Arrow setup and broadhead selection

Bigolbill

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Oct 13, 2021
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4
Location
Ohio
Looking for any amount of guidance for my first post. The only game I will be hunting for the time being is whitetail.

I’m pretty new to archery, I picked up my first bow a couple of months ago. I’m using a Hoyt Torrex XT, 60# draw weight, 30” draw length. I’m currently shooting Easton 6.5mm Acu-carbons with a 100 grain tip. Using rage hypodermic mechanicals as my broad head of choice. The archery shop in my area is very old school and just gives you what’s easy to understand as a beginner, 340 spine, mechanical broadhead. As I’m sure most people on here know, it’s easy to go down the rabbit head of mechanical vs fixed, High FOC and heavier arrows. There’s so much information to sift through I figured I’d post to see if anyone could give me some direct advice.

I was looking at iron will broadheads, personally I just gravitate towards the simplicity of a fixed blade broadhead. As for arrows I was thinking of switching over to Easton 5MM Axis match grade.

I guess to get down to it, if I was wanting to switch to a 300 spine Easton 5MM axis with iron will broadheads, is there anything I should know before experimenting with this setup as someone new to archery? Eastons website says FOC should be maintained around 10-15%, should I go higher? Are 125 broadheads going to be better than 100? Is a 300 spine arrow going to suit me better than a 340? Heavier inserts? Do I just buy these things and experiment in my own? Overall arrow weight, 5 grains per poundage or higher?

There’s a sea of information on arrow setups, it’s hard to know what to agree with as a beginner. Hoping to pick the brains of archers more seasoned than myself.

Thanks
 
Last edited:

beforethehunt

Senior Member
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Dec 12, 2018
Messages
288
Regarding heads and arrows-flight , good flight is number 1. I would recommend a 500-600 grain arrow with a good cut on contact head or similar. Magnus black hornet or QAD to Cody’s are good budget friendly options. Iron will is top notch for durability and edge retention


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isItFallYet

Senior Member
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Sep 24, 2019
Messages
271
IMO, you don't need to worry too much about FOC and heavy arrows for whitetails. I've had good luck with the 5mms paired with QAD exodus 100s. I've killed elk with that setup and a total weight of 426 grains. Obviously proper tuning and good shot placement is key.
 

Shupe88

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2019
Messages
219
I shoot a mixture of both cut on contact and mechanicals. Key is having your bow well tuned and being consistent with your shot process. The best mechanical on the market IMO is Sevr. I can’t speak for every mechanical because I haven’t shot all of them. But I have shot most of them. And there are multiple good fixed blades out there. Just depends on what your budget is. This is speaking about whitetail hunting. Larger game I would definitely stick with only fixed blades.


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Rob5589

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Sep 6, 2014
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W Sac CA
A 28-29" carbon to carbon, .340/350, standard insert, 125 grain head, will put you in the 12-15% foc range, around 425-435 grains taw, plenty of juice for deer and larger animals. I currently shoot the Black Hornets and have had great results with them. Of course the IW has a large following and is a top tier head.

Tune for perfect, not close, arrow flight and your arrow will do it's job if you do yours.
 

Iawalleyeguy

Junior Member
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Oct 13, 2021
Messages
23
Easton axis 5mm with 75 grain insert and 100-125 grain single bevel head(Van Dieman or Cutthroat) should get you 500-550 grains and fly like darts.
I have personally and have several friends who have had bad luck with Easton FMJ's so I wouldn't recomend that series.
 

Iawalleyeguy

Junior Member
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Oct 13, 2021
Messages
23
300 spine on the Easton axis it's much harder to have too stiff of an arrow, than it is to have too flimsy an arrow
 

Idkwhyimhere

Newbie
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Oct 4, 2021
Messages
9
I shoot carbon xpress dstroyer mx hunter, .325 spine, 125 grain G5 striker 2. Gives me 13% foc. We both have the same draw length etc while I’m shooting 65lbs. That’s what works for me. I think you may have already went too far down the rabbit hole and would be best suited outside practicing.
 

Titan_Bow

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Dec 10, 2015
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793
Location
Broomfield, CO
In my opinion, I would not invest in Iron Wills, especially being new to archery and bow hunting. There simply is no real benefit to them over many other cut on contact heads. Sure they are higher quality materials, but a sharp broadhead is a sharp broadhead when it’s put in the right place on a whitetail deer. I also would not dare change up my arrow setup that drastically this late in the year! If your arrows are flying good right now, I would be putting all my effort and time into hunting, not messing with my arrows.


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Iawalleyeguy

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Oct 13, 2021
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Titan has great advise I made the mistake of changing my setup this late before and it cost me.
 

crob1511

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May 9, 2021
Messages
7
IMO, your arrow setup is the most important part of your setup. Arrow flight is number 1, so make sure you can shoot bullets and I would bareshaft out to the distance you feel comfortable hunting at. This includes with broad heads. If your looking on building a new setup for arrow I would highly suggest 300 spine or stiffer because of your draw length. If you can spend the money on a quality broadhead, do it. Quality steel is worth it. Edge retention is more important that what people give credit for. Valkyrie, iron will, day six, cutthroat, tuffheads, all good choices. I would suggest putting more weight into the head than the insert. Another thing is shot placement isn’t quite an absolute. You can hope for a perfect shot but animals are unpredictable so build an arrow for worst case scenario. 475 and up should be plenty with a perfect tune and sharp broadhead!
 

Wiscat

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Oct 5, 2016
Messages
104
For me I think the Iron Will + heavy arrow is overkill on whitetails. My last 7 (6 mature bucks (Wisconsin deer) and 1-4.5 yo doe) have been with at Gravedigger cut on contact. I liked them better prior to Bloodsport but they both seem to kill the same. Shooting a 425 grain arrow @285 I'm picking up the arrow well beyond the deer on a broadside shot from 30-45 yards. Also with the steep angles you are shooting most whitetails I like the big cut of the Mechanical. Last year I killed a nice 11 on a hard going away @31 yards from 22' up; entered the rear of the backstrap and the arrow lodged in the chest plate.(What a devistaing shot if you are high enough. liver, lungs and heart.) I can't imagine needing a 600gr arrow and a super head.
 

WCB

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Jun 12, 2019
Messages
1,782
No need to over think it. As far as spine I would lean towards stiffer as you can add weight to help if they end up indeed to stiff. Other than that your arrow choice will work and any decently built fixed head will work.

No way I'm spending $30ish dollars per broadhead. If you want a cut on contact type head get a couple packs of Slick Trick ViperTricks. You will be money ahead by $20ish dollars and have 8 broadheads instead of 3.
 

kbeard2

Newbie
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Nov 15, 2021
Messages
4
What is the general consensus on BH tuning? I just have a whisper biscuit. Do I just adjust it slightly until field point and BH are grouping nicely?
 
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