Anyone Run Trail runners for elk??

Jtelarkin08

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2013
Messages
1,198
Im hunting new mexico this year and there are some steep spots but nothing like colorado. I will be day hunting most days and covering alot of miles. I am really thinking about taking some trail runners and trying those. I figure if I dont like them I can go to my go to Boots.
 

Bearlodge10

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2014
Messages
258
Location
NE Wyoming
I have used my trail running shoes on hunts that were close to the house (within minutes). These were hunts where I was pressed for time after work and literally ran into an area, got the wind right and hunted the next drainage back out to the truck. Truly a run and gun hunt with a bow. Anyway, the terrain is moderately steep and I covered quite a bit off trail. I enjoyed the light feel of the feet but wanted something with ankle support. I run Asics kahana, brooks adrenaline ASR and hoka challenger atr. If I was to pick a shoe for this hunt and for similar country I'd suggest a mid height shoe like one of the salamon ultras with the gore Tex liners. Your feet might get a little warmer but it would be nice for early mornings with dew and possibility of rain. I like those because of the lugs for traction and for shedding mud etc.
just my .02. Good luck!
 

Salix

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2015
Messages
44
Location
British Columbia
There was a thread on here a couple years ago about trail runners for hunting. I tried it last year on my backpack elk hunt for a few days. Pros are light feet, which helps after a week of hiking through the bush. When it rained they dried out much faster than the leather hikers.
Cons: I had trouble keeping sticks and debris out of them, even with gaters. Ankle support is non existent when packing heavy packs out and you need to be careful of down hill, side slopes, and stepping on uneven ground.
I'll take them again this year, and alternate between the hikers and the trail shoes, especially if it's wet. I had the Solomon Speedcross3.
 

Archery Bank

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
42
Location
Southern AZ
Last September in Az I used a pair of Hoka One One Tor Tech mid. They were great for day hunts, quiet and comfortable. Averaged ten to twelve miles a day.
 

timekiller13

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
563
I've been using some trail runners for my training hikes. The pros are they are light weight and dry out quickly. But I really need the ankle support, especially when going down hill or carrying a heavy load. I basically found the trail runners useless for me in anything more than moderately steep terrain or with anything more than 40lbs in my pack. But that's me, my ankles are not the best, I've sprained both ankles multiple times, torn ligaments and such. If you have better ankles then they may work out. I really wish I could use them. The weight difference is awesome.
 

bigdesert10

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2016
Messages
293
Location
Idaho
I think they'd be awesome for scouting purposes, but I can't see myself using them for an actual hunt. The reason being I just need more ankle support and a little more stiffness in the sole when I'm packing meat out.
 

wncbrewer

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
177
I love my solomans for day hiking with the family but I really don't see how guys wear them in technical country and with heavy loads. Maybe I just have weak ankles. I like my stiff, supportive boots.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Felix40

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2015
Messages
1,554
Location
New Mexico
I tried some on a sheep hunt last year. I didnt really have any complaints except getting cactus in my toes and always bumping my ankle bones into rocks when moving across scree. I went back to boots for this years sheep hunt if that says anything.
 

Blockcaver

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2012
Messages
1,486
Location
BC
I used Merrill trail runners (forgot model) in AZ unit 4B about 10 yrs ago on an archery elk hunt. They worked fine in the heat and relatively flat terrain. Not as well in most areas of CO. As a side note I saw a guy Stone sheep hunting in BC a couple of years ago in trail running shoes. The weather was rainy and cold but that was what he chose for footwear the DIY trip. We crossed paths a time or two before he left to go compete in a marathon in southern BC. He had tougher legs, ankles and feet than most of us possess for sure.
 
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