Bag vs quilt; nemo vs HG

Archer_32

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Jan 6, 2020
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27
I'm looking to get into backpack camping having recently moved to Montana but I'm concerned about sleeping bags vs quilts. I'm a large american, 6' 250# with a broad chest and I have trouble fitting in some of the bags available in person at the local big box store (read I fit but its uncomfortable).

I have narrowed it down, I think, to the Nemo disco 15 sleeping bag or the hammock gear econ burrow 10 degree long wide ground quilt. While I'll be camping mostly in the spring, summer, fall my sleeping pad has a r value of 4.1 and I'm usually a warm sleeper but since I'm just getting into this stuff I need equipment that I can use year round as much as possible. These two bags appear to cost relatively the same amount and weight is comparable (I will also be backpack hunting). I guess my only real hesitation with the quilt is how warm it will be given the opening vs the sleeping bag. Thoughts? Suggestions?

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ljalberta

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Dec 7, 2015
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No personal use with the Hammock Gear quilts. But, I would say, be aware their wide model is only 55". I'm not sure if that's the width when the fabric is cut (resulting in even less finished width) or if that's the final width, but either way, it may not be wide enough if you like a little room to sprawl or move around without letting all the heat escape. For instance, I personally use an EE quilt in the 56" wide (but finished width is closer to 52/53") and I'd prefer even wider on my next quilt. I am 5'9" 160-175lbs. I am quite the active sleeper though.

Tough to have 1 bag do all seasons well in my experience. I'd say if the quilt does work for you, and your focus is more when the nighttime temperatures hover around or above freezing, I'd get the quilt and be prepared to supplement it during the colder times (I've used a 15oz costco down throw before that worked pretty nicely, as well as wearing your insulation layers in always an option). If you'd prefer a little more warmth, or the temperatures will often be below freezing at night, I'd personally go for the bag.

Also, I'm sure your familiar with how most sleeping bag rating are done, but if not I'd suggest a little research into it. In general, most companies rate their bags for the lowest temperature where an average 25 year old male, wearing full base layers and a sleeping pad R value of 5, can sleep for 8 straight hours in a curled position without waking. That doesn't mean they're warm, and I've yet to find a pad/bag combo where I can sleep in a curled position.
 
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Archer_32

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Jan 6, 2020
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27
No personal use with the Hammock Gear quilts. But, I would say, be aware their wide model is only 55". I'm not sure if that's the width when the fabric is cut (resulting in even less finished width) or if that's the final width, but either way, it may not be wide enough if you like a little room to sprawl or move around without letting all the heat escape. For instance, I personally use an EE quilt in the 56" wide (but finished width is closer to 52/53") and I'd prefer even wider on my next quilt. I am 5'9" 160-175lbs. I am quite the active sleeper though.

Tough to have 1 bag do all seasons well in my experience. I'd say if the quilt does work for you, and your focus is more when the nighttime temperatures hover around or above freezing, I'd get the quilt and be prepared to supplement it during the colder times (I've used a 15oz costco down throw before that worked pretty nicely, as well as wearing your insulation layers in always an option). If you'd prefer a little more warmth, or the temperatures will often be below freezing at night, I'd personally go for the bag.

Also, I'm sure your familiar with how most sleeping bag rating are done, but if not I'd suggest a little research into it. In general, most companies rate their bags for the lowest temperature where an average 25 year old male, wearing full base layers and a sleeping pad R value of 5, can sleep for 8 straight hours in a curled position without waking. That doesn't mean they're warm, and I've yet to find a pad/bag combo where I can sleep in a curled position.
Thanks for your response! Yeah, I guess I'm looking more for three season use but while hunting in mountains in the fall I imagine it will get winterish. The quilt seems great for say 70-80% of my activities but a bag might be better when it really dips.

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Lando

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Jun 5, 2018
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Arizona
I'd go a bit wider than 55" for a ground quilt if you sleep on your side much. You can get a underground quilt xl bandit in either 60 or 65" wide.
 
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Archer_32

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Jan 6, 2020
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I'd go a bit wider than 55" for a ground quilt if you sleep on your side much. You can get a underground quilt xl bandit in either 60 or 65" wide.
I'll check it out! Thanks!

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badshot

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Nov 30, 2017
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Oregon
I am 6'1, 285lbs,and wear a 3xl jacket. I run the regular length and wide width 20 deg HG. With the pad straps I dont have any issues with it. I have and would recommend it to anyone that wants to get into quilts on a budget.
 

Beendare

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May 6, 2014
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I'm a pretty big guy too....warm sleeper.

I like a 20 deg 800 fill down bag thats big so I can move.

I use my bag as a quilt on the nights its above 45-50 deg....but like that I can zip it up when it gets colder. A little draft when its warmer is no big thing....drafty and cold is a biotch.

....
 

Bigboone1988

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Aug 28, 2018
Messages
90
Location
IL
Also take a look at katabatic quilts. I bought the flex 22° 6 foot wide and love it so far. Plenty of room to roll around without creating drafts. I am 5'10 200 lbs
 
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Archer_32

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Jan 6, 2020
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Thanks for the feedback everyone, I'm really leaning towards the quilts now. Now to decide hammock gear or ugq...

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wiiawiwb

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Nov 12, 2016
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675
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In the mountains
I have two Western Mountaineering bags and an EE (Enlightened Equipment) 10F quilt. I'll never go back to a sleeping in a bag unless it is 0F or less.

The XW EE 10F quilt is 64" across the shoulders so it provides ample space. I also got the XL as I think the added space all the way around allows for warmer conditions inside. If needed or desired, you can drawstring in the footbed and it will keep the cold air out.

http://enlightenedequipment.com/content/spec-sheets/revelation-10deg.jpg

If I were doing it again, I'd go with the 0F as it is a little over 4oz more in weight.

Nowadays, if I am expecting the cold to be 10F or lower, I use a 35F Western Mountaineering bag and the 10F quilt. Together they are exceedingly warm and I can remove or open one up allowing me to regulate the temperature better than using just my -5F WM bag.
 

wasatchcomm

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Mar 15, 2016
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579
Location
La Center, Wa.
i ordered another UGQ bandit quilt,, received it a few weeks ago, you want to make sure to add the
"dynamic tension control"
they have a XL bandit as well for wide 60" or 65"
with that combined with the pad attachment system they have,, you will not have any cold spots,
i am a toss and turn kind of sleeper and it wont matter with this system. these are really really really good bags as well
im a warm sleeper and i ordered the 10* bag with the fully insulated foot box, its a very very warm quilt
i was way to warm in 20 degree weather in it. in shorts
i have a EE quilt too, its a 20degree quilt its nice but IMO these UGQ quilts are top notch!
 

maverick

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Apr 5, 2012
Messages
172
Location
Oregon
UGQ Bandit XL in 65" wide is the way to go for a ground quilt if your a big guy. I'm 6'4" and the 78" long quilt with insulated foot box fits perfect.
 
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