Eggs!

colonel00

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
4,831
Location
Lost
Ah, ok. So it's basically a hot water bath and you are just whisking the eggs with your spork inside the bag while it's in the water?
 

summer57

Newbie
Joined
Apr 17, 2019
Messages
2
Location
Canada
The only eggs I eve r take are roe eggs, like there in cans are always handy and you don't get board with the simple food.
 

LionHead

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Messages
231
Location
Central Valley, CA
Good link need to experiment.

In the article she mentions keeping the egg off cookware after rehydration as if it were raw egg.

In my experience with raw meat to jerky no other prep is needed to eat. It's not like you cook jerky, the drying kills any bacteria.

I'm wondering if it's the same with eggs.

After 10 hrs @ 140* should you not just be able to rehydrate with boiling water and eat? Am I missing something? Is there another reason for additional cooking after rehydration?

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 

MikeyBfromMT

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
19
Location
Billings
It’s still raw egg. I get what you’re saying, though. It’s just an alternative and you need to experiment.

Besides, everyone eats raw cookie dough and that safe.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Kevin Dill

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
1,943
Eggs + Salmonella = sick person. A perfectly normal egg may have salmonella bacteria inside or externally. I can't say for certain what temperatures and conditions eliminate it, but some bacteria are incredibly resilient and able to 'reactivate' if you will after long periods of dormancy. So my take on real eggs is...yeah...superb and not much of a huge gamble. But if you hit the unlucky egg which isn't well cooked you may have regrets. Pass the cookie dough!
 

Bl704

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
283
Location
Charlotte NC
Fwiw USDA recommends 160 for egg dishes to kill salmonella. So my question is, if I dehydrate raw egg, rehydrate with boiling h2o...will the egg cook up properly?

If not, the old boy scout method of rehydration with cold h2o + maybe some dehydrated veg, in a freezer ziploc and then plunge in boiling h2o to cook.
 

MikeyBfromMT

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
19
Location
Billings
Eggs + Salmonella = sick person. A perfectly normal egg may have salmonella bacteria inside or externally. I can't say for certain what temperatures and conditions eliminate it, but some bacteria are incredibly resilient and able to 'reactivate' if you will after long periods of dormancy. So my take on real eggs is...yeah...superb and not much of a huge gamble. But if you hit the unlucky egg which isn't well cooked you may have regrets. Pass the cookie dough!
:ROFLMAO:
 

MikeyBfromMT

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Messages
19
Location
Billings
Fwiw USDA recommends 160 for egg dishes to kill salmonella. So my question is, if I dehydrate raw egg, rehydrate with boiling h2o...will the egg cook up properly?
If you read the comments section of the article people rave about it. I think the water to egg ratio is key. But you just cook them like real scrambled eggs.
 

LionHead

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Messages
231
Location
Central Valley, CA
Ok I hear what your saying Kevin makes sense now

Also wonder the same if rehydrated with boiling water. Either way will experiment. I eat way too many eggs at home not to try in the back country

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 

jmden

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
625
Location
Washington State
Get fresh eggs from a farmer or friend that hasn't been washed. They will keep for a long time just sitting on the counter. Once you wash off the egg is when you have to refrigerate. Fresh unwashed eggs in a plastic container and you'll be good for awhile.
Yep. Buy eggs in grocery stores in some countries and they are not refrigerated because they have not been washed. Was in Costa Rica a couple of years ago and saw this--why aren't the eggs in the refrigerator? Turns out there's other ways of doing things...
 

mro

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2017
Messages
24
Location
CA
Another vote for Ova Easy crystals (mix in some milk powder for best taste) and a negative vote for those yellow Coghlan egg cases. The cases have sharp pointy teeth that puncture your eggs, are heavier than the regular cardboard egg case, and dont prevent leakage if your eggs breaks. I've had better luck just putting a regular egg carton in a ziploc bag at the top of my pack.
 

GreenV

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2014
Messages
19
The plastic carriers work for me, but pre-scrambled idea would work if you had a way to keep them cool.
 

87TT

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2019
Messages
859
Location
Idaho
I have been using Ova Easy eggs for over10 years. One of my favorite ways is to Have some dehydrated hash brown potatoes with dehydrated peppers and onions in a ziplock. I pour boiling water on and let them re hydrate for a few minutes. Then brown them in a pan and add Ova easy eggs that have been reconstituted. Salt and pepper and enjoy. Another fav is to take some shelf stable chorizo sausage and chop it up and add it to the eggs when cooking.
 

ctjester123

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
11
Location
WY
Ditto on the unrefrigerated eggs staying edible... I lived in Central American for a couple years where eggs aren’t strictly refrigerated like ours in the US. I learned under a week outside of the fridge is reasonable. You’ll do fine if you keep the shells intact before cooking, trust your nose and taste buds, and cook them thoroughly.
 

Kevin Dill

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2014
Messages
1,943
Both of my grandparents raised chickens for eggs and meat. They never ever ever refrigerated their eggs. I recall them sitting on the shelf in the curtain-covered pantry. The eggs.....not my grandparents.
 
Top