First recurve recommendations

andydwyer

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Nov 11, 2019
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Michigan
What up fellas

I'm looking to get into shooting a recurve, and I'm looking for some recs to get into it without lightening the wallet too bad. It would be cool if one bow could carry me through a ways. The idea of a takedown bow is attractive to me for some reason.

Is a Sage Samick worth considering? What is gained in a premium bow?

Right now I shoot a 75lb 29.5" draw -- is a 50lb bow reasonable for me?

What factors should I be considering? Sorry if this question too broad or been answered too many times, but the amount of information out there is getting to me.
 

Mighty Mouse

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Jun 21, 2019
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Oklahoma
I took up shooting a recurve this spring after I drew a tag for a managed whitetail hunt that requires traditional archery equipment. I started with a Samick (now Galaxy) Sage with 35# limbs then graduated to 45#, which is what I'll be hunting with this fall. I shoot a 70# compound and was surprised at how difficult it was to draw a 35# recurve. The recurve's peak weight was only half as much, but the holding weight was 2.5 times greater. I would recommend starting light to avoid developing bad habits from being over-bowed. Some bow shops offer a limb swap program that allows you to gradually work up in draw weight without spending a lot on limbs. Even if you don't have such a program available to you, Sage limbs are pretty cheap and easy to resell.
 

Foggy Mountain

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Jun 19, 2021
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278
There’s a few ways to go. I’d personally not recommend the Chinese made stuff. It often skirts the Pittman Robertson funds and it gives more money to a country we don’t need to. . That being said a take down is one good idea as you can change limbs.
The next is the used market and simply keep trading as you need more weight.
My girl just decided to start shooting and we needed something super light. She’s tiny and a 30lb bear grizzly fit the bill. At her draw it’s real light. Pretty inexpensive but a one piece. Be advised with used bows the lighter the more expensive commonly. Soon as you get above 50-52lbs guys can’t sell em and they’re cheap so if you start moving up in weight not that I suggest it prematurely, but at that point sell the lighter bow and buy the heavier one. You’ll come out ahead.
Lots of trad only forums with classifieds. Be advised if you follow that route, use pay pal goods and services. You’d be protected that way. If you get screwed or damaged product you’re reimbursed fully. Pay pal friends and family you’re on your own.
As stated by Mighty Mouse stay light initially.
 

Foggy Mountain

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Jun 19, 2021
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278
I’m sorry had an afterthought I wanted to add. 4 years ago I had a brain tumor, all I wanted to do was shoot. Couldn’t draw any of my bows as my muscles weren’t working properly.
As a young man I was shooting a 75lb recurve and a 90lb compound. I’d powerlifted all my life and still lift, shot bows 50 years now, recently shooting recurves in the low 60s, compounds 70. I’d be more than capable I’d think.
No way to pull my lightest bows back so I got a 42lb widow used. Had copperhead limbs, pretty awesome looking. It took weeks before I could reach full draw. Eventually I did and started my climb up.
I say this as you might balk at spending decent money on a recurve. I understand but what does a very basic compound cost? Now add the accessories? Lots money.
So that recurve was kinda pricey, 800 bucks. Eventually I bought a Toelke whip, 45lb. Sold the PSA widow for what I paid, Traded the whip for a 48 pounder. You offer a trade for guys to go down they’ll do it.
Now I needed something heavier. I was about to start my trade thing. Noticed a 57lb Robertson Primal a year old. Sheep horn tips, bow bolt model. Price that. Expensive. Guy couldn’t draw it, couldn’t sell it. No market as it was too heavy for many. I offered 425 as w medical bills that’s all I had. He took it. I liked it so much I saw another, 52lb, only a month old. Bacote limbs. That one sat on a forum. I offered him 400, he took it no questions asked as he couldn’t draw it.
If you consider your switch an honest change and your first bow as an investment that’ll be worth lots more than a compound relatively quickly you’ll remove weight from your decision making. The 2 Robertson’s cost me what the light widow did. Food for thought.
One other point, if you buy a decent recurve used and decide to sell it as it’s not your thing, you’ll get same money back and lose nothing.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
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Location
Iowa
I wish I would have started on a Sage with 30# limbs. Sage limbs are stupid cheap and a lot of pro shops have an exchange program. I'd start at a low weight like 25# or 30#, learn good form, and move your way up to 50#. When you're done you'll have had plenty of time to research more expensive bows but will still have a trainer bow with light limbs that you can go back to when you want to work out small details in your form. Personally I think the best value in a hunting bow right now is the Samick Discovery ILF riser and Uukha Irbis limbs from https://www.alternativess.com . It comes out to like $800 and since it's ILF for another $80-100 you could buy a set of light limbs to learn on.

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Foggy Mountain

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Jun 19, 2021
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278
Tree stand athlete, best way to work out issues and practice form is on a string bow not a light bow, least not initially. we can discuss that at any time on another thread if you like.
Also can reprogram brain against target panic.

To the op, and I mean this only as a consideration. You haven’t said what it why you’re changing.
If it’s just to shoot a recurve and your mind is open, ILF could be an option as stated by treestandathlete.
There is no judgement or assumption here so I hope no one mixes my words, we never know what we don’t know and I don’t know why you’re switching or what you feel. If you were looking to enter the world of traditional Bowhunting and some of what it entails, I stress traditional to many anyhow as in older school, making strings, perhaps knapping tips, using cedar arrows, etc the ILF could make you feel like you haven’t gotten there. Imo not that you haven’t I just know I’d personally not be satisfied shooting one. You certainly may be and it’s surely an option
Just consider that though as well.
Myself I started 50 years back w a styk, I can only imagine if I started today that had I gotten an ILF I’d feel not right about that and maybe shortchanged. That’s only me but you need to be ok with whatever you do. We want your experience to be top notch
 
OP
andydwyer

andydwyer

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Nov 11, 2019
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158
Location
Michigan
Yeah, I'm definitely looking to hunt with it, but probably just goofing around for quite a while.

I wouldn't say that I'm planning on switching to traditional, but just adding another discipline. Plus, if I get some light limbs my wife and I can shoot together.

So, start with a 30lb sage?
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
68
Location
Iowa
Yeah, I'm definitely looking to hunt with it, but probably just goofing around for quite a while.

I wouldn't say that I'm planning on switching to traditional, but just adding another discipline. Plus, if I get some light limbs my wife and I can shoot together.

So, start with a 30lb sage?
For $150 what's the worst that could happen?!

If you're looking for form guidance and don't have someone physically near you to help out I'd suggest Tom Clum, Rod Jenkins, or even some of the NST system Olympic stuff on the interwebs. I know us hunters get a little grumpy when it comes to tournament archery but the international Olympic recurve community has turned a consistent and repeatable shot sequence into a literal science.

If you fall in love with it and decide to get more serious Tom Clum and Rod Jenkins both sell extensive online courses on "The Push"'s website. I've purchased Mr. Clums and it was easily worth the money. Best option if you can't find a coach locally.

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Seeknelk

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Jul 10, 2017
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NW MT
The ideal I think, is a metal ilf riser 19-21. Some good ones are Morrison Phoenix, trad tech titan, dallha, and many others actually.
Put trad tech black max wood glass 35-45# limbs on it and go play! Kinda nice how modular they are ...can play with different length limbs, different grip types( huge part of bow fit)! Types of limbs, longbow or recurve, high end , low end. Low to mid level ilf limbs will "outperform" most high end custom recurves. Rattle can the shiny ones if you want to.
Then , if you love shooting the single string bow and want to upgrade to a sweet custom rig, you know what to ask for, as far as grip and all that.
Can also pop an ilf bow apart and put it in pack in seconds.
For wood bows.
The sage bow also is a great starter. Also check out the black mesa bows and maddog customs for amazing prices for custom bows. And omega bows for some amazing performers at fair prices. Rocky mountain specialty gear has amazing selection of used bows on the website. Fun to browse once you know what you like.
 

bpctcb

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Oct 22, 2013
Messages
265
I started with a Galaxy Sage (Elite II) from Lancaster. I got 35 & 45# limbs. I got my form & anchor dialed in with the 35# and soon transferred those skills to the 45#. I will hunt with the 45# for elk in a few weeks. I would go this route again in a heartbeat. Money well spent.

I’ve avoided ILF so far because I do not want a metal riser. There are a few wood riser ILF options but not near as many as metal.

BP


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Arctic Hunter

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Aug 6, 2016
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I recommend you buy the masters of the bare bow set. Lots of good information on shooting styles. Rod Jenkins is probably the best form coach on there though, so you might also just take his class.

I shoot widows mostly. I would just buy a used one and forget the samick. I had one of those for a while too.

Ideally, go to a trad shoot and shoot all the bows you can. Find the grip you like or start watching the classifieds.
 

nphunter

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Jul 27, 2016
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Location
Oregon
The TBOW is a great and very inexpensive ILF bow, it isn't made in USA but the bow is practically identical to the Hoyt Satori. Buy it with lightweight limbs and once you get shooting figured out buy yourself a nice set of limbs for it and you will have an excellent bow.
 
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