Bow/equipment failure in backcountry

ozyclint

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
1,159
Location
Queensland, Downunder
Yes it's an A&H ACS longbow.
how it happened? Mate and I just got back to camp after he had a stalk on a bull tahr. He didn't get a shot at it. Thought we'd have a few practice shots at camp. His first shot, boom, limb failure. that could well have happened on that tahr if he had have been able to get a shot at it.
He'd had trouble with a previous set of limbs going way out of tiller.

He then changed to Dryad with ACS limbs. limb exploded on that too within a week.
He abandoned anything ACS after that. he now has a few Bear takedowns.
 

drmatara

Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
71
Best solution is to have a backup bow ready to go. Too many things to prepare for. I don't think it's worth hauling a bow into the backcountry, just need to have it accessible within a day or two.
 

drmatara

Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
71
Best solution is to have a backup bow ready to go. Too many things to prepare for. I don't think it's worth hauling a bow into the backcountry, just need to have it accessible within a day or two.
 

Marble

Senior Member
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
1,475
I take an extra string, cable set up.
Peep
Speed nocks if needed
Rest
Sight

I leave them at the truck, but if I need them, I've got them.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

andegreg

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
13
Location
Idaho
Never really worried about issues with my bow. Keep some small parts and tools in the truck if I really need them.
 

Wheels

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2016
Messages
347
Location
Missouri
I always carry a spare release in my pack, not sure how many I’ve left out on the mountain... take them off to put clothes on or off and hear a bugle and take off leaving the release laying where I was. Also fell on my bow back in the days of aluminum arrows and broke every arrow in the quiver. Always keep a supply in the truck.
 

Dwinsall

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2017
Messages
11
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Anyone else worry about your bow or other equipment failing in the backcountry? It’s always in the back of my mind while I’m hunting and it’s something that I’d like to be prepared for if it ever happens. I’d also like to know that I’m prepared for anything that could happen so that I could have some peace of mind.

So, has anyone had any bow/equipment failures while they were hunting in the backcountry? What do you do to mitigate issues and prepare for failures?

I should also add that we always take horses into the backcountry (around 10 miles in) where we set up base camp and hunt from there so keeping an extra bow in the truck doesn’t do me much gooyd

Anyone else worry about your bow or other equipment failing in the backcountry? It’s always in the back of my mind while I’m hunting and it’s something that I’d like to be prepared for if it ever happens. I’d also like to know that I’m prepared for anything that could happen so that I could have some peace of mind.

So, has anyone had any bow/equipment failures while they were hunting in the backcountry? What do you do to mitigate issues and prepare for failures?

I should also add that we always take horses into the backcountry (around 10 miles in) where we set up base camp and hunt from there so keeping an extra bow in the truck doesn’t do me much good.
The simple way to get over this concern is to always have a backup bow ready to go back at your vehicle. It seems like if you have a backup already go nothing will happen. If you don't crap will happen. And it eliminates the fear all together...
 

WakePraySlay

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2020
Messages
119
Location
Eastern Washington
Backcountry hunts where I’ll be 4-7 days out I’ll bring my cable press, 3 ft of serving, d loop material, extra peep, lighter, basic Allen keys, original chapstick (use for string or the lips 2 for 1) and a backup release, same model I shoot with, also it’s a good idea to practice with your backup release if you carry one!
 
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