Florida Wild Hog

BuckeyeBucks

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I’m planning on doing a wild pig hunt in Florida in April. I’ve heard of bears and pig having trichinosis. Is this something that is tested for in Florida or very prevalent. Should I have my pig tested if I shoot one? Does anyone have any experience with this. Sure don’t want me or my family contracting this.
 

coop22250

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It’s been fairly common in domestic pigs until the last few years, that’s the reason for cooking pork well done. It’s almost eradicated from most commercial farms now, due to controlled feed sources etc.

As long as you cook it well done, I think internal temp of 160, no worries. I always wear gloves when handling bears, although I’ve never heard of a case through handling, I might not get my hands clean enough before a snack or whatever.

I believe you can send in a tissue sample to various labs to have it tested, but Wild hog and bears I always assume it has it, cook it well, clean up well after handling it.


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freebird134

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Coop pretty much summed it up!

As far as I know it’s not very prevalent anywhere. However you should assume every wild pig is a Petri dish of disease. You can eat them for sure—just use caution and cook thoroughly.

I’m a biologist and one of our studies involves (literally) tons of dead wild pigs each year. A microbiologist colleague of mine has swabbed them and found every disease under the sun. Bad stuff. Like anthrax.

Gloves are very wise, and be sure to wash your hands well.


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BuckeyeBucks

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Coop pretty much summed it up!

As far as I know it’s not very prevalent anywhere. However you should assume every wild pig is a Petri dish of disease. You can eat them for sure—just use caution and cook thoroughly.

I’m a biologist and one of our studies involves (literally) tons of dead wild pigs each year. A microbiologist colleague of mine has swabbed them and found every disease under the sun. Bad stuff. Like anthrax.

Gloves are very wise, and be sure to wash your hands well.




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You guys are almost making me rethink if I should shoot and eat one. Sounds like they’re not worth the risk.
 

Bulldawg

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There isn’t hardly anymore risk eating wild pork than eating venison. Yeah you should probably wear gloves while gutting and skinning, and you have to cook it to 160 because it will more than likely have trichinosis. But the odds of you getting sick from it are so low that it shouldn’t even be considered.

You guys are almost making me rethink if I should shoot and eat one. Sounds like they’re not worth the risk.



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coop22250

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There is literally no more risk than the hogs USA has been eating in the market store from 40 years ago prior to industrial scale hog farms. Just cook them and you will be fine. I work in food safety, and there’s no wild game I won’t eat.


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kong

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Wild pugs in Hawaii supposedly have all the -osises, trichinosis, brucinosis, leptospirosis, etc. But smoke the meat in 1"x1"x whatever so length you like then fry it with onions. Tasty


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jspradley

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Trichinosis dies at around 140F, however EVERYTHING has to be at least that temperature so unless you're gonna sous vide it at that temp for a while then it's best to cook wild pork a little more done.

There's no risk so long as you take precautions and cook it enough. It's well worth it for that delicious feral piggie...
 
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