Beginner just bought a RCBS Kit looking for guidance

NDGuy

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Picked up a RCBS Master Reloader Kit at Gander for $197 out the door + the $50 rebate from RCBS means I got it for $147, over half off!

I picked up my dies, calipers, shell holders and primers. Is there anything I am missing besides brass, powder and bullets?

If I am missing anything, which of it is a necessity vs makes life easier?

Thanks!
 

mechengr

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Best reloading accessory I've used is the Hornady comparator set. Allows you to easily measure to the ogive for more consistent seating depth measurements. I would call it a necessity, especially if loading hollow point/soft point bullets.

On the "makes life easier" side, I've been seriously contemplating upgrading my RCBS beam balance to something digital, for speed of readout. The beam scale has not failed me yet though and is certainly good to learn the reloading process on.
 

maninthemaze

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Check out Panhandle Precision on you tube. He has a bunch of instructional videos.

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Gorp2007

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First and foremost, get a bullet puller. Just trust me. This is a necessity.

After that, I'd recommend a powder trickler to fine-tune your loads if you want absolute precision. Depending on the powder type, the Uniflow can be +/- 0.2 grains in my experience. Your mileage may vary. Makes life easier.

I'd also recommend a dedicated decapping die so that you don't screw up your resizing dies and so that you can deprime before you clean. Makes life easier.

Finally, I'd get a second reloading manual so that you can compare recipes and fill in any gaps. Makes life easier.
 

16Bore

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You can trickle powder quicker and easier with a narrow shot glass. Reloading can be a never ending rabbit hole, you will spend a pretty good amount of dough and by default you'll shoot more. It can become a full time hobby in itself. I got into it pretty deep and was happy to jump the hell out of it too. It's rather time consuming and depends on what else you want to do with your time.

End result, either way, is that you'll have a much better understanding of ammunition and your rifles and you'll be a better shot.
 

GKPrice

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Best reloading accessory I've used is the Hornady comparator set. Allows you to easily measure to the ogive for more consistent seating depth measurements. I would call it a necessity, especially if loading hollow point/soft point bullets.

On the "makes life easier" side, I've been seriously contemplating upgrading my RCBS beam balance to something digital, for speed of readout. The beam scale has not failed me yet though and is certainly good to learn the reloading process on.

started using a REDDING BR measure a while back, it throws so close that with the beam scale and trickler hunting rounds move along at break neck speed - I have a Dillon 550 for 45 acp, a buddy swears by that progressive for all his rifle rounds ..... don't think I'll go quite that far but supposedly some of the top long range rifle shooters use one for all their practice ammo
RCBS is basically great equipment (from a GREAT company), bet most of us started out with at least some RCBS and many see no need to look farther
 

jorgensen.travis

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I use a lot of Lee products. I think they're great and the price is right. I own an RCBS measure and a cheap Lee measure. I usually use the Lee because it's easier to clean out when I'm done. I've never had an issue with inconvenience throws from either measure. Using a trickler means that you are measuring every charge. This kind of thing is for bench rest competitors or people who look at reloading as the hobby rather than shooting the ammo that you load. If you just want to load practical hunting ammo for cheap get a cheap digital scale to save some time and eventually a case trimmer.


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NDGuy

NDGuy

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Thanks for the responses. I did get a powder trickler and a brass holder yesterday also 40% off at Gander
 

GKPrice

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I use a lot of Lee products. I think they're great and the price is right. I own an RCBS measure and a cheap Lee measure. I usually use the Lee because it's easier to clean out when I'm done. I've never had an issue with inconvenience throws from either measure. Using a trickler means that you are measuring every charge. This kind of thing is for bench rest competitors or people who look at reloading as the hobby rather than shooting the ammo that you load. If you just want to load practical hunting ammo for cheap get a cheap digital scale to save some time and eventually a case trimmer.


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I'd think that giving a new handloader who wants to learn the practice advice like this does all of us a disservice - The fundamentals of any new "sport" are important but in particular in one that can hurt you if done improperly - That's my 0.02 worth on not following proper tutelage .... the likes of which will be found in any loading manual on today's bookshelves
 

N2TRKYS

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I wouldn't waste my money on a trickler or a beam scale. Do yourself a favor and get a Chargemaster or something similar. Get a reloading book, if you want to. Most companies have their load data online for free. Get the handheld priming tool that doesn't require you to change shellholders. Get the Hornady headspace comparator kit. Don't waste your money on measuring to the ogive. Use your cleaning rod to measure distance the the lands, don't buy the gauge and all the modified cases. Buy 2 die sets(full length and seating) is all you need.

This is some of the things I've learned for loading hunting loads.

Good luck.
 
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jorgensen.travis

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Yep, and I'm sure reckless companies like Remington, Winchester, Nosler, and every other ammo manufacture doesn't weigh every charge. Nor do most competive shooters, because they have to spend their time actually shooting their ammo.


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16Bore

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The whole point is the make ammo that trumps factory ammo. Throw and trickle up. It's not rocket science. Once you get more confident in the whole process you might just throw. Some guys like the warm and fuzzy of weighing each charge. You can throw a block full, the weight the first, last, and one on each row to see your consistency.

Buy a RCBS 10/10 scale and forget the electronic bullshit.


Point being, go slow...
 

16Bore

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It becomes an endless physics skullphuck in the end. Then it ends.
 
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NDGuy

NDGuy

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Thanks again guys. I will definitely be taking my time when I am first starting out. I want to learn and make sure it is correct, I am a man of process.
 

jorgensen.travis

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Good to here and good luck. Remember to set everything up in an area where you won't be frequently distracted by your family. Devote your full attention to it while you're reloading. Never stop in the middle of a process. Try to come up with a system that is as foolproof as possible. For instance, I'll put my cases that haven't been done yet in a bowl to my left, and the cases that are done with whatever process I'm doing in a bowl on the right side of he press. When I pick up a case from the left I'll never stop or answer the phone or loose train of thought until that case makes it to the right bowl. That way if I get interrupted, I'll know what's going on with the cases in the left bowl and the cases in the right bowl, and never have anything left to question.


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16Bore

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Good advice.....and get a grip on headspace and concentricity.
 

maninthemaze

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I have learned through the years that primers sometimes fail, if they are left in the open too long. As an example, once while at the bench, right after I primed all my cases, I had to leave the house. I left them in their reloading tray and simply put them in my cabinet where I keep my powder, dies, etc... I came back to them several days later and completed the charging and seating process. While shooting that ammo, I had 3 out of 50 that didn't fire. I'm assuming the primers absorbed moisture from the atmosphere and went bad.

Now if I have to stop like that, I'll stick them in a zyploc bag, with one of those white desiccant bags that come with electronics. This ensures everything stays dry.

And if you are loading for precision, long range stuff, weigh every charge. If your loading 223 rounds for your AR to go plinking, weighing every charge isn't necessary.

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