Carter Honey 2 release

mfllood3800

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So I decided to try a back tension, to clean up some form issues
I don't believe I have target panic too bad, though I believe it is there in a mild way.

So my questions on this release are:

1. Is it normal to have the D loop twist at anchor and the release positioned to where the back of my hand is on my jaw?

2. I have been at full draw with my thumb off the safety( that's how this is set) to go off and it never released.
- I tried twisting my hand, pulling with my back muscles and even rotating as with a hinge and I finally had to regrab the thumb and let down. This happened twice.
- I was able to get a clean release on out of 3 times.
- I called the store I purchased this from and the guy just said you have to get used to it.
- But I don't think I should have to hold and hold and hold??

3. Anyone using this in the hunting scenario?
- if so, if a quick shot is needed, how do you perform this?
 

Bearlodge10

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Mar 17, 2014
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NE Wyoming
Welcome to the struggle of learning the back tension/hinge release. I will say that it is very much a learning curve and something you must get used to. I will try to answer the questions you posted but I will also suggest that you go to Padgettarchery.com | Home of Socket Man and review his suggestions for back tension firing engines.
1. Yes there will be twist in the d loop and yes to the back of the hand at the jaw. One can shoot such a release with your hand flatter but for me this makes it too difficult to get the hinge movement you need to get consistent execution.
2. Review the methods that padgett outlines and then get a length of string or rope and create a similar draw length set up to practice with. If you are like me this will be easy and you will think you are good but when actually doing it on the bow it will not work. Practice more and then some more. Keep in mind that if you haven't already you may need to make changes to peep, d loop and maybe even draw length for all the mechanics to work. Another tip is to let your index finger relax more when you start the hinge movement. This can hold everything else up and was difficult for me to change.
3. I personally don't hunt with a hinge. I only shoot with one as a means to work on form and experiment for target (Spot) shooting.
I believe that once you gain a true firing engine or method that works for you such shots are very much possible.

Also check out rrchery on youtube as well as nock-on as they each have good tid bits on shot execution.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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Bear

I cant tell you how much your response helped me. I just went back out to my set up and implemented the techniques and had several perfect releases- Thank you..
 

theleo91386

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Apr 1, 2016
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Eastern Washington
Take Bears advice and look up RCR as he does have some good advice on shooting a hinge.

I have the same release and I got it specifically so I could hunt with it. A trap a lot of guys fall in to when they first start with a hinge is the idea of just keep pulling and it goes off. The issue with that is that unless you're moving your elbow in an arc back behind you it will never work, you need to make that release rotate to fire. The way I treat my release is like a 2 stage trigger on a rifle, I get the sites where they need to be, take up the slack, and then concentrate on the last bit of resistance for the shot to break clean.

With my Honey 2 it goes like this:
1) Draw back to anchor.
2) Settle in the valley.
3) Take the safety off (I'm bearded and it only took me once letting it down while it was set to automatic to know that it's a bad idea)
4) Put the pin on the target.
6) Rotate the release via pressure from the outer most finger (this is causing the hinge to rotate some which in my trigger analogy is taking up the slack in the trigger) but stop before it goes off.
7) Concentrate pulling from my elbow, back behind me, to give me the last little bit of rotation and the surprise shot.

The good and the bad of this release is you can draw from really awkward positions and not worry about it going off but it has to rotate the same amount of degrees to fire from when you take the safety off. Other hinges release at the point you set them and that's it. You draw back, anchor, rotate it till you hear the click, then concentrate on that last part after the click. Without the click you end up guessing on how much slack to take up and when you need to concentrate on the pull through at the end of the sequence.

Hope this helps out some.
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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The release is sweet. I did not mechanically do it right the first time. The advice here makes total sense and with me rotating the hand and then pulling thru the back muscles, it fires beautifully. I cant believe how sweet it is.
I have been practice with my wrist release for some time getting ready for this hinge release. I buried my trigger release deep in my palm and utilized my back and shoulders to pull it thru rather than squeezing the trigger as normal. So the mechanics of a back tension are already there for me.

It was the proper hand rotation I was missing and confusion on the D loop being twisted in the jaw of the hinge.

My biggest concern was not being able to shoot quickly if needed, but that is resolved with the shot process of the wrist rotation and back pull speed from the shoulders.
Thx again- love this release, and like how it can hang on the D loop at the ready, just don't care for the clicking when I pull the bow back
 
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mfllood3800

mfllood3800

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My draw is way short now- I have to lean in to see the peep which also seems pretty low. And I just got the new sight dialed in- oh well.....
 
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