Dream job?

Hardstalk

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Joined
Apr 29, 2012
Messages
1,094
All of us here have pretty common interests. I am curious what everyones dream job would be and why?
 

Titaniumman

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Joined
May 29, 2012
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251
Location
N.W.Montana
I guess I'm one of the lucky ones to have been able to do their dream job until I had to take a medical retirement. I went back to work 8 months later, and now my dream job is to be retired! :)
 

Brandon Pattison

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Joined
Feb 25, 2012
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2,829
Location
Michigan
What thewildnorth does on YouTube in the winter and what Billy Molls' clients do in the fall and archery shop in the spring and what Cliff Jacobsen does in the summer.
 

JNDEER

Senior Member
Joined
May 2, 2012
Messages
1,046
I can do anything, so a dream job is just any job that put food in my mouth, gas in my car and money to allow me to hunt as I see fit.
 

tstowater

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Joined
Apr 26, 2012
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1,203
Location
Iowa
Not to rain on anyone's parade, but a dream job becomes just that-- a job. Sooner or later, you would get tired of it and loose your appreciation for why you wanted to do it in the first place. The only thing I would want is for my wife to take a second job so I could hunt more. When I have asked her to do that, she has politely declined. I enjoy the desire of wanting to be elsewhere. If I was there, I would want to be someplace different. I live in Iowa, a whitetail capital, and people think I am crazy for not hunting deer here all the time. The grass is always greener elsewhere. I learned this from a wise person when I was finishing school when he thought I was crazy for wanting to move to Montana just to hunt (and work). That person loved to fish and had the Yellowstone in his backyard, but didn't fish there because it had lost its appeal to him. Still love to hunt in Montana if I don't have to compete with the wolf and grizzlies.
 

RUTTIN

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Joined
Jun 5, 2012
Messages
357
Location
Kamas, Utah
My dream job would be to win the lottery, have all the money I would ever need. I could hunt, fish or do anything, or nothing that I wanted when I wanted.
 

Broken Arrow

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Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
230
Location
Grain valley, Mo
My dream job would be to be well off enough to devote my time to taking kids that might otherwise never learn how to hunting and fishing. Maybe a camp of some sort with fishing shooting guns bows trapping how to etc. deck them out with free camo.
 

bobhunts

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Joined
Jun 16, 2012
Messages
964
Location
Colorado Springs,Co.
Building custom Rifles. It has kinda been a draw to me for some time. Particularly doing the custom engraving in the woodwork all by hand and actually seeing the finished product being shot. I know someone that does it and I kinda think he is under pressure to finish enough rifles on time to meet demand. Maybe when I'm done spreading cardboard for UPS I might pick up this for a real job.
 

Jager

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Joined
Apr 25, 2012
Messages
658
Location
Australia
Not to rain on anyone's parade, but a dream job becomes just that-- a job. Sooner or later, you would get tired of it and loose your appreciation for why you wanted to do it in the first place. The only thing I would want is for my wife to take a second job so I could hunt more. When I have asked her to do that, she has politely declined. I enjoy the desire of wanting to be elsewhere. If I was there, I would want to be someplace different. I live in Iowa, a whitetail capital, and people think I am crazy for not hunting deer here all the time. The grass is always greener elsewhere. I learned this from a wise person when I was finishing school when he thought I was crazy for wanting to move to Montana just to hunt (and work). That person loved to fish and had the Yellowstone in his backyard, but didn't fish there because it had lost its appeal to him. Still love to hunt in Montana if I don't have to compete with the wolf and grizzlies.
Probably one of the best posts I have read on any forum for a long time, I agree 100%.
 

Matt Palmquist

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
112
Location
Kansas
Not to rain on anyone's parade, but a dream job becomes just that-- a job. Sooner or later, you would get tired of it and loose your appreciation for why you wanted to do it in the first place. The only thing I would want is for my wife to take a second job so I could hunt more. When I have asked her to do that, she has politely declined. I enjoy the desire of wanting to be elsewhere. If I was there, I would want to be someplace different. I live in Iowa, a whitetail capital, and people think I am crazy for not hunting deer here all the time. The grass is always greener elsewhere. I learned this from a wise person when I was finishing school when he thought I was crazy for wanting to move to Montana just to hunt (and work). That person loved to fish and had the Yellowstone in his backyard, but didn't fish there because it had lost its appeal to him. Still love to hunt in Montana if I don't have to compete with the wolf and grizzlies.
I agree with Jager on tstowater's post....Dream Job? Is there such a thing....everything gets old eventually and at times becomes a place you would rather avoid. My Dream Job is the same as RUTTIN....win the LOTTO! My current job is a good job.....I get plenty of time off of work, and most days I enjoy going to work. That is the most important aspect of a job IMO.

Matt
 

Darin Cooper

Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
879
Location
Idaho
I had my dream job for almost 10 years as a Sr. Product engineer for Hoyt designing bows and archery accessories. As an engineer, professional target archer, and hard-core bowhunter, this was really a job that I looked forward to every day. I spent my time dreaming up ways to improve equipment to make me a more effective archer and bowhunter. It was extremely rewarding and opened a lot of doors to other things. I look back on my time there with pride and fond memories. I still have a ton of great friendships there and continue to keep in touch with and hunt with the old crew.

Don't get me wrong... there was a TON of hard work that went into it as well, and there were parts of the job that I didn't like but the motivation to excel and to work hard came from my own personal passion for the sport and competitive desire. I miss working at the Hoyt factory pretty much every day...

I left when a great business opportunity came about back home in Idaho. That was a really tough decision to make, but I had to take the opportunity.

I still work with Hoyt's engineering team from time to time, but I miss the constant immersion in the design process, busting butt, cranking out prototypes and all the creative aspects. We had an outstanding TEAM. It all started as a "dream", but through a lot of hard work, I was able to turn it into reality and it's a time in my career that brought me the most joy. I also accomplished a lot of personal archery and hunting success in that time - not in spite of, but more as a result of all that the experience brought to me. I wouldn't trade those years, the relationships, or all the learning and experience for anything...

Coop
 

Kevin Root

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
369
Location
San Jose, California, United States
There are so many things I love doing. Photography, hunting, fishing and just being in God's awesome outdoors to name a few. I've often thought, would I be happier getting paid to do any or all of them full time? For me the answer was perhaps not but that's also not a page written yet in my book of life :). I enjoy, I'm very grateful and blessed having the job I have today and the opportunities, privileges and freedom that I've been given.

That all being said, I believe there in is a lot of truth to the saying, "It's better to be a failure at something you love than be a success at something you hate."
 
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