Fitness for moose hunts.

AK Troutbum

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Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Messages
4,536
Location
Chugiak, Alaska
I wouldn’t over think it or over do it with your exercise regimen. Like what’s already been stated, it’s going to take multiple trips so there’s no reason in trying to excessively reduce the number and potentially injuring yourself. Just figure on packing out one quarter per trip, then neck meat, back straps, tenderloins in another trip, and cape and antlers in another trip or maybe even two trips for the cape and antlers (if you plan on doing a shoulder mount and depending on how big it is). It’s pretty surprising how heavy a wet/green moose cape can weigh. Your best bet is to let them come to you, via calling, etc., and don’t plan on hiking a long distance to find ‘em. I’m with the same mindset as Becca regarding never killing a moose very far away from my vehicle of transport.


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mcseal2

mcseal2

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May 8, 2014
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1,633
Thanks for the advice. I definitely want to let them come to me if at all possible. I'm definitely not figuring on trying to tackle more that a quarter in a trip, a bone in quarter will be heavier than I probably want in a load already. I just want to make sure I'm as capable of getting the load back without injury as possible. I'm going to do a skull mount also so the cape is a load I don't have to make. I just hope I get one down so I get to do all the hard work!
 

stevevan

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Joined
Mar 23, 2016
Messages
264
Book a hunt in Newfoundland. Last year I shot a big bull in the middle of nowhere. No problem, my guide called in a helicopter with a long line and in a matter of moments he was hooked up and the whole moose took a 20 minute flight back to the base camp. Much simpler than my Yukon bull that took 3 horses and a days ride through crappy conditions to get him out. Pack a bull out on your back. Not for me. I've put elk and mule deer on a pack frame and that was more than enough.
 

cnelk

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Joined
Mar 1, 2012
Messages
2,152
Location
N Colorado
If I were to do another AK moose hunt, to train for it Id take a 4'X4' piece of plywood, load it up with 80+lbs of sand bags, attached it to a pack frame, find a stream full of willows and start walking thru it wearing hip boots.

Do that for 8 hrs and see how you fair
 

Back Country Hunter 2

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Jul 8, 2015
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1,228
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Colorado
If I were to do another AK moose hunt, to train for it Id take a 4'X4' piece of plywood, load it up with 80+lbs of sand bags, attached it to a pack frame, find a stream full of willows and start walking thru it wearing hip boots.

Do that for 8 hrs and see how you fair
Haha! Love it!
 
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mcseal2

mcseal2

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May 8, 2014
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I think I'll have to be in Alaska with a big bull on the ground to embrace that kind of suffering. I figure I should train enough to survive it, not kill myself before the hunt. I might not want to go on the hunt if I tried that first, knowing what I'm getting into might not be a good thing!
 

rwmorgan48

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2019
Messages
20
My recommendation is to find a foam pit nearby. Now put on your pack and try walking through it while having somebody spray you with a hose and freezing water. You will also need another helper to whip you repeatedly with willows, paying special attention to your cold ears and face. Do this for a few hours daily and you will be all practiced up!
LMAO, thanks
 

TheGrayRider

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2018
Messages
93
Location
IN
Packing heavy military equipment in an Alice pack while serving in the US Army was great training for moose hunts. I surely enjoyed packing moose quarters over packing a heavy military radio or ammunition for am M60 machine gun. Its all good. Can’t wait to moose hunt again soon, TheGrayrider.
 

*zap*

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Dec 20, 2018
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Location
N/E Kansas
As far as training for this I like the incremental approach. Long distance with 35% body weight incrementally increased distance at a good consistent pace. heavy shorter rucks with up to 50-70% body weight for 10-15 minute sets with a rest between sets. Heavy basic posterior chain lifts with perfect form and incrementally add weight as you get stronger. I think 10% at a time for increases across the board works well after a week or two at set distances/weights. A tempo run once a week to round things out.

Coach Chris posted this and I think it is a good program which is where the suggestions I posted came from:

 

thinhorn_AK

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,158
Location
Alaska
My main focus this year was on moose, I did a ton of weighted jumprope, at least 30 mins a day along with a lot of kettlebell work and chin ups.
 

SaltySailor

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Messages
16
Location
Palmer, Alaska
I've handled a lot of moose in my life now, most of them we were able to get wheelers or other vehicles right up to, but the handful that I had to put on my back taught me a few things even after getting in 'good shape'.

1. Stamina is more important that strength. I once had a relative who came to help me pack a moose a mile through a swamp back to the wheelers. He was on the wrestling team, he also power lifted at the time. We put a hind quarter on his back and he made it maybe 400 yards before he gassed and asked for something lighter. I ended up getting both hinds out that moose.😩

2. Get the hinds out first! After processing the bull you are going to be whipped already, you will never be fresher than you are right at that moment, so get the hinds out. If something bad happens and you can't get the rest out, at least you got the biggest pieces of meat out, and all other trips will feel better compared to those.

3. A good pack frame makes all the difference in the world. You can be superman, but if your pack or pack frame sucks to wear its gonna be a real crappy day.

4. Rubber boots suck to pack moose in. I've done it, it sucks, i'm prone to rolling ankles. The last few times I knew I was going to put moose on my back, I put the good hiking boots on, got my feet wet, and praised the lord that I had them on instead of rubber boots during the pack out.

5. Mentally tough is more important than physically after the first load out😆. There is nothing more sobering than getting that first load to the wheeler or camp, feeling your shoulders rejoice after shedding the weight, then realize you have to do that 3 or more times. I've known guys who got the first load out then 'went to get help' or waited 'until tomorrow after they rest' because they didn't think they could do it. There are other critters out there that would love a moose feast for free, time is of the essence. Eat a snickers or take a snort of that Fireball whiskey, and get back in there.
 

Trial153

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2014
Messages
5,289
Location
NY
I've handled a lot of moose in my life now, most of them we were able to get wheelers or other vehicles right up to, but the handful that I had to put on my back taught me a few things even after getting in 'good shape'.

1. Stamina is more important that strength. I once had a relative who came to help me pack a moose a mile through a swamp back to the wheelers. He was on the wrestling team, he also power lifted at the time. We put a hind quarter on his back and he made it maybe 400 yards before he gassed and asked for something lighter. I ended up getting both hinds out that moose.

2. Get the hinds out first! After processing the bull you are going to be whipped already, you will never be fresher than you are right at that moment, so get the hinds out. If something bad happens and you can't get the rest out, at least you got the biggest pieces of meat out, and all other trips will feel better compared to those.

3. A good pack frame makes all the difference in the world. You can be superman, but if your pack or pack frame sucks to wear its gonna be a real crappy day.

4. Rubber boots suck to pack moose in. I've done it, it sucks, i'm prone to rolling ankles. The last few times I knew I was going to put moose on my back, I put the good hiking boots on, got my feet wet, and praised the lord that I had them on instead of rubber boots during the pack out.

5. Mentally tough is more important than physically after the first load out. There is nothing more sobering than getting that first load to the wheeler or camp, feeling your shoulders rejoice after shedding the weight, then realize you have to do that 3 or more times. I've known guys who got the first load out then 'went to get help' or waited 'until tomorrow after they rest' because they didn't think they could do it. There are other critters out there that would love a moose feast for free, time is of the essence. Eat a snickers or take a snort of that Fireball whiskey, and get back in there.
This guy gets it!^^
 
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mcseal2

mcseal2

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Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
1,633
We got both our moose out last year. We packed them to the raft and then floated them to camp. It came out to 8 heavy backpack loads and 2 raft loads. Neither of our packouts were over a half mile even the way we weaved around, but they were through very swampy terrain where we sank in every step pretty deep. There were boggy areas like walking on a giant submerged trampoline that you would sometimes break through. The further toward the middle of each one we got, the more it stretched and the deeper we sank. One boggy area we had to cross with my buddy's moose we used our frames like stretchers and each carried an end rather than have them strapped onto us. We figured that was much safer than having the load strapped onto us if we went under. Slow and steady wins the race once a moose hits the ground (or water)! Also each trip made the ground worse, it was better not to re-use the same path each trip.
 
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