Backpacking newbie. Gear questions

schwaf

Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
78
Location
CO
I am a cot guy as well, but wont use a pad. They always seem to have a hole in them shortly after I get them and they never hold air for me. I also hunt in the colder seasons so they are also just full of cold air anyway and that doesnt help me get any warmer. Instead of an air pad, I will generally run a foam pad, which Ive also used for glassing. I use quilts, but more specifically a “convert” quilt by Enlightenment Equipment that can be used as a bag, quilt or blanket. I have both a 30* down and synthetic version. Location will determine which bag I bring unless its going to be real cold I will bring both. These pack down way better than a 0* bag.
Do you double up the quilts during the colder months? How do you compare these to a typical mummy bag? I've been curious about quilts.
 

dmozer74

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2020
Messages
17
I’m a quilt convert. I bought a hammock gear quilt to pair with my Big Agnes sleeping pad. For my tent I have a Kelty Gunnison 2. It’s a lower budget setup that I’ve put together over the course of 2-3 years, but it works well. All in I have about $450 or so. I do have a Kelty Cosmic Down 20 degree bag that I can pair up with my 20 degree quilt for really cold nights.
 

justinspicher

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2012
Messages
3,468
Location
Colorado
Do you double up the quilts during the colder months? How do you compare these to a typical mummy bag? I've been curious about quilts.
I do. I used to wear my puffy jacket and pants in my quilt, but it gets tight. The down quilt goes in my synthetic and then it all goes in a bivy. I run a really lightweight bivy (mostly to keep everything together) and so far no issues.

I like the quilt more than a mummy due to the ability to use it for more than just sleeping. I use it alot to keep warm when glassing, as the lack of a footbox is handy.
 

schwaf

Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
78
Location
CO
I’m a quilt convert. I bought a hammock gear quilt to pair with my Big Agnes sleeping pad. For my tent I have a Kelty Gunnison 2. It’s a lower budget setup that I’ve put together over the course of 2-3 years, but it works well. All in I have about $450 or so. I do have a Kelty Cosmic Down 20 degree bag that I can pair up with my 20 degree quilt for really cold nights.
Nothing wrong with quality budget! I started with the same bag and tent (and a walmart yoga mat that was quickly upgraded). My gunnison 2 has been going strong for 10 years, and it's easily got another 10 in it. Love my Kelty gear.
 

schwaf

Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
78
Location
CO
I do. I used to wear my puffy jacket and pants in my quilt, but it gets tight. The down quilt goes in my synthetic and then it all goes in a bivy. I run a really lightweight bivy (mostly to keep everything together) and so far no issues.

I like the quilt more than a mummy due to the ability to use it for more than just sleeping. I use it alot to keep warm when glassing, as the lack of a footbox is handy.
Interesting... I'll keep that in mind. It might be the right move to lighten my load. Hows the pack size/weight of 2 quilts vs 1 0*bag?
 

justinspicher

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2012
Messages
3,468
Location
Colorado
I can really compress them down but generally I just stuff them in the bottom of my pack and put everything else I am taking on top and let the gear compress them. I dont take much to the woods so its not a big deal to me.
 

BamuleyID

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2021
Messages
13
Location
Idaho
I agree with those who have mentioned quilts! I don't use a hammock though. All that fluff under you in a traditional sleeping back is compressed and does not add much to your warmth (R-value) so quilts negate that and save you a lot on weight. I have made my own and never bought them. I'm sure if I forked over some more cash I'd be even more impressed since my craftsmanship is on par with a monkey running a sewing machine. Simple to make and WAY WAY more cost-effective. Plus, you can add anything you want and tailor it to your sleeping style. I'm a side sleeper with restless legs so I add a little more room where I want it. Down or synthetic insulation. I only have synthetic and don't want to worry about wetting anything out. Save money for other items. Layer up with clothing and a liner if you need extra warmth. I'm good down to 10 degrees or so...haven't been below that yet.
 

mrbillbrown

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2013
Messages
3,033
Location
Edmond, OK
Froze my butt off using a Big Agnes Insulated Air Core pad (that was supposedly rated to 15*) during a Sept archery elk trip in CO. Temps were in the mid 20’s on the Mtn. Immediately sold that pad and replaced it with a Thermarest Xtherm pad and haven’t looked back. Used it for 4-5yrs now with zero issues. I use mine year round.
 

JJJ

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
19
Neoair xtherm is very comfy, packs small and is light. I messed around with cheaper pads and yea, just get the good stuff.

Kelty 2p tent was $150 10-12 years ago. Has a vestibule for gear, enough room inside for me to be comfy. Cheap, reliable, durable. No issues in that time.

bags are a whole ballgame. I really like the valandre Bloody Mary. I also have the shocking blue but it’s for really cold temps.
the Bloody Mary has been excellent.

Moosejaw has excellent sales on these items from time to time. Like 20% off
 

swanny

Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
82
Location
WA
Any mat brand worth buying will have an ASTM rating for their R-Value - this means that their R-Value is certified, 3rd party. Same goes for sleeping bags and their EN Rating, again this is 3rd party rated. Currently for mats EXPED, Thermarest, Sea To Summit, Nemo, and Big Agnes all use ASTM for their sleeping mats. EXPED has actually been testing 3rd party since 2001 and posting these numbers just as long. Our founder played a very large role, that took entirely to long to get other brands on board with 3rd party r-values.

Quilts will not qualify for EN ratings, so you'll most likely buy "warmer" than needed. In the NW, that means a 20F and maybe a 10F. Good thing about the quilt is versatility though, it's used like a blanket so you can adjust a little easier than a sleeping bag.

IF it hasn't been mentioned yet, you can add a closed cell foam mat under your inflatable pad. This will add anywhere from typically 1.5-2.2 in r-value for you. So say your inflatable is 3.0, and your CCF is 2.0, all of a sudden you are at 5 which gets you in to 4-season temps.
 
Top