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Bear Attacks Hunter & Guide Sep '18 Story

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Personally, I would never put 100% trust of my well being with someone else- guide, whatever. I take responsibility.


Yeah, easy to armchair QB this...terrible but its a worthy analysis as there are lessons here for guides, clients, DIY guys- all of us.

Have your weapon handy
Practice so you are quick/fluid with whatever weapon you chose to defend yourself before hand
Keep a shotgun- [or two] or long gun handy for the eventuality of getting an animal down
More guys at the site- the better
Use a spotter that continually scans for danger
Get the animal out asap...before you draw in those bears

My bet; 1/2 of the guys packing bear spray have never actually test fired a can.
 

4ester

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My bet; 1/2 of the guys packing bear spray have never actually test fired a can.

I have, and it will kill a coon!
Most have never read the instructions and done it. We have.

And if the wind switches during the test you are gonna get a taste of your own medicine. Lesson learned.


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Most have never read the instructions and done it. We have.

And if the wind switches during the test you are gonna get a taste of your own medicine. Lesson learned.


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I have tested mine, and was surprised by the volume that comes out of that thing. Also have a friend that wanted his wife to test it, just to know how to use it. I don't know it they weren't paying attention to the wind, but they both ended up getting hit with it pretty good. Took her like 4 hours to get over it. I have seen that they sell a neutralizer...
 
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One of the companies that makes bear spray also makes containers that have only inert ingredients. These containers can be used to learn how to quickly remove the trigger stop and to practice spraying the material.

I have seen these containers at Hunter Safety Classes. The students get a chance to use the "bear spray" and experience how it will spray, etc.

ClearCreek
 
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Personally, I would never put 100% trust of my well being with someone else- guide, whatever. I take responsibility.


Yeah, easy to armchair QB this...terrible but its a worthy analysis as there are lessons here for guides, clients, DIY guys- all of us.

Have your weapon handy
Practice so you are quick/fluid with whatever weapon you chose to defend yourself before hand
Keep a shotgun- [or two] or long gun handy for the eventuality of getting an animal down


Man you are spot on with the shotgun comment. If you are going in the next day to find an animal in Grizzly country it seems like a no brainer to pack a shotgun and have it next to you or in the hands of the client while you do work on the animal.
 
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My first post. Been lurking for awhile.

I guide in this same area, use the exact same trailhead and have ridden by Terrace mtn many times. I didn’t know Mr Uptain, but everything I’ve heard was good.

I know guides who don’t carry a weapon or spray. But I don’t know anyone who doesn’t carry something when going back in the next day. But it didn’t matter in this case. There were two cans of spray and one gun. And only one can was at the ready. That the spray worked is a little debatable, despite what game and fish says. I don’t think there really is a way to tell for sure if the spray really did make the sow leave, even if it was too late.

Even if someone had been standing guard it would still be easily possible for a bear to get on you before you knew it. Still I stress vigilance to myself and clients during these situations and actually really like having the horses or my dog close too. They probably ran onto the blood trail with the horses. And then tied them up to finish the tracking. Then once the elk was found just went to work which would be pretty normal.

I pretty much consider myself on my own even with a client in bear or other dangerous encounters. With the added responsibility of taking care of the client. Most clients are liabilities in these situations not assets.

I really wish Mark had had his glock on him. Chambered. He had the presence of mind to use the spray at some point. So he may not have panicked. Actually probably the opposite and saved the client. Just wish he could have responded with 16 rounds of 10mm.

There is definitely a culture of no chambered guns there. Mostly I think because many clients are not to be trusted with loaded guns. Know guys who pack revolvers who still won’t carry one under the hammer. Presumably from movie non sense and older guns that don’t have the safety mechanisms. Believe it or not.

I carry an 06 with 220s and when going back to a kill carry my .45 colt as well with modern loads.

I’ve been charged too. All I can say is one should spend some serious time mentally and physically preparing for a charge if you think you might experience one. Because you won’t have time to think.

I wish all the best for Mark’s family. Dang shame for his wife and kids. The story hit pretty close to home.
 
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Dang tough to rehash this after it was done. Here are my thoughts based solely on the words spoken in that report and by the client himself. The details of what was done wrong are obvious now. So, there is no need to debate the why, what, or the how's of what happened and, what needed to be done differently before the attack.

The attack happened. The client obviously dropped the magazine out of the gun trying to get the thing to fire. It blows my mind that a hunter of any sorts doesn't know how to fire a Glock. It's the most notorious, trusted handgun made today. Whether these faults were from inexperience or from the shock of the situation is beyond me. We just know it happened that way. Understandable even to those unable to relate. The absolute chaos of a situation like this cannot be comprehended by words. That I am sure of. So, the mistakes made there are ust the results of being in that situation.

The guide obviously upheld his obligation of protecting the client. Because he did not flee when the bear left him and turned on the client. He didn't run. He stayed the course because he had a job to do and was willing to do it. Whether he did that out of dedication to that creed or, the notion they were both together in the fight of their lives is unknown. What is known is he is dead because he DIDN'T run.

Obviously, the client did not run initially. He stood his ground trying to help. In doing so, rendering the firearm useless to the guide when he threw him a gun on an empty chamber, with no clip in it. I'd say his intent was pure. He willingly passed the gun on to the other man because he was unable to make it go bang.

At some point, the sow left the client and went back to the guide. Probable due to his moving around getting the empty gun. Which freed the client allowing him to flee. Which he did. He run off when the opportunity presented itself after tossing the gun to the guide.

The results were the guide died. The client lived with a very minor physical wound. To board an airplane and return home before he even knew if the guide was alive or dead with a 100% certainty.

These are the facts as presented by those in the situation and the investigation.

Now, here is what I think. The client run when he saw that he was likely going to get hurt defending the guide and client team they were by contract and obligation. When the rubber met the road, he picked the road. Leaving the guide to fend for the both of them. That may sound rough but, it is what happened. He chose to leave his guide to fight for them both, to protect his own hide.

I rationalize he must have felt remorse for doing so. Which is why he left the way he did, when he did. And, I imagine he has had a lot of people telling him he did the right thing. I just feel like he probably didn't believe that then and, will have to live with that decision forever. His actions doesn't make him an evil guy. Just a guy that nobody wants to be. And, a guy he was having a hard time being initially. How he feels now is beyond me. Or, how he will feel in the future.

I'm just glad that I wasn't there. No key board warrior here but, I'd stayed and likely died right there with him. Its just the way I'm built. And, I imagine many here are the same way. I could have never left that man to carry the load for both of us. Some people are like that and some aren't. I'm just that way.

Had I been the guide with 5 young kids and a wife I loved at home, it would have been best that I die right there after being left to do so by the client. I'm afraid of what I would have done had I not. I hate it for the guides family. I really do. I feel little remorse for the client. He picked self preservation over commitment to his fellow man and, that is what he got. Its his baby to live with. However he does so, I'm fine with it. Its just not a position I am able to relate too. I'll finish by saying while I personally know only a few here, if I end up in this situation with anyone, count me a statistic. We are going to live or die. but, whatever we do, we are going to do it together. Thats the bond we made when we went hunting together. And, one I'd uphold.
 
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Maybe the outfitter should have vetted their clients before hand?
Maybe the outfitter should have briefed/trained their clients before taking them into the Wilderness?
Isn't that EXACTLY why the state of Wyoming does not allow non-residents to hunt in the Wilderness without Outfitter representation?

I have no dog in the fight.
Sad situation.
But- jumping on the client for his actions/reactions seems to be silly. Obviously he wasn't prepared for this type of encounter- maybe not even been prepared for this hunt in general? But- the outfitter took his money, and put him in that exact spot- maybe they should hold some of the responsibility for the outcome?
I suspect that the reason WY Fish and Game doesn't allow non-residents to hunt wilderness without a guide is because they don't want to deal with grizzly bears being shot every time they get the least bit aggressive or threatening. It surely isn't because they are concerned about the welfare of the hunters. My opinion only...
 
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