Cramp-Ons

keep

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Feb 29, 2012
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Springtown, TX
Which kind to get? I was just told it would be best to have some for my mt goat hunt. He said they didn't need to be real aggressive. Any suggestions?
 
OP
keep

keep

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Feb 29, 2012
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Springtown, TX
I will be going the first week in Aug. He said simple in case we need to cross a spot that still has snow because the snow is hard packed and slick because of the temps right now.
He said not agressive so I assume he is talking the micro-spikes type
 

rye_a

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Colorado
I have a set made by a company called Camp that are lightweight and built like a tank.
 

Becca

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I won't hike or hunt steep terrain without crampons anymore, as my broken leg on Kodiak likely could have been avoided if I had been wearing mine instead of leaving them in my pack. I used Hillsound Trail Crampons http://www.hillsound.com/2products/trail_crampon.php for all of last season, and was very happy with them. Although they don't have a fixed footplate, I never had any trouble with them sliding-- I bet the shank in my mountaineering boots helped prevent it though, so not sure they would do as well on boots with a lot of twist in the sole. The Hillsounds are also super easy to take on and off, as they use stretch rubber and Velcro to make them easily adjustable.

We Also have a couple sets of stubai fixed footplate crampons, and they work great...but a are lot heavier and more of hassle to don and doff. Probably overkill unless you are ice climbing. For most sheep and goat hunts I think the Hillsounds are more than adequate.
 

Bighorse

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Mar 15, 2012
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SE Alaska
For steep country I really like the Petzl instep crampons. I've used the Micro spikes and in moderate incline situations and timber they are helpful. When your wanting a genuine edge for the steep then more agressive points that completly engage the hillside are very desirable.

I wouldn't trust microspikes for my combined 300 pound body and load as it seeks for a miniture purchase in dangerous steep country. Give me a serious dig please! I'll take my time and make each foot fall count.

I also got real Corked boots made from Lowa Sheep hunters this year too. They were done by Hoffmans boots. I've yet to try them out in a hunting situation.
 

BuckSnort

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Mar 5, 2012
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Central CA
I won't hike or hunt steep terrain without crampons anymore, as my broken leg on Kodiak likely could have been avoided if I had been wearing mine instead of leaving them in my pack. I used Hillsound Trail Crampons http://www.hillsound.com/2products/trail_crampon.php for all of last season, and was very happy with them. Although they don't have a fixed footplate, I never had any trouble with them sliding-- I bet the shank in my mountaineering boots helped prevent it though, so not sure they would do as well on boots with a lot of twist in the sole. The Hillsounds are also super easy to take on and off, as they use stretch rubber and Velcro to make them easily adjustable.

We Also have a couple sets of stubai fixed footplate crampons, and they work great...but a are lot heavier and more of hassle to don and doff. Probably overkill unless you are ice climbing. For most sheep and goat hunts I think the Hillsounds are more than adequate.

Becca, You don't wanna do any glissading or grass sliding wile wearing crampon's.. They can bite into the terrain and send you tumbling and or break an ankle.. Best to do what you tried to do with you're trekking poles (self arrest) and slow down or stop..
 

kaboku68

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Jun 14, 2012
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211
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Alaska
I have black Diamond Cyborgs but I go to a specific place where I may have to cross a glacier(with ice faces and crevices) six to seven times. I tried instep crampons and I actually bent the
metal on the insteps when I was walking on the morraines. August is pretty early you should be able to kick in steps. Go with one iceaxe 1 treking pole combo.

Best,
Thomas
 

Becca

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Becca, You don't wanna do any glissading or grass sliding wile wearing crampon's.. They can bite into the terrain and send you tumbling and or break an ankle.. Best to do what you tried to do with you're trekking poles (self arrest) and slow down or stop..
I agree completely, which is why I wasn't wearing them...but given my not so fun experience, I don't know how much more glissading (or butt sliding as we call it) I will do again. I think I could have descended safely on foot with crampons, though the going still would have been treacherous...
 

BuckSnort

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My bad Becca... I read you're post wrong..I was assuming you were thinking you could have controlled the speed of your slide if you had been wearing them.. That's what I get for assuming :)
 

Becca

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My bad Becca... I read you're post wrong..I was assuming you were thinking you could have controlled the speed of your slide if you had been wearing them.. That's what I get for assuming :)
Not at all, I wasn't very clear. Things could have been way worse if I had been sliding AND wearing crampons :) Think my butt sliding days are over, slow and steady wins the race :)
 
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