Beginner Reloading Kit

Northern-Nomad

Junior Member
Joined
May 16, 2022
Messages
17
This might be a long one, so bear with me a little bit if you will. I'm interested in getting into reloading because I've been cursed with the bug for odd cartridges and would like to develop different loads for different purposes in the same cartridge, or at least not pay $5/round for general purpose hunting loads. I've read quite a bit about reloading but certainly don't know that much and don't really have a mentor, so I think my best bet is to buy a kit to start with, learn the basics, and then upgrade parts and pieces from there. So my first question is if any of you would recommend any kits over others? I have been leaning towards the Hornady deluxe kit for a few reasons. First, my father and I own a healthy collection of firearms in various calibers, so the Hornady lock-n-load system seems like it would be very nice for changing between cartridges a lot. However, I'm not experienced enough to know if this system is actually any better than any other brand or if it is mostly just a gimmick to catch uninformed newbies like myself. So my next question is if this system is a worthwhile consideration? Second, many of the local stores in my area carry Hornady dies and such, so I think it might be easier to acquire parts for the Hornady system. I do know though that many presses can interchange die brands, so I again would like to know if this is a worthwhile consideration. Lastly, if everything I just typed up is complete nonsense, what would you all recommend to get started instead? Thanks in advance, I think I'm about to learn a lot in this thread.
 

CanyonHunter

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2021
Messages
34
I have the hornady lock n load setup and really like it. If you don’t mind paying for the extra bushings it works great. Super easy to switch between types of dies or cartridges. I’ve heard people say it’s not as precise, but I measure every finished round and they never vary.
 

XLR

Well Known Rokslider
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
May 24, 2018
Messages
416
Location
Grand Junction, CO
I have been using the Hornady die kit religiously for a couple of years now and nothing moves. I actually swapped the center screw on my RCBS Rockchucker to use the bushing so that is another option. I think that all of the starter kits out there work well and are about the same when it comes to the end result. The first upgrade I would make though is to go to an automatic powder thrower! I loaded 20 rounds on a beam scale and instantly bought a charge master!

As far as dies go you can use whichever brand you want as long as they have the standard threads! Don't get too caught up on the Hornady dies in a Hornady press. You will be better off going with some Redding Dies.
 

harvey_nw

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
527
Location
WA
Screwing in dies ain’t that big of a deal. I’d look past the Hornady kit and dies.
This ^^. The Hornady lock-n-load bushings are a marketing solution to a made up problem. If saving 3 seconds of unscrewing a die is worth $10/die to you then maybe you'll like it.

I don't have any personal experience with the Hornady kit, not saying it won't load the same ammo but I can say when I initially invested I compared it to the RCBS master reloader kit and went with it, and still use almost all the components. I recently invested in a chargemaster as advised above and will second that as well, makes the process almost twice as fast even double checking the charges on the beam. Whatever you do, BUY A HEADSPACE GAUGE KIT AND BULLET INSERTS and a good set of calipers, so you can accurately take the correct measurements of cases. Don't watch the RCBS or Hornady tutorial videos, watch the precision reloading series from Panhandle Precision on youtube and set your dies up correctly for minimal (.002") shoulder bump.

I would highly recommend doing some in depth research on recognizing pressure signs and safety of working up high pressure loads before you even think about wildcatting and fireforming. If you don't feel comfortable with something, ask. There's a wealth of experience and knowledge on this forum. Welcome to the rabbit hole.
 
OP
N

Northern-Nomad

Junior Member
Joined
May 16, 2022
Messages
17
I appreciate all the responses. I don't know if I'm willing to pay the extra bit just for lock-n-load mechanism, so I've started looking at other kits a bit more, specifically the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme kit. Does anyone have any experience with this one? Also, just based on the included parts list between the RCBS one and the Hornady Deluxe kit, the Hornady kit seems to include significantly more equipment, albeit for $100 more. Is there any benefit to looking into the Hornady one just for the extra equipment even if I don't get the extra bushings for each die to use the lock-n-load system?
 

long hunter

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 27, 2021
Messages
677
I am a R.C.B.S. Loader, And also a keep it as simple as possible type person. I suggest the R.C.B.S. Used them going on close to 50 years and no regrets.
 

harvey_nw

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 13, 2019
Messages
527
Location
WA
Looking at both (The Hornady Lock-N-Load Classic vs RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Kit) right now the most noticeable difference IMHO is the RCBS kit all you would need to buy additionally is a $10 powder trickler for convenience. The Hornady kit you would need to buy a beam scale, neck brushes, and it doesn't come with allen wrenches. Those cheap little digital scales will cause you nothing but issues, even the charges off my chargemaster get checked on the beam and trickled up to dead nuts when I'm doing development. Again, I can't say in regards to a comparison because I've never used the Hornady stuff, but I have no complaints about the RCBS kit.
 

Eight_Ring

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2022
Messages
11
I got started with the Rock Chucker Supreme kit. Midway just had it on sale for $275 last week--which is a pretty good deal, I'd say. Keep your eye peeled for deals.

I'd also recommend against an electronic scale. They are subject to electromagnetic drift. A beam scale is gravity-driven, and should prove more reliable generally. You can upgrade to powder trickler later, if you want to speed things up, and always have the beam scale to use as a failsafe/2nd point of reference.

I do like the ease/repeatability of the Hornady locking rings on my dies. Those are a nice upgrade. I put them on all my dies.


 

Eight_Ring

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2022
Messages
11
I got started with the Rock Chucker Supreme kit. Midway just had it on sale for $275 last week--which is a pretty good deal, I'd say. Keep your eye peeled for deals.

I'd also recommend against an electronic scale. They are subject to electromagnetic drift. A beam scale is gravity-driven, and should prove more reliable generally. You can upgrade to powder trickler later, if you want to speed things up, and always have the beam scale to use as a failsafe/2nd point of reference.

I do like the ease/repeatability of the Hornady locking rings on my dies. Those are a nice upgrade. I put them on all my dies.



EDIT: I was referring to an ELECTRONIC powder trickler, to speed things up.

Also--inre: case lube, I like Imperial sizing die wax for full length resizing. Smooth as silk, and I've never had a case get stuck.
 

49ereric

Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2022
Messages
82
This might be a long one, so bear with me a little bit if you will. I'm interested in getting into reloading because I've been cursed with the bug for odd cartridges and would like to develop different loads for different purposes in the same cartridge, or at least not pay $5/round for general purpose hunting loads. I've read quite a bit about reloading but certainly don't know that much and don't really have a mentor, so I think my best bet is to buy a kit to start with, learn the basics, and then upgrade parts and pieces from there. So my first question is if any of you would recommend any kits over others? I have been leaning towards the Hornady deluxe kit for a few reasons. First, my father and I own a healthy collection of firearms in various calibers, so the Hornady lock-n-load system seems like it would be very nice for changing between cartridges a lot. However, I'm not experienced enough to know if this system is actually any better than any other brand or if it is mostly just a gimmick to catch uninformed newbies like myself. So my next question is if this system is a worthwhile consideration? Second, many of the local stores in my area carry Hornady dies and such, so I think it might be easier to acquire parts for the Hornady system. I do know though that many presses can interchange die brands, so I again would like to know if this is a worthwhile consideration. Lastly, if everything I just typed up is complete nonsense, what would you all recommend to get started instead? Thanks in advance, I think I'm about to learn a lot in this thread.
How many rounds are you going to shoot per year?
lots then a progressive loader.
I just use a rock chucker but I don’t shoot thousands of round a year.
I worked with a guy that shot 6000/year .204 cal., at prairie dogs and he just had a rock chucker set up in his living room.
obviously a single guy 😂
 

Jimbee

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 16, 2020
Messages
145
I like my Lyman kit. It comes with a 8 hole turret and you can buy another. It came with an electronic dispener scale. I priced all the components separately and the kit is way cheaper. I have some expensive dies and some dies that were the cheapest I could find and I can't tell a difference in my group sizes.
 

long hunter

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 27, 2021
Messages
677
Check Midway they have a pretty good sale going on now with beginners R.C.B.S. loading set ups
 
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