Another release question (second try)

clip

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
30
Location
Ohio
I'm getting back into archery after a layoff due to some shoulder injuries but I have never used a release before and just wanted to know where to start.
I currently have a 20 year old Bear that I had outfitted for a release a few years ago but never shot it, so does the age of the bow, age of the shooter (55) lack of experience play into it at all.
I will be upgrading the bow at some point this summer and converting the old one to bow fishing if that matters at all too.

another question along the same lines does it matter when trying to adjust to a release what distance you practice from i.e. 30' or less
 

fiskeri1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2016
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158
I would start with a good archery pro shop and have them help you out.
 

2blade

Senior Member
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Jan 4, 2015
Messages
279
The hardest thing for me way back when I went to a release was finding one that was comfortable. I must have tried a dozen of the things before I found the right set up. I suspect a proshop would let you test em out.
 

Dameon

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Mar 30, 2016
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439
Location
St. Louis, MO
At 55 years old and just getting back into the swing of things, I'm going to go ahead and recommend a handheld thumb release or something like the new Spot Hogg Keeton release. With a history of shoulder injuries, you're going to want to distribute they draw weight across as much of your arm as possible so that it doesn't stress your shoulder as much. A wrist release will put all the pressure on your wrist and forearm whereas a handheld thumb release will put that pressure in you hand. So if you can pull start a lawnmower, you can pull back your bow....assuming you are not over bowed (too much draw weight). The Spot Hogg Keeton is a hybrid of sorts. It is a wrist release with a built in handle like a thumb release that pivots out of the way when you are ready for the shot. It seems very interesting and may be right up your alley.

The best option is to try as many releases as you can at a pro shop, but I think you will be better served by a good thumb release. I would focus on those if you can and try to find one that fits your hand well. I personally like 4 finger releases since I can use my whole hand to grip it since I also have problems with my shoulders. The problem with thumb releases is that the best ones like Stan or Carter can cost upwards of $200. For a more affordable one, I have been eyeing the Spot Hogg Whipper Snapper or Hot Shot Vapor for a back up hunting release unless I can find a used Stan Sx3. My go to release is a Stan SX2 (older model of the SX3), but I wouldn't recommend jumping right into a Stan or Carter until you can at least try one out first. That will soothe the sting of the price a little.
 
OP
C

clip

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Messages
30
Location
Ohio
Thanks Dameon thats just the information I needed to get started and you hit all my other questions too I had thought a wrist unit would be more efficient but you explained that so even I understood. when I had the bow restrung they dialed it back below 60 lbs so that should work to get started. we have every big box sporting goods retailer in our area but the only Pro shop is an hour away.
I'll find a way thanks again for all the help.
 

2blade

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2015
Messages
279
If going with a thumb release, make sure it has a wrist strap as well. If you're like me and tend to relax at full draw, you could lose it.
 

kicker338

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2016
Messages
435
Location
post falls idaho
Along with trying a release, try some new bows, bet you will be surprised maybe even shocked by the difference from your old bow. Bows have come a long, long ways from a 20yr. old one.
 
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