Do insoles require break in?

PhlyanPan

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Dec 29, 2019
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Sorry if this has been covered but I couldn't find it.

Got a pair of crispi west rivers. I like the boots but I feel like the insoles could have better cushion and support. I've got probably 3-5 miles on them so far so it's very early. If I do decide to change the insoles how much break in should I plan on for a new insole?
 

Tauntohawk

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Jan 15, 2015
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I feel like my superfeet ones always need a few days of standing on them to start feeling right.

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Jimss

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Mar 6, 2015
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I toss all the insoles that come with new boots. The more padding the better for my particular feet. No need for break in with padded insoles. I use and abuse my boots every day at work and replace insoles around twice a year.
 

5MilesBack

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I use Superfeet Orange in all my boots and even some dress shoes and my golf shoes. They're always good for me from the day I put them in.
 

Poser

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I think it’s more like you just have to get used to them. That being said, if they aren’t comfortable for you, you may not have the correct insole for your arch.

The thing with performance footwear is this:
They should not come with insoles. There is no way you can have a 1 size fits all insole. People have flat feet, high arches, medium arches, everything in between. Ideally, quality performance footwear would come with a coupon for a insole and you would get fitted and take it from there.

I’ve spent some time helping people get setup with snowboarding gear and you just wouldn’t believe the push back you get from people who are spending $500+ on a pair of boots when you tell them they need a $50 custom insole as the stock one is garbage.
 
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PhlyanPan

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Joined
Dec 29, 2019
Messages
32
I think it’s more like you just have to get used to them. That being said, if they aren’t comfortable for you, you may not have the correct insole for your arch.

The thing with performance footwear is this:
They should not come with insoles. There is no way you can have a 1 size fits all insole. People have flat feet, high arches, medium arches, everything in between. Ideally, quality performance footwear would come with a coupon for a insole and you would get fitted and take it from there.

I’ve spent some time helping people get setup with snowboarding gear and you just wouldn’t believe the push back you get from people who are spending $500+ on a pair of boots when you tell them they need a $50 custom insole as the stock one is garbage.
In their defense...it's not crazy to think that a $500 boot should be pretty damn perfect.
 

Poser

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In their defense...it's not crazy to think that a $500 boot should be pretty damn perfect.
That’s completely fair, however, the ski industry has done a great job over the years of educating their customer base as a whole about the idea that even though you are spending $600-$800+ on ski boots, you will have to have some customization to make them fit in a performance based manner. For whatever reason, the snowboard industry has failed to do the same and people expect out of the box fit. The same trickles down to hiking boots which is why I think that high end boot makers should just stop including stock insoles and offer a coupon for a insole instead. That forces the hand of the consumer to think about how a boot fits their feet overall and how insoles make or break you.
 

Hondo

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Jan 2, 2020
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I believe it is more of a matter of your feet getting broken in to the insole than the other way around. With boots there is some of both going on. When I use a new insole, which is generally a brand and style I have already been using I don't notice any difference other than the texture on top not being worn. If it has a higher arch than what you have been used to the greater the adjustment time. For reference I typically use Superfeet Green although I have used SF Merino (Green based) SF Orange, SF Copper (avoid these as the heel stabilizers will destroy a Gore-Tex Liner), Vionic Orthaheel, Lathrop and Meindl Cork insoles.
 

Piscatory_4

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Dec 16, 2014
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I have a pair of those meindl cork ones, can't get them to fit in any boots, they are even a size smaller than the boot.
 
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