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Beretta 686 Onyx

#1
Does anyone have one of these? it is the quail special, and I'm looking for opinions on this model, and how you are using it. I would be using it mostly for sporting clays and occasional bird hunts. Would this be well suited for sporting clays? Any problems I should be looking for with this model? It has 28" barrels, and multiple chokes. Dont be bashful, Give me the good, the bad and the ugly if there are any. I just don't want to drop a bunch of money on a shotgun that doesnt fit my purpose. Thanks
 

eamyrick

Well-known member
#2
I primarily upland bird hunt with a 20 gauge onyx pro (the 2017 model). It has nice wood and points great. If you buy a new gun you can get a pad to suit your length of pull without any fitting required. I like mine so much I bought my wife one. They can be found for just North of 2k. They older onyx's are also nice, especially in 20 though the wood is not as nice as the newer models. I have a 12 gauge sitting in the gun safe that doesn't get any use that I've had listed for sale for half a year with no movement. The 20s usually go fast.
 
#3
I primarily upland bird hunt with a 20 gauge onyx pro (the 2017 model). It has nice wood and points great. If you buy a new gun you can get a pad to suit your length of pull without any fitting required. I like mine so much I bought my wife one. They can be found for just North of 2k. They older onyx's are also nice, especially in 20 though the wood is not as nice as the newer models. I have a 12 gauge sitting in the gun safe that doesn't get any use that I've had listed for sale for half a year with no movement. The 20s usually go fast.
Thanks for that Rick, any other comments/opinions of the 686 quail special? Forgot to add that this is in 28 gauge.
 

eamyrick

Well-known member
#4
If my memory serves me the quail special had some gold quail on the sides which is cool if that’s your thing. There is no real advantage to a 28 gauge because they usually weigh the same as a 20 which can be shot with downloaded ammo or high brass depending on your goal. If it’s priced right I’d have a hard time passing it up.
 

Roy68

Well-known member
#5
I used to shoot sporting clays weekly for a several years. I Always wanted to have a higher grade nicer shotgun “to me”. In the end I never spent the money and kept using my old SKB 600 with 26” barrels and fixed chokes. Reason being is the shotgun just simply fits me very well and I never took myself that serious. I would often be on the same courses with a master class shooter that shot a broom handled 870. Point is; Absolutely buy what fits, buy what is in your budget, and shoot often.
 
#6
I currently own this gun in 20ga 28inch barrels. I have the pro field version with the upgraded wood. Absolutely love the gun, great weight for the length, the swing feels right, never any issues. I have owned multiple Beretta's (SP1, SP5, Urika) and as similar as the have been this is my favorite.
 
#7
Rick, you are correct, it has gold inlay which I'm not sure if I like or not. You bring up a good point on the ammo. 12 and 20 gauge ammo is pretty cheap for sporting, but I was looking at the 28 gauge, and it's over twice the price of what I pay for 20 and 12, something I had not considered. $1400 on the quail special sound about right? Thank you Roy68, and Ten Bears for your comments. Thats a very nice shotgun you have Ten Bears.
 

codym

Well-known member
#8
I’m not familiar with the quail special but I have had a bunch of onyx’s in different gauges, currently have a sp1 in 20 and an sp2 in 20 with some upgrades. So beretta offers two frames on there 28’s, basically a 20 ga frame and a true scaled 28 frame. Most bird hunters prefer the “baby” frame most competitive shooters will prefer the 20’ frame. In clays games most guns are long and heavier to premote follow through on the swing. 28’ barrels are fine but most serious shooters will have 30-32’ barrels. I shoot all my field guns for skeet 5 stand and SC’s but for me it’s just cross training for bird hunting. If I was doing it to be competitive I would have a purpose built gun. As for the 28 if it’s on the baby frame it should be a sweet little wand. I want one but have went down the custom rifle rabbit hole of late
 
#9
I've been doing a little research on the cost of ammo for 28 ga over 20 ga, and the cost savings in the course of a year, averaging 100 shots per week, I could buy me a pretty nice new shotgun every couple of years by sticking with a 20 gauge. The other option would be to reload for the 28. I'm not into competitive shooting SC's, I just shoot with some friends at a local club about twice a week and about 50 shots per visit. I may rethink the 28 ga.
 
#10
I have a 686 two barrel set with 20 and 28 ga barrels. I haven’t shot the 28 in yrs as it is heavier than the 20. I’d buy the gun in a 20 myself. And I do reload for both gauges. Components and cases for a 20 are much easier to locate. My 686 with the 20 ga barrels (28”) is one of my favorite shotguns...trim in hand, points well for me, lots of rounds and field time with it over 16 years. Good luck!
 

codym

Well-known member
#13
I'm setup to reload for the 20 but haven't the last couple years. I can't really justify it when there are so many good cheap loads. I usually shoot 7/8 oz 6's for upland birds. If I shoot clays I do the cheap walmart economy packs. I reload TSS for turkeys not for a cost savings, but for a performance gain. I think the cost savings would be realized much quicker reloading for the 28 ga.
 
#15
I like to reload light loads for skeet and sporting clays for the 20 gauge guns my wife and I own. We have a couple of 6# SxSs and the aforementioned Beretta 686. Factory 7/8 oz loads are quite a bit faster and hence recoil more than the reloads I prefer. For hunting we use normal factory field loads or the equivalent reloads.
 
#16
Blockcaver, have decided against the 28 gauge and looking at a few used 686's with 28" barrels, but there is a 686 SP1 with 30" barrels at a pretty good price, and I do like to shoot sporting clays. Would 30" barrels hurt it as an upland gun? Welcome comments from others also, Thanks.
 
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codym

Well-known member
#17
Not at all. A 30’ barreled o/u is about the same length as most 26’ semi autos. I like 30’ barrels they help smooth out my swing on long crossers and any little extra weight at the end of a shotgun is usually a good thing. The only time I could think that they maybe a issue is in really thick cover or something.
 
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