Asolo Boots, Fugitive or Sasslong?

HellsCanyon

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Well, I was able to sell my Kenetreks, and while in town today was able to try on some Asolo Fugitives. I was very surprised at how stiff they were for being so short (I usually wear 8"+ high hunting boots) and the heel box right away was noticeably better on my foot).

I was not able to try on the Sasslongs but I assume that they would fit me feet the same.

Now the decision is which model to buy? Do you guys prefer a partial leather upper or a full leather upper and why? Here are links to both on STP. Thanks!

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/asolo-fugitive-gore-tex-hiking-boots-waterproof-for-men~p~83990/?filterString=mens-footwear~d~11/&colorFamily=07

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/asolo-sasslong-gore-tex-backpacking-boots-waterproof-nubuck-for-men~p~83043/?filterString=mens-footwear~d~11/&colorFamily=05

Mike
 

dotman

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I have only used the sassalongs out of the two, I think they are perfect. Kind of stiff at first but nice once broken in after 20 or so miles. The heal is narrow on the Asolos but works great for my average feet. I like the all leather, I have the Asolo FSN 95's that are not all leather and have worked great also.

The sassalongs have a big toe box but that doesn't seem to cause any problems. My FSN's have a toebox more like a sneaker that makes them harder to wear with a thicker sock. Even with the big toebox my foot does not move around.
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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I went ahead and ordered the sasslongs... Reason being is they have the full rand protection and my gaitors sometimes catch the inside of the oposite boot and they need some protection in that area. Only 4 oz. heavier and I think the leather won't get as water-logged as the heavyweight cordura on the fugitives. I was also able to order two pairs of smartwool merino medium hiker socks and had the total come out to right at $200 which is exactly what I got for my kenetreks. Alls well that ends well!

While we are on this topic, I'm still curious to those others out there, why do you prefer a cordura/leather upper vs an all leather upper or vice versa?

Mike
 
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HellsCanyon

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I stood in the water for 5 minutes with the sasslongs and when I stepped out they did not hold any water, they stayed dry.
In my opinion and I mean you no offense, but that is not a very good test for a boot. Most of my water-resistant boots will come close to passing that test, and ALL of my waterproof boots will. The real test is hiking in conditions where your boots are constantly wet, and are being worked from hiking. The more flexing and work that boot is doing, the more likely it is to help work that water through your waterproof membrane.

I NEVER worry about getting my feet wet when crossing streams, but I do worry about them when walking through morning dew wet meadows and vegetation.

Mike
 

dotman

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In my opinion and I mean you no offense, but that is not a very good test for a boot. Most of my water-resistant boots will come close to passing that test, and ALL of my waterproof boots will. The real test is hiking in conditions where your boots are constantly wet, and are being worked from hiking. The more flexing and work that boot is doing, the more likely it is to help work that water through your waterproof membrane.

I NEVER worry about getting my feet wet when crossing streams, but I do worry about them when walking through morning dew wet meadows and vegetation.

Mike
My FSN's were good in wet conditions all day long without my feet getting wet, I think the sassalongs will perform just as well.
 

luke moffat

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In my opinion and I mean you no offense, but that is not a very good test for a boot. Most of my water-resistant boots will come close to passing that test, and ALL of my waterproof boots will. The real test is hiking in conditions where your boots are constantly wet, and are being worked from hiking. The more flexing and work that boot is doing, the more likely it is to help work that water through your waterproof membrane.

I NEVER worry about getting my feet wet when crossing streams, but I do worry about them when walking through morning dew wet meadows and vegetation.

Mike
Huh, that's when I seem to get my boots the wettest, of course Im going over the boot tops could have something to do with that ;)
 

a3dhunter

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In my opinion and I mean you no offense, but that is not a very good test for a boot. Most of my water-resistant boots will come close to passing that test, and ALL of my waterproof boots will. The real test is hiking in conditions where your boots are constantly wet, and are being worked from hiking. The more flexing and work that boot is doing, the more likely it is to help work that water through your waterproof membrane.

I NEVER worry about getting my feet wet when crossing streams, but I do worry about them when walking through morning dew wet meadows and vegetation.

Mike
Kind of hard to do that test in the middle of summer without any rain, especially if you live in the panhandle of Texas.
My last pair of waterproof boots wouldn't hold water out if you spit on them.
The streams you cross must not be very deep.......and you must not fall off the slippery rocks like me! ;)
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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Luke, I seen your videos.... you have deeper creeks than me ;)

And when I say crossing creeks I mean more streams than rivers ;) maybe 4-10" deep!

And yeah I agree the panhandle of TX might be tough to do some water tests like I mention ;)

Mike
 

fillthefreezer

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slushy snow is what seems to get my feet wet. they do ok a few hours but eventually they end up saturated. especially when kicking footholds
 
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HellsCanyon

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slushy snow is what seems to get my feet wet. they do ok a few hours but eventually they end up saturated. especially when kicking footholds
That is the type of situation I'm talking about. Extended work in wet conditions. I've never had a pair of boots that were waterproof for more than two seasons either. Seems like the GoreTex breaks down after so many miles.

Mike
 

JG358

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I NEVER worry about getting my feet wet when crossing streams, but I do worry about them when walking through morning dew wet meadows and vegetation.

Mike
In those conditions, its usually because pants leach water to your sock and get your boots wet, not because your boot leak. I have 6 year old gortex boots that indeed are still waterproof but if I'm not wearing gators, my feet get soaked.
 
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HellsCanyon

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Wouldn't surprise me if that were the case with my microtex, but even wearing waterproof pants I've had boots soak through on the toes before... Granted I only typically oil my boots about twice a year so after 3 years its probably more so my fault than the boots.

Mike
 

bbrown

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Mike - How are you liking the Sassalongs? They are stiff to start but the more I wear mine - the more I like them especially for the early season.
 
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HellsCanyon

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Unfortunately I only got to wear them for an evening before having to leave for business. First impression is that I will definitely like them. They are for sure a bit stiff right now but I'm going to hit them with some obenaufs when I get home and take em for a hike!

I also think its about time to get my orthotics recovered. Been strong for two years but starting to come apart...

Mike
 
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HellsCanyon

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Well.... I might be in the market for yet another pair of boots. Just got back from my third multi-day trip on the Sasslongs and while I'm impressed with the boots and have gotten NO BLISTERS, there is a significant pressure point on my right heel that has failed to break in.

I've tried different insoles as well as my orthodics thinking it may be that my heel was at the wrong height in the heel pocket. Nothing has worked and now that I have my orthodics rebuilt my heel is a touch higher than normal and the problem is a tiny bit more pronounced.

If you feel on the inside of the boot, there is a bit of padding on either side of the foot box, but as soon as you get to the heel section, the padding disappears and its hard/stiff as heck. When I'm going up hill and am digging my toes in, there is a pressure point right on the inside portion of my right heel. Feels like there's a dull rock in there or something that is bruising my heel. Interesting though as I've had no slippage issues, no blisters, boots are properly sized, and its only my right instead of my left. My left is actually extremely comfortable. I'm wondering if I don't have a tiny bone spur or something that is causing the problem.

Got a hunt this weekend and depending on weather I may take my old worn down Irish Setters that have tons of Shoe-Goo and worn tread but at least I know they are comfy! This is the first year I've 'stepped up' to top quality well known boots (first Kenetrek, now Asolo) and have had troubles with both. We'll see what happens but hunting season is here so I may just deal with it...

Mike
 

dotman

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Hmm, something is weird, neither of mine have that problem. Wonder if you have 1 bad boot or like you said a bone spur. What insoles have you tried?
 
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HellsCanyon

HellsCanyon

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Nothing fancy or expensive. I've tried a pair of nice factory Wolverine insoles I had laying around, the factory Asolo insoles, as well as a nice pair of thing gel insoles (not sure of brand) and I've tried a combination of any two at the same time to try and get my heel at a different level in the heel pocket.

After 5 days on my antelope trip I didn't even want to stand on a steep sidehill cause my heel felt very bruised. But as I've said, zero blisters, just a big pressure point. I did notice yesterday after putting in my newly recovered orthodics that my left heel was raised up enough to get that same type of pressure point. So I think I'm on the right track with thinking it's the shape or depth of heel pocket that is causing my problem. Going to go down to a local shoe shop today where they have backpacking boots and try some different Asolo models and maybe pick up a pair of nicer insoles though I'd rather use my orthodics...

Mike
 
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HellsCanyon

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Well just did a quick look through Sierra trading post to see what they offered... Went ahead and pulled the trigger on the Hanwag Dakota GTX's and they'll be here thursday. Hard to argue for $157 to my door and hopefully third time is the charm with another "big name" boot company.

Going to clean up my Asolo's and put 'em up for sale.

Mike
 
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