Crispi.....one boot to rule them all!

RangerRick

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Jan 3, 2021
Messages
34
I’m looking to upgrade my boots, and was able to try on a pair of Crispi Guide Non-Insulated. They felt great, I enjoyed the stiffness.

My question is, if I wanted to buy one pair of Crispi boot that would do it all, what would you guys recommend? I hunt WA state, possibly gonna tag along with a buddy in Montana this year. I like the idea of light and fast but also know the more support in a heavier boot is beneficial under heavy loads or side hills.
I’ll be upgrading from a pair of Danners.
Thanks.
 

Trumpkin The Dwarf

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Feb 18, 2013
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790
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Texas
You *can* do everything with a 7-8" uninsulated boot and good gaiters. It may not always be the best boot for what you're doing though.

You also can make 10" lightly insulated boots work everywhere except desert country.

I like 7-8" personally, but the Kennetrek Mountain Extreme is trying hard to sway my opinions.
 

Brightwhite

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Feb 16, 2015
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1,732
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Colorado
If I had one boot I'd have more money :)

But I would say the Nevada is probably the true jack of all, master of none.

Just stay away from a synthetic blend boot...great for high and dry weather, but they will get wet. For one boot go all leather where you can wax them and treat them for snow and rainy conditions.
 

Bzn_Hunter

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Dec 23, 2016
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96
Location
Bozeman, MT
Agree with others. I think a good uninsulated 8" boot can do mostly everything. Personally I went with Schnee's Beartooth 0g with gaitors when its colder, but the Crispi Guides look cool.
 

thinhorn_AK

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Jul 2, 2016
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Alaska
The guide is a great boot. Especially the uninsulated version. I also really like the birksdall SF. I suppose if I had to pick one single boot, I’d go with one of those.
 

Dominic06

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Jun 13, 2021
Messages
64
My preference is for a taller boot, ended up with the Idaho. Two seasons so far, they’ve stayed dry and comfortable.

This is completely unrelated , but do you have an Instagram? I want to talk with you about pig hunting.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

TheArdentOutdoorsman

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Dec 22, 2017
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189
Location
OH/VA
Is Crispi your only option? Just curious. For a "one boot to rule them all" I'd be thinking an uninsulated full leather boot, in which there are better options than Crispi imo. I recently bought a pair of Schnees Beartooth II, for the purpose you mentioned,, and couldn't be happier. Schnees makes a superb boot, my only regret is not buying a pair sooner.
 

HNTR918

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
Messages
278
Location
Colorado
I run the Crispi Thor 2's all year round.
Thin wool socks in Texas summer.
Add a liner for September Colorado.
Add a heavy wool sock for November & December.
Overboots when glassing in sub 0 temps.
 

ndforbes

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Feb 4, 2015
Messages
49
Location
Colorado
There are lot of good options out there. For me, my Crispi Idahos have been the best jack of all trades that I have worn. They aren't full leather, so there is a durability trade off, but they are light, protective, and super comfortable. Last year I hunted a new spot in September that was loaded with steep, loose scree slopes and I never had any ankle or foot pain after 10 days of hunting and packing meat.
 

Doc89

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Sep 19, 2015
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130
Location
Eastern Iowa
I'll add a vote for an all leather non-insulated style of boot. 8" are great, don't be afraid of a 10" boot if you need the extra ankle support. For Crispi, the Nevada & Guide's are pretty sweet boots. Take care of the leather and they will stay waterproof and last a long time. Invest in good socks and a variety of them. Heard great things about Schnees, Zamberlan, Hanwag, Whites, Kennetrek... they all make something similar in "spec" to the Crispi Nevada/Guide's. The Crispi's are likely an easier frame of reference since they have gained so much popularity and there's lots of places carrying them. You may just consider what will be best case for the majority of your hunting and make it work for the rest. If you are never going to hunt in cold temps you may favor a synthetic for breathability. Vice versa for warm weather. hope that helps sir!
 

Cactus kid

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Jul 17, 2013
Messages
364
Scarpa Ribelle HD. The rocker on these things are unreal. Stiff enough to be considered a mountaineering boot. Rides good enough to be running shoes in a pinch. amazed at these boots.
 

Packin_packout

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Nov 1, 2019
Messages
195
Running the Idaho for several years now, worn one set of soles out. Good until you start getting into heavy snow. Never had issues with moisture bleeding thru....Will get clammy when walking through streams. Once it starts turning towards mid October I switch over to my insulated kennetreks. Have not found a way to have just one boot but I wander hunt from Arizona to Montana and pretty much outside somewhere every month.
 

mtwarden

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Oct 18, 2016
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Montana
I'm also using the Crispi Thor for all but late season elk ( I go to a tall pac boot for deep snow/cold). It's pretty light for a stiff boot and the fit on my foot is near perfect. Comfortable in a very wide range of temps.

90% is really in the fit; it goes without saying that not all boots are going to be good fit, regardless of how well designed and constructed.
 

Desk Jockey

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Apr 5, 2015
Messages
4,206
Crispi fan here and +1 for black ovis also.

I have run Thor’s from the Grand Canyon to snow With a set of gaiters. For super cold, I would want some insulation but I really like them As an all around boot. Mine have stayed water proof and the uppers have held up well. If I had a gripe, it is that the soles seem to wear a little fast. I have a set of Idaho’s too. Love them but they see a lot less use since I found the Thor’s. If I was spending a lot of time in cold snow, I might go with an insulated Nevada.
 

Wags

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May 31, 2021
Messages
301
Location
California
I have a set of Nevada's, no real issues except when it's hot out. My feet sweat in general & we all know leather doesn't breath as well as Cordura so my feet get pretty hot in them. That's been my only issue with them so far.
 

furfishngame

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2020
Messages
14
Do the Thor’s have the same “rocking” style footbed/sole as the Nevada’s do?

I generally prefer about a 10” or so boot for the all around boot. When you get into snow, much, and what have you less chance of getting the legs wet and soaking down. Happy hunting!
 

Vandy321

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Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
1,780
Location
CO
Briksdal. The 200g insulation is not too much for summer scouting and good enough for Nov hunts too. 3rd year with them, boot has been incredibly durable and molds to my foot. Sole is tacky but has worn very slowly. Stiff enough for scree/blowdown in both the shank and the ankle support, but I also wear them all winter in the neighborhood walking the dogs, no issues on flats, no overboard rocker like on other more mountaineering boots.
 

Rock-o

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
Messages
411
At this early stage in my new found western hunting interest I have my one pair. Certainly in the minority, I think, preferring a tall boot and having "cool" feet. Crispi Hunter GTX is for me. But I don't do any early season hunts either. Though I did wear them late Winter/early Spring this year where the temperatures, if I recall correctly, may have almost hit 60F one of the days. My feet were certainly warm but most temps on that one-off hunt were 30-50F.
 
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