Backtension Releases

Darkhorse

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
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10
I've read a lot of good things about them here and elsewhere. Who uses one?? Which one?? Do you use it while hunting?? Thanks for the input!
 

cali_hornhunter

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Apr 12, 2012
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542
Location
Tehama County, CA
I don't use one but I've tried shooting them and it takes a lot of practice IMO. It was difficult for me to get it down lol so I just stuck with my Wiseguy don't really know a lot about them other than I had a rough time getting one down lol
 

RosinBag

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Feb 27, 2012
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Location
Roseville, CA.
I shoot a Stan Shoot Off Quatro. I use one for target and hunting, although my hunting one has a stiffer spring tension.
 

brettpsu

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
134
I suffered from target panic for years before I made the switch to a back tension release. What a huge difference it was for me. It was not an easy transition but after a year or so your will see the improvement. I had to use a coach to make sure my form was correct. If you start out using bad form you will suffer greatly. I highly recommend either a professional coach or following an instructional book to the T. I used Larry Wise, professional coach and author but also heard great things about Bernie Pellerite books.

This would be the perfect time of the year to make the switch, lots of up close pratice time.

I use a Tru Ball Sweet Spot because it has a "safety" on it.

FYI. Don't let anyone tell you that its wrong to hunt with a backtension release aid. I know many guys who are much more effictient hunters now that they shoot back tension.
 

Rolo

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Dec 29, 2012
Messages
69
I use a hinge or spike release occassionally while hunting, depending on the circumstances. I use a thumb button a majority of the time. Regardless of which release is in my hand, I attempt to execute the shot using 'back tension'. I understand what you are asking (I think) and that relates to the style of release, rather than the method of making it fire. Most any release, including index triggers, can be shot with 'back tension'.

My thumb button is a TRU Absolute 360. For a hinge, which is what I carry now, it is a TRU HT3. When I carried a spike, it was everything from a Carter Attension, Slider, and Whalen's Hooker. The hinge suits me best.

No problems using a hinge for hunting, but if you are going to use it the way that it is intended, you won't have any 'control' over the shot. It goes when it goes. You can control them like any other release, but their consistency and accuracy, at least mine, suffers as a result.
 

HellsCanyon

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May 29, 2012
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Lewiston ID
The one thing that scares me for hunting is those situations where you've been at full draw for 60+ seconds and you're muscles are starting to fatigue and you may trip the release premature. Another situation I don't like is if you've had to run up the ridge to get a shot or have a situation where you are out of breath and you're pins can't get steady. I don't want to be surprised by the shot I want to be able to time my release for when I'm on that micro "swing through" target zone. Same thing we do for awkward positional rifle stages. If you can't get a good rest you have to time the trigger break when that cross hair is swinging through your target. I've never shot a back tension so these could be delusional situations but that's the image I have in my head... lol

Mike
 

Elc1973

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Joined
Dec 27, 2012
Messages
91
Location
Fairbanks, AK
I shoot the carter can't think of the name of it but I bought it when I had target panic so I could teach myself to use back tension to trigger the shot. I looked at a lot of them but this one has a safety so I don't punch myself in the face when drawing! Plus I'm partial to the carter quickie that I use for hunting during the winter il use the back tension release just to ensure I'm doing things right and to teach myself how a good shot feels.
 

evan williams

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Jan 28, 2012
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Location
Colorado Springs
I've got/used them all! :) Currently, I have a TruBall HT, TruBall BT Gold, and Scott Longhorn 3 finger (ALL hinges) in my release pouch for target and 3D. I plan on adding a Scott Longhorn Hunter to my arsenal. I also have been hunting with a Carter Quickie (index trigger) and occasionally a Carter Target 3 (thumb button). All are VERY accurate when shot with the same consistency and form. Squeezing or pulling through your shot rather than PUNCHING a trigger.

A hinge trains me to hold and relax and execute MY shot every time with repeatable consistency.

I haven't hunted with my hinge's YET because there are times when a more aggressive shot is needed and I felt that a hinge would hinder that, however, after looking back at my shots over the past few years I have had plenty of time to execute a well aimed shot and since I use a hinge 80% of the time I am going to play with a hinge for hunting this season (SCOTT Longhorn Hunter).
 

HellsCanyon

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Evan,
Can you comment on my concerns listed in my post? Are they legit or am I dreaming them up? As I said I've only ever shot a trigger release and it's served me well but always looking to improve my archery game... thanks!

Mike
 

Maxhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
302
Location
Wyoming
I use a Carter Little Bighorn hinge for targets. I prefer a thumb release for hunting and use the same method as the hinge to execute the shot. It'll definitely help your shooting IMO. The key to getting use one is too not setting it so it'll go off when pulling back. A lot of folks don't like them because it goes off when pulling back and they get punched in the face. I recommend practicing at 3-4 yards at first. It doesn't take long and you'll not be so apprehensive about using one. Below is how you should probably set-up and shoot a hinge. Hope this helps!

Hinge setup:

1. set it to the slowest position and then draw your bow with all fingers where they all have the same tension on them including the thumb peg. Down draw and repeat around 5 or so times and do not I repeat, DO NOT TRY TO FIRE THE RELEASE. The whole point here is to feel what it is like to pull the bow with all fingers equally.

2. now speed up the release just a little and draw the bow and just let off the thumb pressure, do not do any of the back tension stuff. Just release the thumb pressure and see if the bow fires. If it doesn't down draw and speed up the release just a little and repeat until when you let off the thumb pressure it fires. Fire a few arrows like this to make sure the first one wasn't a fluke and then slow down the release just a little so that it won't fire when you let off the thumb pressure.

3. Hinge setup is complete for now and over the next month you can fine tune it to the perfect speed where you can draw with all fingers and release thumb pressure and get the perfect release.


Firing sequence:

1. come to anchor and apply a constant amount of back tension against the wall and never add or subtract the amount during the shot and just put the pin on the bulleseye and check the bubble and get your peep lined up with the sight ring. Don't start aiming yet.

2. now at the same time you take the pressure off the thumb peg start aiming.

3. now just relax your fingers and in the next 3 seconds the bow will fire so just keep relaxing the fingers and basically let your fingers stretch out and during this time maintain the constant back tension and the release will fire.


This is a awesome firing sequence and it is very repeatable and it doesn't require moving the elbow or squeezing the rhomboids to fire the release, the back tension is just a tool to make sure the shot feels the same each time. The firing of the release is achieved by having the hinge setup correctly so it is close to going off and the relaxation of the fingers takes care of that. Over the first month your job is to let down every time the firing sequence takes longer than 3 seconds for the bow to go off and start over, never force it. If it repeatedly takes longer than 3 seconds then speed up the release just a little and if it releases to quick right after aiming then slow it down a little until you get that perfect speed.

I shoot more than one release and I shoot smooth moons and clicker moons and right now I am shooting the clicker better, when I come to anchor and take the pressure off the thumb peg my release clicks and then I start aiming and withing three seconds my release fires. It is the same thing as I do with the smooth moon.
 
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