Any opinions on a “do it all” shelter?

WestTexasBestTexas

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Nov 27, 2020
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I’m looking at a couple of different options for shelter:
Seekoutside Cimarron or Redcliff (with stove and half nest)

Or perhaps a Hilleberg Nallo 2 GT

I’d really like something that “checks all of the boxes” - use would range from late season elk hunting to some backcountry backpacking and national park adventures with the wife. Would rather buy something versatile that would be appropriate for most seasons and give us confidence that the shelter would hold up if things get nasty (both snow or heavy rain)

I like the idea of stoves but am largely unfamiliar with floorless shelters. Obvious concern regarding bugs/snakes as well as water.

I also like the reputation of Hille and what seem to be bombproof shelters, but know it would probably be difficult to make a Nallo comfortable in warmer temperatures.

Has anybody had success finding a do-it-all tent?
 

30338

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If I had to go to one tent, it would be my Hilleberg Keron 3. Wife doesn't dig floorless. That tent is long enough for two 6'7" guys to sleep comfortably and its of course very strong. I like vestibules on both ends as well.
 
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WestTexasBestTexas

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If I had to go to one tent, it would be my Hilleberg Keron 3. Wife doesn't dig floorless. That tent is long enough for two 6'7" guys to sleep comfortably and its of course very strong. I like vestibules on both ends as well.

I will take a look - do you have any regrets over not having stove access? Is the weight manageable for backpacking in? The height point is helpful as I’m 6’5.


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JayTx

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I am going thru a similar process just with kids not wife and have come to the conclusion there's going to be a weight penalty for using one shelter for all seasons during the summer if you want a stove in the winter. This what I'm throwing around. Getting a cimarron with stove for colder times and a 3 person big agnes or msr lightweight for the warmer/bug months which we have a lot of here. You can also just get the nest like you mentioned but with the nest and cimmaron you'll probably be carrying more weight during warmer times but split between 2 people isn't a big issue.
 

30338

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I will take a look - do you have any regrets over not having stove access? Is the weight manageable for backpacking in? The height point is helpful as I’m 6’5.


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I enjoy a stove in an outfitters tent(non-backpacking) and have one for my Redcliff too. But for a sheer bombproof tent in a surprise CO fall snow storm, I'll take that Hilleberg everytime. Have been out in 50 mph sustained winds and won't do it again without the Hilleberg staked out well. Lot of tents are not going to fit tall guys really well so be sure to check floor measurements closely. This Hille has pretty vertical walls so it feels less constrained to me.
 

soggybtmboys

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Having spent 10 days in the arctic end of August and 7 days on Kodiak end of October, the ability to dry out comes into sharp focus. This year, our first full day in Kodiak was a torrent of rain with rain most other days following. The arctic it rains every day in some form.

I worry about getting wet and not being able to dry out on long trips.

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Vandy321

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Castle Rock, CO
I have thought i had the answer a few times now...
- Sawtooth with stove...stove was a PITA and no help with burn bans in effect. (Sold it)
- Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT...heavy at nearly 10lbs, but was a palace for 2 and dog (sold it, but did like it for an all around if weight was not a factor...can remove inner and pitch as just an outter/floorless if desired)
- Supertarp w/annex...loss of use of trekking poles bothered me...took a good snow in Nov and snow load capability was not what i'd consider safe, got pretty nervous one night in a blizzard with the tarp doing its best to collapse under wind/snow load (sold it)
- Currently only own a Soulo...just bought it, but room for all my gear abd can cook in vestibule, bombproof and free standing if needed, footprint is small making it easy to find a spot to pitch, can pitch in the rain and keep inner tent dry. can remove inner tent and use it as a single wall floorless (or w/footprint) in warmer weather. bad part is, a bit small for the dogs, room for one dog in tent if desired.
 
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BRTreedogs

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So my problem is if you buy a do it all bomb proof shelter, you end up packing to much weight in the early season. And while a pound doesn't sound like alot more after a couple days in the west you'll be asking what the heck is in that back.

Do it all to me means AZ centipedes and Alaska wind so it would have to be a super heavy floored shelter.

If you take those 2 extremes out id say the Cimarron

The Red cliff can be packed but it is much heavier and bigger then you would think.
 

JayTx

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Sep 24, 2018
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Texas
I have thought i had the answer a few times now...
- Sawtooth with stove...stove was a PITA and no help with burn bans in effect. (Sold it)
- Hilleberg Nammatj 3 GT...heavy at nearly 10lbs, but was a palace for 2 and dog (sold it, but did like it for an all around if weight was not a factor...can remove inner and pitch as just an outter/floorless if desired)
- Supertarp w/annex...loss of use of trekking poles bothered me...took a good snow in Nov and snow load capability was not what i'd consider safe, got pretty nervous one night in a blizzard with the tarp doing its best to collapse under wind/snow load (sold it)
- Currently only om for all my gear abd can cook in vestibule, bombproof and free standing if needed, footprint is small making it easy to find a spot to pitch, can pitch in the rain and keep inner tent dry. can remove inner tent and use it as a single wall floorless (or w/footprint) in warmer weather. bad part is, a bit small for the dogs, room for one dog in tent if desired.
- Currently only own a Soulo...just bought it, but room for all my gear abd can cook in vestibule, bombproof and free standing if needed, footprint is small making it easy to find a spot to pitch, can pitch in the rain and keep inner tent dry. can remove inner tent and use it as a single wall floorless (or w/footprint) in warmer weather. bad part is, a bit small for the dogs, room for one dog in tent if desired.

I thought about the same thing a while back using a Niak. Just using the outter for early elk season to lower the weight and have a floorless shelter. Lots of options out there.
 

Voyageur

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I agree with @Vandy321
I, too, have thought I had the answer more than once only to finally come to the conclusion there is no tent perfect for all scenarios. To give a bit of perspective to my opinions I have used numerous double wall tents over the past 35 years. Everything from an old Eureka Timberline, to a Hilleberg, to a Tarptent, and several in between. I've also owned and used 3 different tipis over the past 15 years from both Kifaru and Seek Outside. Throw in occasional hammock use over the past 10 years as well.
In my opinion, and my opinion only, I would not go floorless unless you plan to regularly use the stove. Again, just my opinion and worth what you paid for it.
 

Tyguy

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ME
If I had to go to one tent, it would be my Hilleberg Keron 3. Wife doesn't dig floorless. That tent is long enough for two 6'7" guys to sleep comfortably and its of course very strong. I like vestibules on both ends as well.
This is the same conclusion I have made. I'm 6'6" and have always had a hard time fitting well in anything. I have tried hot tents by SO as well as plenty of other traditional tents. All my research lead me to the Keron 3. Bombproof, large enough but not huge like some of hillebergs GT models. It is heavy but not unreasonably heavy. It has checked all the boxes that I needed.
 

Silver

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Feb 1, 2018
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Northern BC
When we had our little guy I went through the same thing, and we came up with a bit of a unique solution for us. I bought a black diamond Megalite pyramid tent with carbon pole (like someone said above, I hate losing my trekking poles), and my wife sewed up a floor/bug net that velcros to the bottom edge of the tent. 3 of us plus all gear fits inside, and has worked well and a mountaineering tent (Mt Rainer and the Columbia ice field), backpacking and August sheep hunting. There are things I don't love about it, but at less than 3.5lbs it works well. Wind hasn't been an issue (survived the down wash of a hovering A Star), but I'd be a little concerned if there was a big dump of wet snow. Dry winter snow has been fine, but I haven't tested it with crazy accumulations.

If at some point we look to something more bomb proof, I'd probably go for a Nallo 3 GT and pick up or make a tarp for those ultra light trips.
 

Beendare

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I must have 6 tents.

About the closest I have to all in one as you mentioned is a tipi....slightly oversize for your intended use is best, IMO.
Plusses and Minuses;

Tipi is the strongest weight to strength ratio

Mine is Its too much for one....but a palace which can be real nice and its not that much more weight than a one man backpacking tent.

Its light enough to backpack especially with more than one person- probably the best weight to utility ratio.

a light stove makes it like home

Its not as nice as a canvas wall tent for road camping...smaller.
 

kwdavis04

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Oct 4, 2018
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Montana
When you figure out the "one size fits all": Dont tell anyone. Take the design to manufacturer, make lots of money. There are lots of options that fill most needs, none that fill all. Your idea of cimarron with stove, liner, and half nest would give you lots of versatility and you don't have to use all pieces at once.
 

Sweetleavzzz

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Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
12
I’m looking at a couple of different options for shelter:
Seekoutside Cimarron or Redcliff (with stove and half nest)

Or perhaps a Hilleberg Nallo 2 GT

I’d really like something that “checks all of the boxes” - use would range from late season elk hunting to some backcountry backpacking and national park adventures with the wife. Would rather buy something versatile that would be appropriate for most seasons and give us confidence that the shelter would hold up if things get nasty (both snow or heavy rain)

I like the idea of stoves but am largely unfamiliar with floorless shelters. Obvious concern regarding bugs/snakes as well as water.

I also like the reputation of Hille and what seem to be bombproof shelters, but know it would probably be difficult to make a Nallo comfortable in warmer temperatures.

Has anybody had success finding a do-it-all tent?
I use a alps mountaineering grey cliff 2p. It's alil heavy for back packing but I've gotten used to it. Set up isn't as fast as some of the simple 1p tents I've seen but the thing is indestructible so far. I use a couple different sleeping pads and bags depending on the weather to make it well rounded.
 

Wapiti16

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May 27, 2020
Messages
69
I'm running a Seek Outside Eolus. Big enough for two cozy (fine since it's your wife), two vestibules, extremely lightweight. I got mine with the nest so it has a floor/bug protection if I want it. Pitches with two trekking poles, which I carry anyway.
 

Montero

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Oct 20, 2012
Messages
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I like the option of a stove for late season hunts for comfort and drying gear. I've been in some pretty high winds in tipi style tents and did fine.... with some thought put into placing the shelter behind small wind breaks like rocks/small trees /shrubs. As I get older I kinda like not having to crawl into and out of a shelter all the time. And less weight is a high priority for me.

I've run SO LBO, MSR Twins sisters, Sierra Designs Guide Tarp and I'd like to try a Kifaru Sawtooth.....my next step is to add a nest. My wife does not really like floorless shelters but is willing to try the nest route.
 

Usi05

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Michigan
Start by saying I’m not nearly as experienced in this as others. I’ve tried a few backpacking tent and then went floorless.

When I got in to western hunting a few years ago I thought I wanted a fly creek 2. Slept in a friends and loved it.

Then I bought a tipi and traded for a supertarp and really enjoyed it. Good combo of pack ability and weight along with option of heat.

Then stayed in buddies seek tipi with a stove. Stove was an absolute game changer for me. Able to dry out clothes and cook right in tipi. Was such a nice thing to come back to.

I really only plan to hunt out west 7-15 days a year.

I use my supertarp for camping out when I trout fish and travel for whitetail.

Currently looking at next option for taking my girls and trying to justify a big tipi.

Hardest part for me was getting over not having a floor. Grabbed a bivy and haven’t worried since.


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BuckeyeRifleman

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Nov 26, 2018
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Ohio
There really isn’t a one size fits all tent. You are going to end up with two, minimum, and probably more than that.

I’ve got a Cimmeron with a large u-turn and a 8 man with an SXL, each fits the extreme of use.

Cimmeron is good for 1-2, and light enough to pack in a ways. But if I had to use it as a base camp style tent, even with only one, it would be cramped. I tried that in 2019 with two during a super cold Montana opener and it was miserable. Too cramped to stay in for any length of time and be comfortable.

8 man is a plush base camp for up to two, and comfortable and light for 3-4 in the backcountry.

If I had to go down to one, it would be the Redcliff. I don’t own one, but it’s a great tent. That said, the Redcliff is a bit much for one guy to pack with a stove. I would imagine it would also would be cramped with two cots as a base camp in the late season with gear.

I’ve also got a DST tarp that works well for super light early season stuff with a bivy or as an emergency shelter.

In reality you need a few tents to cover all conditions/group sizes...

DST/Silex size for solo-ultralight use

Cimmeron size for 1-2 hot tenting.

8 man for 3-4 man backcountry use, or a mobile quick to pitch base camp for 1-2.

Wall tent for a comfortable long term base camp in extreme conditions or larger parties.

Also don’t fear floorless... That said I’m mostly a late season/winter user due to hunting where bugs/snakes aren’t much of a concern.

If they are however the liners are a great option, albeit a bit heavy.

Another great option is a bug bivy like the ones from Borah gear. Adds less than 5oz and encapsulates you from the creepy crawlers. (Trust me, I’m not a fan of bugs/snakes either.)
 
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