Elk and bullet weight

hooker

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2012
Messages
210
Location
Nez Perce County
Have a sweet SS TC Firehawk . Believe it's a 1in 38 Twist. Been running a 295gr and 300gr bullet. But thinking of going lighter. Just looking to extend range without more powder and yet effectivly take down elk.

Thoughts?
 

philw

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
151
Location
Colorado
I would too, I use 348's and they're at the lower limit IMO. Only reason I asked about the scope is that if you can't use one and need to use open sights, most people are limited to ranges where a lighter bullet doesn't buy you anything in terms of flatter trajectory. Which is the only reason I can see for going lighter.
 

robby denning

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Staff member
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
10,127
Location
SE Idaho
philw is right. If you can't take advantage of magnifying scopes, you can't really take advantage of the lighter bullets. I tried by developing a load with a scope on and could shoot to 200+ yards with great accuracy (2-3" 3-shot groups) and mathematically had the energy I still needed.

When I pulled the scope off and put on a great peep, I couldn't get passed about 125 yards with great accuracy. Yes, I could throw lead into 10" circles beyond 150 but that is just not a good deal when you start shooting at live animals in real scenarios with no bench and adrenaline. I just resolved to get closer. Lord' willin' I'll have a muzz tag this year.
 

robby denning

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Feb 25, 2012
Messages
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SE Idaho
LNGBOWFLYER
Sorry, I didn't see that no one answered your post. From the Utah Game Regs Book, it doesn't say they aren't allowed (see bullet point 7), so I surmise they are allowed. Anyone else know for sure?

Muzzleloaders
Utah Code § 23-20-3 and Utah Admin. Rule R657-5-10
Muzzleloaders may be used during any big
game hunt—except the archery hunt. To hunt
big game with a muzzleloader, your muzzleloader
must meet all of the following requirements:
• It can be loaded only from the muzzle.
• It must have open sights, peep sights or a
fixed non-magnifying 1x scope.
• It can have only one barrel, and the barrel
must be at least 18 inches long.
• It cannot be capable of firing more than
once without being reloaded.
• The powder and bullet—or powder, sabot
and bullet—cannot be bonded together as
one unit for loading.
• It must be loaded with black powder or a
black powder substitute. The black powder
or black power substitute cannot contain
smokeless powder, but may contain some
nitrocellulose.
• To hunt big game, you must use a lead or
expanding bullet or projectile that’s at least
40 caliber in size.
• If you’re hunting deer or pronghorn, your
bullet must be 130 grains or heavier, or your
sabot must be 170 grains or heavier.
• If you’re hunting elk, moose, bison, bighorn
sheep or Rocky Mountain goats, you must
use a 210-grain or heavier bullet, or a sabot
bullet that’s at least 240 grains.
 
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