bigger guy sleeping suggestions

stinky

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Messages
25
Going to be backpacking in for the first time next year and I'm looking for some suggestions for sleeping gear, bag and pad/pads. I'm 6'3" and hopefully down to less than 220 by the time we go. I'm told we'll be tent camping at 10,000-11,000 feet in Colorado for the archery elk season a week before the muzzle loader season starts. I was looking at the Klymit Static V but I'm not sure that will be wide enough for me at 23". I quickly tried out a Therm-a-Rest NeoAir and that seemed to support me well enough, but was a bit bothered by the price. Throw some ideas at me.

Thanks
 

rye_a

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
276
Location
Colorado
You can usually get a long wide Exped Synmat UL7 on eBay for a pretty good price.
 

BuckSnort

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
1,034
Location
Central CA
You are going to get about 5 different suggestions for pads and at least 3 for a bag... I advise you to get them early enough so you can test them out in the woods before you're trip so you have enough time to tweak you're system to fit you're needs before the hunt..
 

drthornton

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
253
Location
Prosper, TX
Agreed with Bucksnort...I'm a big guy too and I just can't sleep comfortably in a mummy bag for multiple days. You need to figure out if you sleep hot or cold, restless sleeper? and side sleeper?

I like Big Agnes because of the wider shoulder girth and integrated pad sleeve. I am a hot/restless/side sleeper.

Tylenol PM helps as well for a better nights sleep:)
 

muleman

Senior Member
Joined
May 8, 2012
Messages
1,522
Location
Utah
I'm 6'2" and have been about your desired weight. I have been using a Big Agnes wide long Insulated Air Core (78" x 25" x 2.5", 36 oz, 4.1 R-Value, 15 F) for several years. I am considering getting a Exped DownMat UL 7 LW (77.5" x 26" x 2.8", 26.5 oz, 5.9 R-Value, -11 F) for additional weight savings and insulating ability this year. I personally prefer the air tube to run parallel like the DownMat and IAC vs perpendicular like the NeoAir.

As for bags my best advice is to try them on before you buy. Some run really tight like the GoLite mummys. You can't go wrong with the big names and it really will come down to personal preference as to which bag fits you the best.
 

sreekers

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
1,254
Location
Wyoming
So, I am 6'5" and 210lbs. Have to work pretty hard to stay at that weight as well, but that is a different post. I use a Thermarest NeoAir and really like it. Mine is obviously the long version and it sleeps pretty well. Some don't like that it is a little noisy, doesn't bother me much. So for what its worth, I like it.

I have been using tall down mummy bag for years and it has served me well. By next season I hope to try a Kifaru bag, but we will see what I am using. My new warm weather set up is just a woobie, but have to find bivy to use.
 

broncoformudv

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
186
Location
Anchorage, Alaska
The most comfortable pad I have used so far has been the Big Agnes Insulated Air Core. Great pad and pretty light and works for all 4 seasons due to the insulation.

For bags I used a Montbell U.L. Super Spiral Down Hugger, they are not cheap but they are very comfortable, warm , and light! They have a stretch to them so they are not constricting but collapse enough to get ride of all that extra air space you normally waste energy heating up.
 

Dave Rahm

Newbie
Joined
Jun 15, 2012
Messages
5
Whatever you choose, try and test it first. If you can't test it, take good care of it in case you need to return it.

Also, you don't have to buy a super warm bag. Just add a layer of clothing to sleep in and you should be fine.

Good luck.
 

broncoformudv

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
186
Location
Anchorage, Alaska
Whatever you choose, try and test it first. If you can't test it, take good care of it in case you need to return it.

Also, you don't have to buy a super warm bag. Just add a layer of clothing to sleep in and you should be fine.

Good luck.
Who wants to live 24/7 in all their gear? Personally I can not control the temps outside and I don't want to wear all of my gear to bed either so I like a bag that is rated for a colder temp then I plan on using it in. It is easy enough to unzip it some to cool off if I get too hot. That extra r-factor is not all that much weight.
 

Ryan Avery

Admin
Staff member
Joined
Jan 5, 2012
Messages
6,141
It's really a guessing game the first time out. Some people can't stand to sleep in there clothing. It doesn't bother me. I would look at the big Agnes for a cheaper pad. As far as bags go, do a search there is tons of info on them. But one thing is for sure. After your first DIY backpacking trip. You will have a better understanding of what your needs are!
 

a3dhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
859
Location
Colorado Springs,CO
Agreed with Bucksnort...I'm a big guy too and I just can't sleep comfortably in a mummy bag for multiple days. You need to figure out if you sleep hot or cold, restless sleeper? and side sleeper?

I like Big Agnes because of the wider shoulder girth and integrated pad sleeve. I am a hot/restless/side sleeper.
Same here.
Big Agnes Encampment 15 degree bag and insulated air core pad gets me a good nights sleep.
I'm a hot/side sleeper....but sleep like a rock. When my head hits the pillow (rolled up clothing), my eyes are shut and the snoring begins (much to the haste of my hunting/camping partners), but I can tell how well I slept the next morning. I can't do with a thin air pad, the thick Insulated Air Core is comfy.
6'1" 270 lbs.
 

JG358

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
1,081
Location
Colorado
I'm a hot/side sleeper....but sleep like a rock. When my head hits the pillow (rolled up clothing), my eyes are shut and the snoring begins (much to the haste of my hunting/camping partners), but I can tell how well I slept the next morning.
That ain't no joke either! Dudes louder than a straight piped diesel with the throttle wide open. One of these years I'll remember ear plugs. :)
 

HockeyDad

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2012
Messages
101
Location
Littleton, CO
I'm 6' 235# and use either a Western Mountaineering Badger down bag or a Big Agnes Encampment bag with a neo air pad. Im a side sleeper and really toss and turn, so I do the tylenol PM trick and it helps a bit. This year I am going to pack in a ZLite short pad as well and see if that helps add a little cushion (and a backup in case the blowup pad springs a leak)
 

Rizzy

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
1,391
Location
Idaho
A foam pad and short thermarest could be an option if you want a lower price point
 

a3dhunter

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
859
Location
Colorado Springs,CO
That ain't no joke either! Dudes louder than a straight piped diesel with the throttle wide open. One of these years I'll remember ear plugs. :)
That's what you get when you're the last one to sleep...
You would be better off with an ipod, I hear ear plugs aren't enough around me. ;)

You shouldn't tire a fat boy out so much...

I will add with the Big Agnes insulated air core I find I can let a little air out for a "softer" feel and still not be hitting the ground at night.
 

2rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,030
Location
Nor Cal
Big Agnes and Western mountaineering are both roomy bags. I haven't bought an air core yet. Take the wife/girlfriend or some chick on a second date to test out the various options at a REI or local backpacking/mountaineering store. It is always entertaining at least.
 

Aron Snyder

2
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Jan 23, 2012
Messages
5,011
Location
The Wilderness
Who wants to live 24/7 in all their gear? Personally I can not control the temps outside and I don't want to wear all of my gear to bed either so I like a bag that is rated for a colder temp then I plan on using it in. It is easy enough to unzip it some to cool off if I get too hot. That extra r-factor is not all that much weight.
I DO!

Sleeping with all your clothing on may not be something you would choose to do, but I would not knock it!

Each to his own, but saving space and weight on extended trips can be tough and this is very easy to do.

When the temps drop, just add a layer....you're packing it anyway.

What bag are you using?
 
Top