Bubble, Target, Pins!

Curtis C

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Joined
Mar 1, 2012
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789
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
I have really been trying to keep an eye on my bubble so that I get a nice level shot.
In order to maintain a timely shot(for hunting) I have been setting bubble level, focus on target, pin on my spot, release! I would like to double check bubble before release but find I lose focus on my target and the pin moves from my spot when I do.

Should I be doing things differently?

Whats your process?

C
 

weaver

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Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
1,158
I get on target first then check bubble. Pick a spot and shoot.
 

Ozz08

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Feb 24, 2012
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420
Location
Castle Rock, CO
After you get enough reps in anchoring the same and setting your bubble you will get to a point where you hardly need the bubble for reference. After enough drawing, anchoring, and shooting the same way over and over again my sight bubble comes up level every time now I just take a quick glance like a second nature type of thing and pick a spot and release.
 

Darin Cooper

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Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
879
Location
Idaho
I have really been trying to keep an eye on my bubble so that I get a nice level shot.
In order to maintain a timely shot(for hunting) I have been setting bubble level, focus on target, pin on my spot, release! I would like to double check bubble before release but find I lose focus on my target and the pin moves from my spot when I do.

Should I be doing things differently?

Whats your process?

C
Sounds like you've got it right Curtis - that's basically what I do as well. One thing that will really help keep the bow level while you execute a shot is to get it balanced left-to-right. I always use a side stabilizer or offset bracket for my stabilizer to help balance out the quiver, sight, and sight window. Keeping level is pretty easy on flat ground - on a sidehill is where it can be a challenge for any shooter. One more tip for you...

If you are shooting on a side-hill, tip the top limb to the uphill side when you draw, then relax the bubble into level. The natural tendency is to draw your bow perpendicular to the ground which means your top limb will be tipped to the downhill side. It's much more difficult to get level from the downhill side without causing torque. This will help you get onto aiming and shooting quicker and with a more relaxed grip.

Good Luck!

Coop
 

swat8888

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
457
Location
Alaska
A good drill I learned to create muscle memory was to draw back, close your eyes and think about your anchor, grip, etc. and keep your eyes closed until you feel comfortable. Now I draw back looking at the target first focusing on holding hard against the wall and my bubble is usually right on...just need to adjust the sight pin, settle in and take the shot...worked for me anyhow. I've killed nothing with my bow except targets, time and money...so take it for what its worth.

That's good advice from Cooper, I need to practice like that...been taking up and downhill shots but from relatively flat ground...looks like I know what I'll be doing tomorrow.
 

Jared Bloomgren

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Feb 25, 2012
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788
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Rapid City, SD
There really isn't a right or wrong way to do it as long as you are consistent and on target. I too am much like Curtis and Darin. Right after reaching full draw my bubble becomes level and I focus on my target and settle my pin. I find this to work great for me!
 

Daniel Bybee

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Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
193
Location
Arizona
I know its a little over kill but I actually put a second level on my sight, Im shooting and older sure loc and I put a second level where the light goes. I usually try to get on target look and the level(s) than pick a spot and let fly.
 
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Curtis C

Curtis C

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Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
789
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
Thanks for the input folks. This just started because I bought a sight that has 2nd and 3rd axis adjustments so I want to use it to its fullest. I felt like I lost my focus on the target when I double checked my bubble(its been good on the double checks) and it took a second to regain target focus. Todays shooting I realized I had to look down to see the bubble through the peep. I put in a larger peep, now my bubble is a tad more visible through the peep. Only had time for a few shots before dark but I think that will help keep focus downrange.


C
 

RosinBag

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Feb 27, 2012
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Roseville, CA.
I shoot mine just like Darin does. I also just learned the sidehill technique he talked about this year while at Redding. It is certainly easier to relax the sight to level verse fighting it into level. Curtis, two schools of thought: very small peep and center the pin your using in center or larger peep and encircle the sight housing. I prefer encircling the sight housing as my bubble sits inside the sight housing, it is easier to gap the in between yardages and it affords you a larger field of view if the animal is moving. If your sight doesn't have the bubble inside the sight housing, I would consider changing sights. Having everything inside your field of view while at your anchor point will tend to lead to more consistent shots.
 
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Curtis C

Curtis C

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Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
789
Location
Colorado Springs, CO
I prefer encircling the sight housing as my bubble sits inside the sight housing.
Thats the method I use, so I am doing the same with the new setup. When I put this Spot Hogg Hunter with/small guard on I also switched to a smaller peep. Today I put the larger peep back in and I can see the sight housing much better.

C
 

RosinBag

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Roseville, CA.
The Hunter version will generally need at least a 3/16" or 1/4" peep to get the sight housing encircled if you run todays shorter ATA bows. Sounds like you are on the right track CC
 
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