Cold weather layering for guys that sweat

Frank Grimes

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
152
Location
Canada, BC
Synthetic base layers for sure. That rab jacket looks like a good option too. Also, I sweat a lot too, and I learned to slow down. Hunting isn’t a race, take in the scenery. I find a slower pace much more enjoyable. You don’t have to “crush” everything in life.
 

Farmingdale's Finest

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2017
Messages
803
Location
NEW JERSEY
I disagree with this. I suffer from the same issue and getting dry clothes on is key to comfort for the remainder of the day.
OP in with you man/ I'm struggling to find the answer to this. My back always sweats with a backpack on.
Watch what John Barklow says. Before working in the outdoor industry he taught in the military how to survive in cold climates.

 

Wassid82

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
429
Merino wool has been the best answer for me. I have several different layering weights of shirts/pullovers and then have puffy jackets that I can through over the top during glassing sessions.
 

Wassid82

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
429
I've like ice breaker the best so far but I have tried smart wool and minus 33
 

Desk Jockey

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
4,273
Sweat hog here. A few things I have found:

- synthetic base layer tops - Patagonia or Sitka core lightweight. For a trip of more than a couple of days, I want to bring two and swap them out when damp.
- very breathable outer layers whenever possible. Soft shells turn into saunas for me with exertion so I like Sitka core heavy weight, Sitka traverse hoodie and grid fleece.
- attack and pro pants from kuiu - those hip zips are awesome
- zip off base layer from kuiu (fl makes them now too). I remove them for periods of exertion.
- easy on and off layers for static periods - because I have to strip down to move, I keep a layer like a jacket or puffy or a woobie very easy to access for stops so I can wrap up for warmth.
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
5,006
Location
Montana
What’s worked for me (well beyond just hunting) is OR’s Echo base layer top (I like the hoody one)- easily the quickest drying, breathable base layer I’ve ever used. A windshirt on top of that if needed (Patagonia Houdini or Black Diamond Alpine Start). For a mid-layer on the move nothing touches Patagonia’s Nano Air Light Air- sadly discontinued, but still available if you look (I recently purchased a backup one it’s so good).

Depending on conditions, the Nano Light over the base layer or Nano Light and windshirt over the base layer.

Like I said, this system is used almost year round for me.
 

JayTx

Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2018
Messages
50
Location
Texas
Like otherd have said. Hike in wearing just base layer once you get to where you're going put on a dry base layer. And slowly layer up as to not start sweating again. I usually will start layering up while I'm still plenty warm but not sweating. Granted I'm not in single digits either. Merino is best for me I freeze in synthetic base layers but I'm a scrawny guy.
 

BRTreedogs

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2017
Messages
3,724
Location
Central Oregon
I use these to help control my heat but cannot let my ears stay exposed. Works over a ball hat too.
I keep an s binder on my left hip belt to hang ball hat.
Usually can get these at home depot this time yr for $3
Screenshot_20201230-074309_Chrome.jpg
 

hereinaz

Senior Member
Rokslide Sponsor
Joined
Dec 21, 2016
Messages
977
Location
Arizona
Some of the commentators aren't sweaty, lol. I would have to leisurely stroll so slow as to barely call it hiking to avoid a sweat.

It isn't temperature management, it is sweat management, lol. I know I will get wet and plan on changing shirts and/or adding an "absorbent" mid layer that pulls moisture out of my base layer but stays warm, like merino or fleece. That can dry out in my pack as I hike or just from my body heat as I wear it.

Besides my torso, my socks are soaked through as well. Nothing I can do there so I wear merino to keep the stink down and switch them out regularly. My boots are wet inside after a couple days of good hiking in cold weather when they won't dry.

I don't get in weather much below 25. Synthetic base layer only to hike, rarely a vest that I can open and close on my front, but that is if I am stopping a little more or slowing and need to capture the heat.

Bottom line is that I just heat up and sweat like mad so merino is like wearing a wet sponge. Synthetic seems to dry more moisture out rather than hold it like merino.

I run a baseball hat, maybe something for the ears. I run a gaiter over my ears and nose if they need it. I will add merino wool pull on sleeves and merino gloves if the wind chill requires. Otherwise, blood flowing to arms and hands pulls heat out too. Anything else on my torso will get soaked. For pants, I don't run anything more than my Wranglers. I might put on thermals after ariving, or run a puffy pant.

Strategically, When I get to my location, I take off my wet base layer if it is too cold and will put on another shirt. With a clean shirt, I slowly layer on a beanie and then a light jacket or sweater as my body cools. Ending with puffy as needed. If the temps aren't too low, I just put on a Kuiu guide jacket with the pits unzipped and front open to let the moisture dry out fast.
 
OP
DanimalW

DanimalW

Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
58
Thanks again for all the responses. I’m going to give a good synthetic base layer a try. I also like the fleece head band idea to keep ears warm and head cool. It’s a cheap idea to try.
 

Appalaskan

Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2019
Messages
75
What’s worked for me (well beyond just hunting) is OR’s Echo base layer top (I like the hoody one)- easily the quickest drying, breathable base layer I’ve ever used. A windshirt on top of that if needed (Patagonia Houdini or Black Diamond Alpine Start). For a mid-layer on the move nothing touches Patagonia’s Nano Air Light Air- sadly discontinued, but still available if you look (I recently purchased a backup one it’s so good).

Depending on conditions, the Nano Light over the base layer or Nano Light and windshirt over the base layer.

Like I said, this system is used almost year round for me.
What temps are you taking this system down to? Thanks.
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
5,006
Location
Montana
Single digits, that's on the move and usually with all three top layers on.

If I expect single digits or below, I swap the OR base layer for a heavier base layer (Patagonia Thermal weight- top and bottom)- this is what I generally use for winter snowshoe/backcountry ski trips. Of course I choose an appropriate puffy to go over everything when stopped or at camp.
 

BluMtn

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2016
Messages
813
Location
Washington
I don't sweat much but I like my outer wear to have vent zips in them. My coats and pants have them and when I start to over heat I just start unzipping. As I start to cool when I stop I start zipping everything back up.
 

RCB

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2018
Messages
306
Location
CO
I find I don't need to wear base layer pants (long johns) if I'm hiking, even down to pretty low temps. Single digits, say, although wind can change that. That is, a single soft-shell layer over my legs is usually enough.

Might be obvious, but my general rule of thumb is: if I'm moving, I try to wear as little as possible. Removing layers *prior* to exercise - especially lower layers - is a pain, but spending a few minutes here and there to do it is better than having a wet base layer.
 

Lowg08

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2019
Messages
1,007
I’m a horrible sweater. I’ll be honest I didn’t read all the replies. When I’m day hunting I start cold. First lite Kanabs, wool t shirt and a hoody. I will use the hood on the hoody to regulate some heat. Once I get about 100 yards from where I’m trying to go I stop and strip all those off. Wipe down with a towel and put on my other clothes. I’m going to try zip offs this coming season to cut down on the extra pair of pants.

if I’m going for multiple days I hike in and set up camp in what I would hike in on a day hunt. From there it changes. I wear a light wool base bottom and depends on how cold it’s going to be for pants. Normally Sitka timberline. Here is a good option. Take a heavy down puffy set up and wear a rain suit over it. It will pack up small. The puffy helps generate heat and the rain suite keeps out the wind and holds in the heat. Also some hot hands body warmers on the chest and kidney area help on leaving some layers out.
 

The Ri Guy

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
315
Location
WA
To my fellow sweaters, how do you prevent your synthetic from stinking? I tried synthetic layers and they smell so bad after day 2 that it's not even worth hunting because everything smells you from a mile away. With merino shirts I can at least hang them at night and get 4-5 days out of them.

My solution for all weather down to about 0º is to simply accept that I'm going to soak my back and lower half, strip down to just my Merino t-shirt, open every pocket/leg vent possible, and be prepared to immediately put on every layer that I have once I stop.

Regarding going slow -- it would take me half a day to get to my morning glassing knob/stand if I went slow enough to not work up a sweat.
 

eod.mickelson

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2015
Messages
119
This thread has been awesome to read! I swear heavily, and this year I thought I'd give synthetic base layers a shot, however I got a kuiu pelton 118 and it was very itchy/irritating to my skin. Maybe I'll try Sitka or some other recommendations in here. Right now my plan is a first lite aerowool super light base then synthetics, figuring the thin aerowool will dry if I wear synthetics over it and when I'm glassing, use a puffy over it to "bake off" the sweat
 

Lowg08

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2019
Messages
1,007
To my fellow sweaters, how do you prevent your synthetic from stinking? I tried synthetic layers and they smell so bad after day 2 that it's not even worth hunting because everything smells you from a mile away. With merino shirts I can at least hang them at night and get 4-5 days out of them.

My solution for all weather down to about 0º is to simply accept that I'm going to soak my back and lower half, strip down to just my Merino t-shirt, open every pocket/leg vent possible, and be prepared to immediately put on every layer that I have once I stop.

Regarding going slow -- it would take me half a day to get to my morning glassing knob/stand if I went slow enough to not work up a sweat.
To answer the question about how to keep
Synthetic from stinking. I’m also interested because I can’t either. I’m with you on going slow too. I find it that I have to get it to be where I’m going dressed and still before daylight. I just get naked as fast as I can when I get there lol. 🥶
then have a great big smile when I get my dry clothes on
 

mtwarden

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
5,006
Location
Montana
The OR Echo tops do pretty well on the odor department, but if it's anything over 3 days- I use merino. They "key" for fast drying merino is a blend- I've found somewhere in the 60 merino/40 syn to be pretty optimal from an odor AND quicker drying perspective.

I have several Patagonia Merino 1 Silkweight tops that use roughly that blend, long discontinued, but guessing someone(s) are making blends still
 
Top