Dog training deer recovery

Brownclown

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Jan 27, 2021
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Any of you train for deer recovery? Any kits or programs you recommend? I have recently gotten involved with dog sport called Mondioring. Im loving bringing out a dog's capabilites and would love to add this skill to there list.
 

Zak406

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Aug 29, 2021
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What kind of dog? Out of curiosity.

There is a kit I have seen on dog bone if you Google it.

He has a bunch of videos online. Never used it myself but it may be a good place to start
 

Wellsdw

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I have a Belgium malinois trained to “track” for recovery. It’s a blast for sure. But you have to set the dog up for success. Properly laid tracks is crucial. Train the dog
To their breed type. Meaning a shepherd trails differently than a retriever, which learns different than a pointer which is different than a hound and so on… end of the day if they have a ball drive they will trail. Pm if you want more info
 

Clovis

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You might want to check out blood trailing training information from the JGHV (umbrella training group for the versatile breeds in Germany)--there are some good ideas/tips there as blood tracking is a part of their testing system you can google up. "Tracking Dogs for Finding Wounded Deer" a book by John Jeanneney is about as good as it gets for a resource. Ideally you need blood, a way of dripping or dabbing it, a deer hide and a way to mark the trail so that you can follow it without the dog knowing. My dog was more interested in other smells than the deer blood but once he figured out what I wanted and was rewarding and particularly once he started recovering real deer, he has gotten into it and we have had good success. If you deer hunt or have friends that do, you can also ask them to give your dog a chance to track even where they don't need it (especially when they don't need it because if they do need it most likely someone has walked all over the start of the trail).
 

49ereric

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My dogs would find downed deer without any training. Take em out into the woods and they run around having the time of their life but when you don’t hear them running anymore they are sniffing the dead deer.
they never failed if the deer is dead. I wouldn’t say they followed a blood trail but no need to. Might take a while going in circles but it works.
 

Little Joe

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Apr 12, 2021
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You might want to check out blood trailing training information from the JGHV (umbrella training group for the versatile breeds in Germany)--there are some good ideas/tips there as blood tracking is a part of their testing system you can google up.
As stated above.

Blood tracking has been part of the German testing system for a long time. There are multiple breed associations under the JGHV umbrella that teach and test blood tracking. German training standards are high. Methods are efficient and effective. Collectively, I suspect the JGHV and its organizations have more knowledge, experience and expertise in the area than any other group out there.
 

MJB

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I do blood training with my Jagds first, then once that's completed I do tarsal training for hunting bucks with dogs. They will leave the does alone and only run the bucks. If I don't get the blood tracking down first they will run any deer and the blood tracking will be an uphill battle.

I use a verbal term like "dead deer" for tracking any blood from any mammal. I just use a leg bone wet it down and start the drag. leave the bone at the end of the track for his reward a little hide on the bone is a must.
Start really short tracks then get more complicated with loops and big circles also watch the wind the dog will cheat if they get the chance. When laying a blood track don't use lots of blood most blood trailing in real life when you need a dog has very little blood.

Always end on a good note and make it short so they want it even more.

Find your local Archery shop and talk to them, most have a Jagd terrier or know of someone with a good dog for tracking and ask to come along on the next tracking.

The hardest tracking is in sand or loose dirt, when the blood hits the dirt it gets covered up then some hunter walks on it and it's gone.........
 

TSAMP

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Unitedbloodtrackers.org is a resource as well.
I tried to join as it became legal in iowa a couple years ago and my dog already had a few years under his belt and did it well. They seemed setup all on social media and didn't have any info of literature to share outside of those platforms so I just let my membership expire and continued doing my own thing.
Might be worth a look if your on one of those.
 

Little Joe

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Lots of good advice.

Since running deer with dogs is illegal most places. A lot of hunters will shoot a dog without hesitation if they see it near a downed deer or think your dog is running deer. I always kept my dogs on a leash when blood tracking.
 

Wellsdw

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What kind of dog do you have? IMO I believe you are training to “trail or track” what you tell it too. The scent is irreverent. But I will hone him in during season with blood or Hoof gland. At the end i of the day you need them to not trail deer but instead (A specific) deer. That said off season I’ll just let him track what ever scent I have. Once I sprayed “scent killer” on my boots for him to track. To prove a point to a buddy
 

Little Joe

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Currently I don’t have a dog. All have passed on. Hunted VDD Drahthaars. Trained to blood track according to the German testing requirements.
 

Kindo

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I started with mine as a pup with hot dogs and fresh beef blood. First thing was to put bloody hot dog bits on the ground and bring the pup up and point to the spot so they learn to check what you’re pointing at.

Then start laying bread crumb trails with blood and chopped up hot dogs with more treats at the end with a final transition of just blood on the trail and hot dogs at the end. After that, all you’ve got to do is get them on a couple easy tracks and they’ll connect the dots.

I’d also just let her lick up blood when we’re doing other training just to reinforce things.

Just keep things calm and let your dog figure it out.
 

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Little Joe

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:) love it. Great pic.

Kindo, Great tip. Makes life easy. Wish I would have thought of that when I was training my dogs.
 
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Brownclown

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Thanks all some great stuff here. I have German Shepherds. Prior to moving into Mondioring I was interested in IGP/Shutzhund but didn't have luck finding clubs in my area. IGP has a tracking requirement so i did some very basic intro work with scent pads and food. Kindo's tips seem similar to what I started. On this years harvest I will save blood and other items to start training. Is there a benefit to saving and training blood vs say gut? In my experience most deer that need searches are gut shot.
 

49ereric

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Thanks all some great stuff here. I have German Shepherds. Prior to moving into Mondioring I was interested in IGP/Shutzhund but didn't have luck finding clubs in my area. IGP has a tracking requirement so i did some very basic intro work with scent pads and food. Kindo's tips seem similar to what I started. On this years harvest I will save blood and other items to start training. Is there a benefit to saving and training blood vs say gut? In my experience most deer that need searches are gut shot.
Never saw a gut shot deer go far but…
Shots over the vitals and under the spine the deer usually lays down asap but head is up. I did that a couple of times but second shot was possible from the stand.
lower front leg shot is why most deer get away cuz they move good on 3 legs.
 

Wellsdw

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Thanks all some great stuff here. I have German Shepherds. Prior to moving into Mondioring I was interested in IGP/Shutzhund but didn't have luck finding clubs in my area. IGP has a tracking requirement so i did some very basic intro work with scent pads and food. Kindo's tips seem similar to what I started. On this years harvest I will save blood and other items to start training. Is there a benefit to saving and training blood vs say gut? In my experience most deer that need searches are gut shot.
Blood type is irreverent because they are tracking a combination of things only one of which is blood. Skin cells, interdigital gland, pheromones etc. we truly don’t know what they are actually smelling and trailing if that make sense. As stated earlier you are teaching them More to track what you tell them too.
 
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