Camera suggestions

coOverwatch

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Elizabeth, CO
Hi all.

Looking to replace my old point and shot camera and was looking at the Sony NEX 6.
Looking for something to take when I ma out scouting and to for the wife to take pics of the kids riding in the local rodeo’s.

Would like to be able to digiscope with it as well. I know the NEX 6 might be a little big for that. I also looked at the “what camera to get” thread.
Not sure if I want to go the DSLR route, plus the sales guy said it would be overkill and tht the NEX 6 would have the same quality of photo’s and vid.

Thoughts?
 

Matt Cashell

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Aron is running the Sony RX100, and really likes it. Should be a good digiscoping camera, if you can get it adapted.

I still really like the Nikon J1, and it has proved to be a capable digiscoping camera with my customized 10-30 lensm, and a solid step up from most compacts (other than the RX100, which has the same size sensor as the J1).

The NEX is an excellent camera, and outperforms the Nikon 1 generally, but is not as suitable for digiscoping.

There are tons of cheap compacts that have decent performance, and work well for digiscoping.

Here is my digiscoping article/video:

http://www.rokslide.com/2012-01-09-05-09-42/optics/216-hunting-for-photos
 

JGO

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One to consider which receives little hype is the Canon S95. Very versatile camera in a small package. The 2013 version is the S110.
 

Gman

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Colorado baby!
Well I'm no camera expert but somehow I've become quite the camera consumer. So I think my perspective has merit from a layman's point of view. I have the Sony Nex5n and it is a fantastic camera. BB is right, it's tough to use as a top digiscoping camera but it will take great photos through your scope with vignetting and then you can either keep the ring (which I think looks cool sometimes) or edit it out on your computer.

I recently switched up to the RX100 as an experiment. My reasoning? I really had to take a hard look at how I wanted to use a camera vs how I actually use a camera. I had all these visions of swapping out lenses, changing camera settings, etc. So I got the full NEX5n camera kit and it turns out - I never changed the stock lens and I'm a point and shoot guy. I also find out beyond hunting activities, even though it's small, I would still leave the NEX5 at home since I still had to carry a small camera bag with lenses and such. The RX100 fits in my pocket and I find it making it out with me and thus I'm getting photos I otherwise would have missed with the NEX.

So, the RX100 is rated top in it's class as a point and shoot. It does have all the settings to tweak image quality and it will take high quality photos. Plus it's small! I also just added an eye-fi wireless card so I can wirelessly transfer to my computer (which works real well) and to my iPhone for uploading pics (which I haven't had a chance to really try yet -- next weekend).

I guess the point of this post is try to be honest about what type of photographer you are. If I had asked myself I probably knew I wasn't going to get all technical and could have saved myself a bunch of money.

The RX100 is a bit minty in the price tag so if that's out of your budget I would recommend any of the Sony or Cannon point and shoots. I've also heard really good things about Lumix cameras for the price but I don't have any experience there.

The NEX series are awesome cameras -- especially if you're into photography and are considering a DSLR. I packed it everywhere last year with extra lenses and battery and for what you get it's almost the perfect high quality DSLR-type camera for backpack hunting in my opinion.

I hope that helps. I know that researching cameras gets confusing and is like all other hunting gear. Everyone has one they like best!
 
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coOverwatch

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Thanks Gman and Bitterroot.
This is what I am struggling with. I have shot a traditional (film) camera in a past life and I am looking at getting back into photography. Now that the kids are getting older and can hold their own on an afternoon hike and a wife that wants to get into the backcountry too, I want to be able to take great pics. I am also trying to get out into the backcountry more and have taken some good shots, but think I can get better quality with new technology. I realize that just getting a new camera is not going to be the magic ticket for great photo’s but having the right equipment sure is going to make things easier.

With that said I have to balance reality. Am I going to really fuss with changing setting, lenses etcetera to get that shot of a critter or view from atop a Colorado 14ner. I know I am the only one that is going to be able to answer that question.

At last count (9:30 mountain time) I have pulled out 10 camera’s that we have around the house with varying excuses as to why they do not meet the wife’s needs, or mine for that matter. I figured I would get others opinions on here as I have seen outstanding images and wanted to know what equipment everyone uses, even if it isn’t for digiscoping.
 

maverick

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I have a few cameras around the house too. Including a DSLR, RX100 and a couple point and shoots. For an all around camera I think one of the bridge cameras such as the Canon SX50 would be hard to beat. It has a 24 to 1200mm lens. There is no changing lenses and it can be used on full auto. The pics I've seen from it look pretty good even into the digital which will go to 4800mm. Here is a link to check out.

http://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=440965&highlight=sx50
 

Trout bum

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I have been real happy with my Pentax Optio. I take a lot of underwater fish pictures as well as mountain scenery shots. Small, durable and affordable. $200 at B&H photo online (great site for cameras, etc.). I do not digiscope so I am not sure if it is compatible. Tough little camera.
 

CrzyTrekker

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San Luis Valley, Colorado
I love my NEX-6 with the 16-50 kit kens. The 16-50 zoom is very small and lightweight. Easy to carry all day. The addition of a viewfinder makes photo composition easier in daylight and is a huge asset, IMO. I will not buy another camera without a viewfinder.

I do not digiscope and have no interest so that's not a concern for me.

I used a film camera in high school photography class years ago and am slowly finding that the NEX is a lot of fun and great for indoor and low light photography as well as adventure and landscape photography.
 

aron

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I have the Olympus Pen E-PL3 and have been very happy with it. Sorta the in between of a point and shoot and the DSLR. One of the more compact interchangable lens cameras and weighs 15.4oz with the 14-42mm lens.

I also haven't used it for digiscoping.
 

Matt Cashell

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I wanted to talk a little bit about camera "zoom", on this thread, since super-zooms like the Canon SX50 are being discussed.

Lens zoom is not magnification, so the Canon at 50x does not magnify the image 50x, like looking through a spotting scope at 50x.

The zoom refers to how wide the range of focal lengths go. the SX50 has 35mm equivalent focal lengths of 24-1200mm. So 1200 is 50 times 24. To get the equivalent magnification, you simply divide the max focal length by the non-magnified focal length which is 50mm (35mm equivalent). So the max optical magnification of the SX50 is actually 1200/50 = 24x. Which is still really impressive.

the digital zoom helps frame your video, but doesn't do much for stills, as you can just crop your max optical zoom shots for the same effect.
 

fillthefreezer

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I wanted to talk a little bit about camera "zoom", on this thread, since super-zooms like the Canon SX50 are being discussed.

Lens zoom is not magnification, so the Canon at 50x does not magnify the image 50x, like looking through a spotting scope at 50x.

The zoom refers to how wide the range of focal lengths go. the SX50 has 35mm equivalent focal lengths of 24-1200mm. So 1200 is 50 times 24. To get the equivalent magnification, you simply divide the max focal length by the non-magnified focal length which is 50mm (35mm equivalent). So the max optical magnification of the SX50 is actually 1200/50 = 24x. Which is still really impressive.

the digital zoom helps frame your video, but doesn't do much for stills, as you can just crop your max optical zoom shots for the same effect.

thanks matt
 
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coOverwatch

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thanks Matt

i have it down to the Cannon SX50 and the Sony NEX 6, and leaning towards the Sonly. I have a few Point and Shoot units that i can use for Digiscoping once i upgrade the spotter. have a busnell now and looking at a Vortex.

I have seen some great Video's and still from the NEX and if i can get the same results it will fit my needs.
 

Matt Cashell

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thanks Matt

i have it down to the Cannon SX50 and the Sony NEX 6, and leaning towards the Sonly. I have a few Point and Shoot units that i can use for Digiscoping once i upgrade the spotter. have a busnell now and looking at a Vortex.

I have seen some great Video's and still from the NEX and if i can get the same results it will fit my needs.

The Sony's sensor is a significant upgrade over the Canon. The NEX will do Hollywood quality video.

That said, the Canon is extremely versatile, and the pics and vids quality is pretty impressive, IMO.
 
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