Cardio interval times

MuleyFever

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Is there any difference doing cardio for say 30 min straight or doing three 10 min sessions?

I find myself really getting bored after a bit and I wonder if I would be loosing anything breaking it up. Maybe do a 10 or 15 minute session then stop and do something like core exercises then finish with more cardio?

I wonder if I may even get more out of it this way. My input level decreases towards the end of 30 min. I think I could keep my average intensity level up by breaking it up.
 

P Carter

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Different durations and different paces work different energy systems. Doing long sessions at low intensity works the "aerobic system" (called different things, but basically endurance training that adapts muscles to use fat for fuel and increase output for long durations at low intensities), while doing shorter sessions at high intensity can work on a number of systems/trigger a number of adaptations. For example, intervals at lactate threshold increase the body's ability to clear lactate; intervals at very high intensity can improve VO2 Max.

But you typically don't see interval sessions broken up with core exercises; typically there would be a work interval, then a recovery interval, then a work interval. The point is to hit particular thresholds, not to "break up" a workout for the sake of boredom.

I would suggest that you think about what gains/adaptations you are trying to accomplish, and then tailor a workout to that.

Sidenote: If "not getting bored" is the goal of a workout, then I suppose anything will do. My comment presupposes that you have goals and are training, not just exercising for kicks.
 
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MuleyFever

MuleyFever

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Different durations and different paces work different energy systems. Doing long sessions at low intensity works the "aerobic system" (called different things, but basically endurance training that adapts muscles to use fat for fuel and increase output for long durations at low intensities), while doing shorter sessions at high intensity can work on a number of systems/trigger a number of adaptations. For example, intervals at lactate threshold increase the body's ability to clear lactate; intervals at very high intensity can improve VO2 Max.

But you typically don't see interval sessions broken up with core exercises; typically there would be a work interval, then a recovery interval, then a work interval. The point is to hit particular thresholds, not to "break up" a workout for the sake of boredom.

I would suggest that you think about what gains/adaptations you are trying to accomplish, and then tailor a workout to that.

Sidenote: If "not getting bored" is the goal of a workout, then I suppose anything will do. My comment presupposes that you have goals and are training, not just exercising for kicks.
Thanks. I wouldnt say I am training. I can not exercise or I can exercise. I feel I should stay in the exercise group. I want to keep an acceptable (measured personally by my ability) level of fitness.
 

*zap*

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If you want to build aerobic capacity then ideally you need frequent, long duration sessions at a steady pace.
 

P Carter

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Thanks. I wouldnt say I am training. I can not exercise or I can exercise. I feel I should stay in the exercise group. I want to keep an acceptable (measured personally by my ability) level of fitness.
No problem there. I suppose the answer to your question, then, is “yes.” There is a difference between the two. If your goal is to exercise, then I suppose the option to choose would be the one that you will do more consistently. Honestly, I you are doing, say, a total of 30 minutes of “cardio” a few times a week there’s probably not a material difference between the two options.
 
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MuleyFever

MuleyFever

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I’m also on the wait list for a Concept row machine. Not sure if anyone thinks there is an ideal routine with a rower.
 

amassi

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I’m also on the wait list for a Concept row machine. Not sure if anyone thinks there is an ideal routine with a rower.
I just finished one called engine builder- row edition found online for like $9.
It's a 16 week program
Improved my time on 500,5k, 10k.
Also so much more comfortable on the rower in general and in transitions from the rower to other mvmnt. It was a sufficient mix for me- workouts are from 20-40 minutes and a mix of intervals, emoms, et el. Teaches pacing across watts, s/m, 500 pace etc.

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Ridge Runner

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I prefer doing some sort of interval as part of my cardio routine because it helps break up the session and it seems to suck less. On the rowing machine I do a 30 minute session. 1000 meter warm up then as hard as I can go 250 meters on followed by 250 meters at a recovery rate. I typically do this for 8 rounds then finish out the session at a pace to keep me at or above 80% of maximum heart rate. I wear a heart rate monitor on all my cardio work outs to keep myself from cheating and to gauge progress. Also keep track of total meters rowed in 30 minutes track improvement over time.

Don't know if this is the best approach to cardio fitness but it keeps me motivated and coming back. Do similar type approach on the stairmaster but do skip steps instead of faster. Only doing each piece of equipment 1-2 times per week alternated with spin class 2 days a week.
 

*zap*

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So, it seems to me that if we are doing this training for hunting/hiking then we would ideally be training to maximize our lower intensity heart rate atp production system which would raise our aerobic threshold heart rate and allow us to have more hours of energy at lower heart rates without debilitation. It is my understanding that your aerobic fueling system is best expanded with lower intensity longer duration and frequent aerobic capacity training sessions..at a certain point you mix in higher intensity training but that higher intensity training is still a smaller portion of the total volume of work. Similar to how an endurance athlete would train and I believe that hunting is more of an endurance activity, especially pack in/camp style hunts.

My personal experience is that improving 'low gear' has been the best thing I have done and I believe it should be the base of any training program. Daily, longer duration activity @ lower heart rates....active recovery zone-zone1-zone2, with adequate time spent in each zone on different days. I just go @ the pace that feels right for the day but I still push and almost every day has a suck factor except active recovery days. And believe me that if you are doing an hour or more every day and pushing @ some point things are going to start to suck. Add in muscular endurance by incline/weight while walking and resistance on bike @ the gym. Or walk stairs with/without weight.......but keep the heart rate in the lower zones and the durations longer.
 
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P Carter

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^ double agreed.

I would just note that the "suck factor" doesn't necessarily have to be a component of the base training. I used to ascribe to that; no pain, no gain, right? Now, I don't think that's true. For example, at this point I'm doing 8-9 mile runs at aerobic pace 3x per week, on hills whenever possible. Sometimes that results in a bit of bonking/suckage; sometimes it's completely pleasant. Either way, I think it's effective to build a base.

In the spring, I'll add high-intensity intervals, like 10x400 meters. Those have a high suck factor, but if you're in good enough aerobic shape the suck doesn't last long. In the summer, I'll do weighted uphill hikes at lactate threshold, which also have a suck factor but are actually really fun.

I'm lifting twice a week. Also a suck factor.

But after you get used to the longer aerobic sessions, IMO they don't have to have a suck factor to be effective.
 
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MuleyFever

MuleyFever

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I have been in that no pain no gain mindset too. I think I need to reduce my suck factor engagement. If I can get into a zone just below the suck factor I actually feel good and don’t mind the monotony as much. I can get my breathing in a good rhythm and keep my heart rate up. Sounds like that is where I need to be.
 

P Carter

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My first few years boxing, I would go and run 2 miles all out, thinking that this would replicate the completely gassed, woozy-legged feeling of being in the ring. I thought that 1) runners were crazy, and 2) there was no way I could run more than 2ish miles.

My fitness (in terms of recovery time, lower heart rate, \ability to remain focused/"with it" despite breathing really hard, "presence" in the ring, etc.) increased noticably when I slowed down, ran 5 miles at a relaxed pace 4 or so times a week, and coupled that with the standard HIIT-type, boxing-specific training. Of course, it's hard to disentangle variables; at that point I had a few years under my belt, an overall larger volume of HIIT-type training, more skills, etc. But it certainly seemed to help and now those long lower-effort runs are a key component of what I do. YMMV.
 

ScottRK

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Muley - I’m no expert just another guy that doesn’t like long slow training on my basement rower. More intervals for me. Here’s a link I found last year when starting again ://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-the-most-effective-10-minute-cardio-workout. And 1 this morning https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-010-1474-y.- 10 or 30’sec
Intervals.
It’s an Olympic sport you could go down a giant rabbit hole on the research of rower training.
 

Los4212

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Just my $.02, I worked for a while as a certified strength and conditioning coach and personal trainer, and interned at a D1 school as a strength and conditioning coach and was NSCA certified (The only recognized cert that the NCAA recognizes to allow you to train collegiate athletes) some of the most common ratios to use for HIIT (High intensity interval training) are 1:3-3:5 IE 10 seconds of all out work/sprint followed by 30 seconds jogging/walking ect. You can curtail these to your level of fitness, expertise, equipment available. These are incredibly time effective methods to get yourself into shape or build resistance. If you're looking to shake things up, buy a "battle rope" most people never do upper body related cardio and it can be a brutally effective way to spice up your cardio. A 20-50lb kettle bell is also a great addition to spice it up. There are a million ways to go at it
 

shoeshineman

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My .02 here as well. My experience from being an average bicycle road racer (USAC cat 3) for 10 years. I was also a research subject at the TCU physiology lab. Im not an expert just my opinion/experience.

Periodization. When out of season, focus on long slow miles/time to build your aerobic base (you are training to train in this period). 7 weeks before event, start doing HIT. HIT should HURT. You should feel like your body is filled with battery acid. Thats how you know it’s working. BATTERY ACID. These HIT workouts on pelaton or whatever are not what I consider HIT training. 1 week before event, do nothing at all or very slow short walks. This is recovery time.


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MuleyFever

MuleyFever

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My .02 here as well. My experience from being an average bicycle road racer (USAC cat 3) for 10 years. I was also a research subject at the TCU physiology lab. Im not an expert just my opinion/experience.

Periodization. When out of season, focus on long slow miles/time to build your aerobic base (you are training to train in this period). 7 weeks before event, start doing HIT. HIT should HURT. You should feel like your body is filled with battery acid. Thats how you know it’s working. BATTERY ACID. These HIT workouts on pelaton or whatever are not what I consider HIT training. 1 week before event, do nothing at all or very slow short walks. This is recovery time.


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What do you consider HIT training?
 

*zap*

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I just went thru a fairly long base period of low intensity, longer duration and eventually daily aerobic capacity training. I had to start going easier than that last March (third week of March), gradually increasing as time went on but was always right around my limit for work/recovery to be good......Taking a 10 day break from that right now but will keep strength every other day, 2x a week tennis and every 4th day a road ruck (evening workouts) going as usual. Plan to go back with a 1/2 hour higher intensity workout followed by a 2 hour low intensity workout the next day and then an off day.....repeat. That's the morning workout, then evenings is the above mentioned strength/tennis/rucking.

I will see how that goes and alter if needed.

You need a plan, commitment, discipline and judgement.......commitment gets you to do it, discipline gets you to stick to the plan and not exceed it and judgement is for being smart enough to know when it is time to back off a bit of skip a few......or push on harder than you planed.

64 and going strong.
 

shoeshineman

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What do you consider HIT training?
For me personally, I think of HIT as a synonym for "lactate threshold/recovery training." My goals are to (1) increase VO2 max and (2) train my cardio/pulm system to be highly efficient at removing lactate from my blood.

This VO2 max & lactate recovery, for me, translate directly to hunting high altitude day-after-day. I can feel relatively fresh on day 3/4/5 of a hunt AND I can recover quickly after bursts going up and down inclines at altitude.

At TCU, they used a mask to measure my gas output and they took blood samples at several minute intervals while doing anaerobic threshold efforts on the stationary bike. They gave me all the data from my VO2 and blood lactate. I'm a believer in it.

**edit** my HIT would look like this:
1. warm up with a light aerobic spin on the bike (maybe 20 minutes or so)
2. 30 seconds spinning as fast as possible with an extremely high resistance on the bike (this is 100% anaerobic. I want to fill my muscles and blood with lactic acid. This is the battery acid burn. This is so hard you can barely breath. There is no way you can be talking to someone during this part, because you can barely breathe. This hurts.)
3. 1 min spinning with almost no resistance on bike (this is when you are dissipating the lactate from your blood thru your lungs)
4. repeat step 2&3 back-to-back about 5 or 6 times

 
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