Electronic In Ear Hearing Protection Recommendations

ElPollo

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
164
I’ve been using sordin pro x muffs for my raange ear pro for a number of years and got some Otto noizebarriers this spring as I had a bunch of yard/chainsaw work and I hate wearing the muffs while working in the heat.

The sound is a little more natural than my sordin muffs. I got some aftermarket ear buds from Amazon for a tighter fit. Battery life seems pretty decent. They do not muffle sound as well as muffs and I would not use them as dedicated range ear pro but I do prefer them for use when active. My understanding is inside the ear will never be able to reduce db like a good muff. I plan to use them hunting with aggressively braked magnum rifles as they will work at least as well as quickly jammed in horseshoe around the neck plugs I used previously.
I agree with you that muffs are generally better for range work. Higher NRR ratings. You’re experience is interesting because the Ottos are supposed to have an NRR of 40dB which is more than most muffs.

How are the Ottos with background noise like wind or walking through brush? I’d also be interested to know how much battery life you get out of them per charge.
 

wind gypsy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2014
Messages
4,991
I agree with you that muffs are generally better for range work. Higher NRR ratings. You’re experience is interesting because the Ottos are supposed to have an NRR of 40dB which is more than most muffs.

How are the Ottos with background noise like wind or walking through brush? I’d also be interested to know how much battery life you get out of them per charge.

I’d have to do a little more detailed analysis at the range. I’ve only used em when almost everyone was shooting 22s and one guy at the end of the line was shooting a 223. They just didn’t seem to reduce noise as much.

I haven’t had them in much wind. Just bumming around the woods with a chainsaw and when doing a lot of cutting, grinding, hammering on some yard projects. I didn’t notice anything that would bother me though.
 

Kenn

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
145
Location
Oregon
I've been using the Peltor EEP-100 and they're ok, but not great. When using in the ear hearing protection there are two important elements and they don't overlap much. The most important is the ability to block sound, and that is dependent on the earplug seal in your ear. A standard hearing aid has a hard shell and that is not very good at blocking sound, so if you use that style you may not get the hearing protection you need. The second element is the electronics, which amplify the lower level sounds, and are programmed not to amplify sound above a certain decibel level. Although they don't amplify loud sounds, they cannot block them if you have a poor seal.

Most of the electronic ear plugs have interchangeable plugs so you can use the ones that fit best. To try them out I turn up a radio pretty loud and try them all, and practice how to insert them for the best blockage. You want to do that WITHOUT the amplification on. If you get too good of a seal you’ll form a vacuum that can be pretty unpleasant. If you pop your ears it helps a lot.
 

LeftyWilbury

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2014
Messages
47
Location
Western Montana
I use the Peltor Tactical 500 at the range. A little bulky but I really like them. Solid noise reduction with really clear sound. I don't use the bluetooth feature.

Hunting I wear the Otto Noizebarriers all day. Haven't had the battery run out on me yet and having the case able to recharge them is nice if I decide to do a few over-nights. The "up to 40 dB of impulse noise reduction" is up to some sort of debate with reality, whereas the "NRR: 28 dB(Foam Tips); 23 dB (3-Flange Tips)" that's in their spec sheet seems a bit more realistic. I use the foam tips and find it suitable enough for hunting with my 7 rem mag where I'm taking one shot (ok, maybe two...). I wouldn't rely on them at the range, and I don't. Why should I when I have better tools? I do like to have them on their louder setting when hunting. While there can be wind noise and crunchy footsteps that show you just how unstealthy you really are I've busted bucks that my buddy standing next to me missed because he didn't hear them moving.

One of the buds stopped taking a charge long after warranty but when I mailed them back to Otto they sent me a new pair without hassle. I'll keep using them.
 

ElPollo

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
164
I use the Peltor Tactical 500 at the range. A little bulky but I really like them. Solid noise reduction with really clear sound. I don't use the bluetooth feature.

Hunting I wear the Otto Noizebarriers all day. Haven't had the battery run out on me yet and having the case able to recharge them is nice if I decide to do a few over-nights. The "up to 40 dB of impulse noise reduction" is up to some sort of debate with reality, whereas the "NRR: 28 dB(Foam Tips); 23 dB (3-Flange Tips)" that's in their spec sheet seems a bit more realistic. I use the foam tips and find it suitable enough for hunting with my 7 rem mag where I'm taking one shot (ok, maybe two...). I wouldn't rely on them at the range, and I don't. Why should I when I have better tools? I do like to have them on their louder setting when hunting. While there can be wind noise and crunchy footsteps that show you just how unstealthy you really are I've busted bucks that my buddy standing next to me missed because he didn't hear them moving.

One of the buds stopped taking a charge long after warranty but when I mailed them back to Otto they sent me a new pair without hassle. I'll keep using them.
That’s good info on the Ottos. Honestly a NRR of 28dB would good and on par with most muffs. Sometime it’s best to read the numbers and let your body evaluate them. I’m with you on not using the electronic plugs for long range sessions, but I don’t really need them for that unless I’m working with others.

In your opinion, how are the Ottos for tone and background noise reduction?
 
Top