. Depending upon how nervous they are I can move longer/shorter distances and wait longer periods between movements. Obviously this doesn't work every time but works pretty regularly on goats during the off season.

This same thing works on sheep....but with sheep I ALWAYS do this from below. If you stalk sheep from above and they see you they will likely run! Goats it doesn't seem to matter as much if you are below or above. Both goats and sheep are on higher alert during the day.....and often super calm close to sunrise and sunset. Mature billies tend to hang out in the biggest cliffs in the area during the day.....and often come out of the cliffs to feed in early morning and evening.

I put together a long article about goats, goat behavior, etc. Most of the info is based on my experiences watching and hunting goats in Colorado and Alaska. If you send me a PM I would be glad to send it to you.
Thanks Jim! PM sent.
 
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hunterednate

hunterednate

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Aug 8, 2019
Messages
27
Thanks to all for your help - especially Jimss! You got a mountain goat newbie off on the right foot.
 
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hunterednate

hunterednate

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Joined
Aug 8, 2019
Messages
27
You got yourself a wonderful goat, congrats! A mature Billy has an enormous body, sounds like yours certainly did as well!
Thanks Nick! Your comments through the whole process were super encouraging. And congrats on your Oct. Chugach goat!! I can't tell you how much respect I have for anyone who manages to shoot a goat with stick and string....let alone a gorgeous billy like that one you bagged. So cool. Thanks again.
 
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