Determining maximum range

Teaman1

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Dec 26, 2016
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Location
Redfield, South Dakota
I was wondering how to go about determining a bullets max range. I see many people saying to keep atleast 1000 ft/lbs of energy as a general guideline but when I check a calculator some bullets are traveling below listed expansion velocities still have 1000 ft/lbs of energy left. Do people shoot for high shoulder and use bone to help the bullet expand or what exactly is the deal. Can 1000 pounds of energy break shoulders?
I limit myself to 500 yards currently for practice reasons, but also because I'm not sure on determining a max range. My current hunting bullet is a 200 grain accubond out of a 300 weatherby. Any help or info would be greatly appreciated.
 

Jordan Smith

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Jun 13, 2013
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Alberta
The technical limit to a bullet's max effective range on animals, assuming appropriate application of bullet to animal, is the minimum expansion velocity. Forget about ft-lbs of kinetic energy.
 
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Speeddmn

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Sep 21, 2016
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Hill AFB, UT
Pretty easy, the manufacture should list the min velocity for max expansion. Determine your ballistics and find that velocity, if it is 764 yards, then that is your range. If it is 1011 yards then so be it. No matter what you should never (IMHO) shoot beyond your comfort zone. I practice to 500 and I am comfortable to 600. Anything beyond that I feel as a hunter I owe it to myself and the animal to do my best and get closer. I will always attempt to get as close as I can. Luckily I haven't had the need to take an animal beyond 245 yet.
 

dah605

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Jun 12, 2016
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Pittsburgh, PA
I use the lesser distance of a number of metrics to determine max range. The most important is the minimum velocity for expansion, which for a lot of bullets is in the 1800fps range. I then use 1500ft/lbs for larger game like elk and 1000ft/lbs for deer sized animals. The energy based ones are very rough guidelines that seem to generate a lot of arguing... I figure they give me a reference point that accounts for larger bones and thicker skin in an elk.

Also keep in mind that caliber has a lot if impact on the results. In general, 30 cal bullet will be more effective than a 7mm with the same speed/energy.

The most important part is to know your own shooting limits... I practice at 600 yards since that is the longest range at the local clubs. I use clays as my reference point--it is fun busting them and they are small enough that I'm comfortable with taking an animal at that distance when I can hit them very consistently. This is in a calm situation at the range so add in adrenaline and unusual shooting positions and the groups will likely open up in the field a little.

-David
 
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Teaman1

Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2016
Messages
53
Location
Redfield, South Dakota
Thanks for the replies guys. What you guys are saying is what I try to use for myself. I asked mainly because I see certain people on tv shooting at animals at distances should fall below the listed expansion speeds. They probably tested minimum expansion in gel or something, but it just made me really curious.
Thanks
 
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