Arrow flight at different elevations above sea level????

Bowhuntr64

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For those of you who hunt at different elevations...like 11,000' as opposed to 5000' as opposed to 500', for example, do you notice much of a difference in arrow flight? I know Tiger Woods could drive a golf ball about 30 yards farther in Colorado vs back east, but what about an arrow?
 

Jared Bloomgren

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Yes there is a difference in arrow flight as you gain in elevatoin due to the thinner air. The best way I have found to adjust for this is to decrease draw weight to get the pins back to the point of impact that I am looking for. This way will keep all your pins more accurate rather than having to sight in each individual pin. I will usually shoot at 40 yards in the higher elevation and turn my limb bolts down until the 40 is spot on. I will check my other pins to see how they have changed as well.

This way all I have to do is turn my poundage back up when I go home.
 
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Bowhuntr64

Bowhuntr64

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Yes there is a difference in arrow flight as you gain in elevatoin due to the thinner air. The best way I have found to adjust for this is to decrease draw weight to get the pins back to the point of impact that I am looking for. This way will keep all your pins more accurate rather than having to sight in each individual pin. I will usually shoot at 40 yards in the higher elevation and turn my limb bolts down until the 40 is spot on. I will check my other pins to see how they have changed as well.

This way all I have to do is turn my poundage back up when I go home.

That is really cool. I have never heard of that technique. Have you ever estimated an adjustment calculation, like 1# per 1000' or something like that?
 

RosinBag

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Randy Ulmer did a great article on this about 7-10 years ago. He also adjusts his poundage by turning the bow down. He also said the average hunter would never know it. He was talking about a half turn of your limb at 9000'.

Ulmer is a tremendous archer. I don't think most archers could tell the difference of a half turn or even a turn.

A turn off your limb bolt is about 2-2.5 pounds or roughly 6-9 GPS. At 40 yards that is about 1-2" depending on the weight and speed of your arrow. So if you shot a group of arrows at 40 yards they may be two inches high. I don't think most can shoot well enough to notice that.

I personally agree with Ulmers thoughts. I think time of flight if your arrow, arrow speed, arrow drag and shooter ability is probably not going to affect many archers. Just my two cents though.
 
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Bowhuntr64

Bowhuntr64

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Randy Ulmer did a great article on this about 7-10 years ago. He also adjusts his poundage by turning the bow down. He also said the average hunter would never know it. He was talking about a half turn of your limb at 9000'.

Ulmer is a tremendous archer. I don't think most archers could tell the difference of a half turn or even a turn.

A turn off your limb bolt is about 2-2.5 pounds or roughly 6-9 GPS. At 40 yards that is about 1-2" depending on the weight and speed of your arrow. So if you shot a group of arrows at 40 yards they may be two inches high. I don't think most can shoot well enough to notice that.

I personally agree with Ulmers thoughts. I think time of flight if your arrow, arrow speed, arrow drag and shooter ability is probably not going to affect many archers. Just my two cents though.

Thanks RosinBag, that is helpful!
 

OR Archer

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I was concerned about this when I took my trip to Colorado a couple years ago. Living at 450' and hunting at 12k is a huge difference. We took a target and shot at the trail head for quite a while. I noticed no difference in my set up at the higher elevations even out to 60 yards. I was surprised that I didn't have to make any adjustments to my setup. I will always take a target with me on such trips to make sure everything is still good to go before beginning my hunt.
 

ontarget7

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The difference in elevation from where I practice all year to where I hunt is roughly 4000-5000 ft and have never had any issues
 

bohntr

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Feb 24, 2012
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White Mountains of Arizona
I live at exactly 23' above sea level. When I shoot at 11,500-12,000' there is a noticeable difference in arrow impact. At 40 yards, it's generally a few inches high. While seemingly not that big of a difference, it becomes magnified when shooting extreme angles. I readjust as well (limb bolts) at extreme elevation.
 

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