Elk teeth in the backcountry

WyoBowhunter21

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I have never taken the ivories out of an elk in the backcountry. So for those that only take a havalon how do you get the teeth out? Usually a solid blade works way better to "pop" them out.
 

shaun

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A good stick and a good size rock and you should be able to pop them out. I saw a guy do it with a stick and a hammer so I assume a good rock will also do the trick
 
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WyoBowhunter21

WyoBowhunter21

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I suppose a stick and rock makes sense. I tried cutting them out with my havalon this last season and it was a pain. I did wait a few days later to cut them out so it would have been ten times easier with a fresh kill!
 

fire arrow

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I have done a stick and rock for my last three bulls. No broken teeth. Saw the butcher do it once and that is where I learned how to do it.
 

justin davis

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Dumb question here, why take them? For aging?

No not for aging. I keep mine for good luck and good momento. A little treasure might have you. Like I keep turkey beards and spurs. And like you keep antlers.
 

cali_hornhunter

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Tehama County, CA
I can see why guys take the ivories out I did when I killed my ca bull cause I wanted too and it was too me a once in a lifetime hunt for here in cali hopefully in 2013 ill have some Idaho if Mother Nature decides not to burn like crazy lol
 

bobhunts

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I take them because they can be used to make good jewelry or as my brother did when we had a pair of custom rifles built he took one and had it put inside the button hole in the bolt. Kinda made the rifle one of a kind. Wish I had done the same at the time but I can always do it later. Never taken an elk with a rifle so I'll save that part until I do it with that rifle. All of my elk are taken with a bow. But I like the idea my brother came up with. Maybe when I get my first cow with a rifle tag I'll do the same. Another thought I came about is if I where to build a custom knife there are options with the ivories for stuff. Bob.
 

Manosteel

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I always take the Ivories. Native Americans from Canada and the States use them as jewellery or part of their traditional regalia for ceremonies. It was said that back in the old days anyone could hunt buffalo (way back when they numbered in the hundreds of thousands), even the women and older children helped, but it took a true hunter, what they called a "worthy man" to kill a moose or elk. Thus, “worthy men” would take the ivories, for their own use or as gifts, especial men trying to win the hand of new bride.

The most common use was, and still is to this day, earnings, for men and women. Nothing shouts “provider” more then a man that can feed his family off the land and that’s what the earnings on the most basic, non-spiritual, level represent. There is also a more spiritual reason but I am not the person to articulate that meaning.

Also I could be wrong but I read somewhere that elk are the only North American animals to produce ivory teeth. So keep them and wear them with pride as only a select few men (or women) have the skills and desire necessary to harvest such a noble animal.

Oh yeah, the stick and rock method works best in my experience.
 
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WyoBowhunter21

WyoBowhunter21

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I guess everyone is either cutting or using the stick and stone method. I take mine every single year for a keep sake. Someday I will make something out of them but as of right now I have a pile of them in a bag with different years on them.
 

Ross

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I always take them and have the prior years ivories on a pocket watch for good luck......you can never have enough luck from the Wapiti gods!
 

Chad44

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Castle rock, co
My grandfather had over 50 sets. He ran into hard times and got a lot of money for them. I wanna say he got $70 a set for the big ones.
 
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