Arrows for elk?

ahatclif

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Mar 13, 2017
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89
Location
Nebraska
Planning my first hunt in September.
I have owned a bow for less than 4 months.
I am pretty comfortable at 30 yards.
I can get 80% of my arrows in a 6 inch circle at 40 yards.
I am getting better from 50 yards but I still have some outliers.

Up to this point I have been shooting Cabelas-branded Easton arrows (out of the box) with a 100 grain field tip and Scheels-branded Gold-Tip arrows with 100gm field tip. Depending on what the nocks and fletchings add, I assume that my current arrows are around 350 grains. I assume that my marksmanship shortfalls are still primarily about my technique. I think I am currently about 64 pounds of draw weight. I am hoping to increase that but only if I can do so comfortably.

Most of the brands and arrow lingo that I read on here flies right over my head. Can I use these arrows on the hunt? If not, is there an intro-level arrow that I can use easily without have to stress about after market add-ons, FOC, etc?

Thanks.
 

D_Eightch

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Sep 10, 2016
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North Dakota
Do you have a local archery shop or archery club? Some of these things are better to pick a persons brain in person.

I will be shooting an arrow that comes in just over 500 grains this year. For me, thick skinned, thick boned animals should get a heavy arrow at a pretty good click with the sharpest broadhead possible.

Not going to get into my ethical views of taking shots at animals, but from your post it sounds like you should really get in with a local club and have some guidance and practice, practice, practice.
 

hobbes

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Jun 6, 2012
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1,551
A few things:

1. Extending your range is great, but there is nothing wrong with having a 40 yard limit. I'd focus on improving your 40 yard groups and perfecting everything shorter than that from multiple shooting positions (standing, kneeling, downward angles, upward angles, etc.). You may accomplish better 40 yard groups by practicing at 50, but I wouldn't plan on settling with what you have at 40 just because you think you need to be shooting farther. Regardless of what may be said, archery is still a close in game.

2. It sounds like you are shooting two different arrow combinations, Eastons and Gold Tip. I'd settle on one arrow combination (it's not clear which arrows you are shooting since both companies make an assortment of arrows) that works with your draw length and bow weight. You should visit a pro shop to ensure that your set up is correct if you aren't familiar with this process. If I was going with a new set up altogether, I'd go with a little heavier arrow set up in the 400ish plus range. If the arrows you are shooting are of sufficient quality then it would be simple enough to increase the head to a 125 gr, adding weight and increasing foc if needed.

3. 64 lbs is plenty out of modern bows. If it's a newer model it's blowing by what 80 lb bows could do 20 years ago. That's a generalization, but you get the point. If you can go up without affecting your shooting and still comfortably draw from multiple positions then go for it, but I wouldn't worry about it. I think you'd be better served with an increase in arrow weight if you decide your current arrows aren't working.

4. If you've not done it, have a qualified shooter at a pro shop evaluate your shooting form. It's better to start out right than wait several years after developing bad habits then ask for help. Bad habits are hard to break if you go too far down that road (not impossible).
 

hobbes

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Jun 6, 2012
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I said a "few" but considering you've only been shooting a short while, I'd recommend seeking assistance ,at least researching, tuning for broadhead flight. Even if you are shooting expandables and they hit where your field points do, you still need to tune your arrow flight to make sure you have good arrow flight.
 
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ahatclif

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Mar 13, 2017
Messages
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Location
Nebraska
Thanks. There's only one club locally but I haven't been in-touch with them. The closest thing that we have to a pro-shop is Scheels.

As far as the arrows go. I bought one box at Cabelas and one at Scheels. I haven't shot broad heads yet but I get very similar results between the two with field points. My current arrows are 8.4 gpi & 29 inches long. With a 100 grain tip, they are 343 grains plus whatever is added by the nock, fletchings and if the inserts have any weight.

Distance-wise. I mostly shoot at 50 yards because that seems to tighten my 20-40 yard groups. My plan for September is probably a 40 yard max regardless of how well I shoot between now and then.

I will check out some other arrow option plus I got some 100 grain G5 Montec off Ebay but I will at least consider trying some 125s if needed.
 
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ahatclif

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Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
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Location
Nebraska
I said a "few" but considering you've only been shooting a short while, I'd recommend seeking assistance ,at least researching, tuning for broadhead flight. Even if you are shooting expandables and they hit where your field points do, you still need to tune your arrow flight to make sure you have good arrow flight.

Thanks for the advice. For sure I am not ready to hunt today. I was planning doing my broadhead tuning after I have had a chance to shoot for several more weeks. I also have no illusions about my likelihood of success but I am going to head out there nonetheless.
 

ElkNut1

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Feb 25, 2012
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Idaho
Since you are in search of a good quality elk arrow that will suit your needs at 64# all the way to 70# if you increase draw weight in time I would suggest this setup here!

Pick up the Victory RIP arrows in 350 spine, cut to 28" -- This arrow will tune at your draw weight & up to 70# as needed. Add a 50 grain insert to front end & a 100 grain Exodus Qad broadhead.

Victory RIP 28" arrow - 246 grains

Insert 50 grains

Fletches (3 - 2" blazers) 18 grains

Nock 10 grains

Broadhead 100 grains

Total arrow weight = 424 grains!

This is a great penetrating elk arrow with your setup! Tune it & go hunting!

ElkNut1
 

ndbwhunter

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Jun 4, 2014
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North Dakota
As others have stated previously, you should seek out assistance from your local club. Ask questions, but make sure you're asking the right person. Lots of people are willing to give advice, but not all of it is right. As far as your "pro shop" goes, take their advice with a grain of salt. That's all we have here as well, and most don't know their head from their ass. Do yourself a favor and spend some time on Archerytalk Archery & Bowhunting News Bowhunting archerytalk.com. Read up on form, draw length, etc. Search for the "nuts and bolts of archery" in google or archerytalk. Lots of good information to get you going on the right track.

As for your arrows, the heavier the better. Look for something with high GPI in a 350 spine. The black eagle rampage are my arrow of choice. I shoot a 29" 250 spine at 70lbs with a 31" DL. Arrow weight is right at 500 grains with the 56 grain half outsert and a 100 grain tip.
 

roadrunner

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May 10, 2015
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Timberline
A friend of mine shoots 65#, 27" arrows that weigh 385 grs tipped with a Slick Trick Standard and has no problems shooting through elk. You have a lot of variability in a setup...
 

sneaky

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Few questions since I don't think you mentioned them. What spine arrows are you shooting now? What draw length? What bow? Only reason I ask which bow is to figure out if it's a hard cam, medium cam, single cam etc. It's just good advice to make your elk arrows 400 grains or heavier. Good advice to find someone close to ask about these things. Spend as much money as you can afford on arrows. Between those and your broadheads they are the only thing that touch the animal. Straighter the better. ArcheryTalk is a good resource, but they act like a bunch of middle schoolers over there at times.
 

2blade

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Jan 4, 2015
Messages
366
Few questions since I don't think you mentioned them. What spine arrows are you shooting now? What draw length? What bow? Only reason I ask which bow is to figure out if it's a hard cam, medium cam, single cam etc. It's just good advice to make your elk arrows 400 grains or heavier. Good advice to find someone close to ask about these things. Spend as much money as you can afford on arrows. Between those and your broadheads they are the only thing that touch the animal. Straighter the better. ArcheryTalk is a good resource, but they act like a bunch of middle schoolers over there at times.

Good advice right here. If you want to post up this info I can run the numbers in Archers Advantage and OT2 and give you a good starting point.
 

Where's Bruce?

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If you visit archerytalk, stick to the Western Bow Hunting board. The "other guys" are primarily treesquatters and not elk chasers.
 
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DeepMauka

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2013
Messages
159
Planning my first hunt in September.
I have owned a bow for less than 4 months.
I am pretty comfortable at 30 yards.
I can get 80% of my arrows in a 6 inch circle at 40 yards.
I am getting better from 50 yards but I still have some outliers.

Up to this point I have been shooting Cabelas-branded Easton arrows (out of the box) with a 100 grain field tip and Scheels-branded Gold-Tip arrows with 100gm field tip. Depending on what the nocks and fletchings add, I assume that my current arrows are around 350 grains. I assume that my marksmanship shortfalls are still primarily about my technique. I think I am currently about 64 pounds of draw weight. I am hoping to increase that but only if I can do so comfortably.

Most of the brands and arrow lingo that I read on here flies right over my head. Can I use these arrows on the hunt? If not, is there an intro-level arrow that I can use easily without have to stress about after market add-ons, FOC, etc?

Thanks.
I used to shoot "cheap" arrows when I first started...and many years thereafter. Thought it was me with the outliers. Never thought there might be an inconsistency in the dozen or so arrows I had, and always blamed myself. Finally stepped up to a closer tolerance arrow (Easton Axis), and my "outliers" dropped. Yes, I can improve my technique and form. I also could benefit from practicing more, but my groups became more consistent when I spent a little more on a closer tolerance arrow. Food for thought.
 
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ahatclif

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Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
89
Location
Nebraska
Good advice from everyone so far.

I am shooting a Diamond Edge SB-1.
My draw length is 28 inches.
My draw weight is 64 lbs (I think).
Currently shooting a 400 spine.

I think I started out at 58 lb draw weight and the 400 spine was the correct choice. With my draw length I am probably getting close to moving to 350 spine but I am not sure exactly when the change is warranted.

I have yet to shoot with broadheads. I own some G5 Montec SS 100 grain. I am planning on using those unless there is a great reason not to.
 

2blade

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Jan 4, 2015
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Archers Advantage says the current setup is a little stiff. Using 125 heads on the bemans, thats what cabelas arrows are, would be perfect. That would get you over 400grs total as well.
 
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ahatclif

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Mar 13, 2017
Messages
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Location
Nebraska
I appreciate you looking this stuff up for me.

When you say my setup is stiff...I am not sure how that is defined or if there is any easy remedy. I assume stiff is not ideal.

Either way. Thanks for the help.
 

2blade

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Jan 4, 2015
Messages
366
I appreciate you looking this stuff up for me.

When you say my setup is stiff...I am not sure how that is defined or if there is any easy remedy. I assume stiff is not ideal.

Either way. Thanks for the help.

stiff refers to arrow spine, which is the stiffness of the arrow shaft. when you are to stiff or to weak, accuracy and energy imparted to the arrow suffers. On the weak side the arrow flexes to much, on the stiff side it doesn't flex enough.
 
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