Florida Wild Hog

BuckeyeBucks

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Dec 18, 2018
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I’m planning on doing a wild pig hunt in Florida in April. I’ve heard of bears and pig having trichinosis. Is this something that is tested for in Florida or very prevalent. Should I have my pig tested if I shoot one? Does anyone have any experience with this. Sure don’t want me or my family contracting this.
 

coop22250

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Dec 19, 2016
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Palmer AK
It’s been fairly common in domestic pigs until the last few years, that’s the reason for cooking pork well done. It’s almost eradicated from most commercial farms now, due to controlled feed sources etc.

As long as you cook it well done, I think internal temp of 160, no worries. I always wear gloves when handling bears, although I’ve never heard of a case through handling, I might not get my hands clean enough before a snack or whatever.

I believe you can send in a tissue sample to various labs to have it tested, but Wild hog and bears I always assume it has it, cook it well, clean up well after handling it.


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freebird134

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Mar 13, 2012
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Coop pretty much summed it up!

As far as I know it’s not very prevalent anywhere. However you should assume every wild pig is a Petri dish of disease. You can eat them for sure—just use caution and cook thoroughly.

I’m a biologist and one of our studies involves (literally) tons of dead wild pigs each year. A microbiologist colleague of mine has swabbed them and found every disease under the sun. Bad stuff. Like anthrax.

Gloves are very wise, and be sure to wash your hands well.


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BuckeyeBucks

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Coop pretty much summed it up!

As far as I know it’s not very prevalent anywhere. However you should assume every wild pig is a Petri dish of disease. You can eat them for sure—just use caution and cook thoroughly.

I’m a biologist and one of our studies involves (literally) tons of dead wild pigs each year. A microbiologist colleague of mine has swabbed them and found every disease under the sun. Bad stuff. Like anthrax.

Gloves are very wise, and be sure to wash your hands well.




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You guys are almost making me rethink if I should shoot and eat one. Sounds like they’re not worth the risk.
 

Bulldawg

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Gunnison, CO
There isn’t hardly anymore risk eating wild pork than eating venison. Yeah you should probably wear gloves while gutting and skinning, and you have to cook it to 160 because it will more than likely have trichinosis. But the odds of you getting sick from it are so low that it shouldn’t even be considered.

You guys are almost making me rethink if I should shoot and eat one. Sounds like they’re not worth the risk.



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coop22250

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Palmer AK
There is literally no more risk than the hogs USA has been eating in the market store from 40 years ago prior to industrial scale hog farms. Just cook them and you will be fine. I work in food safety, and there’s no wild game I won’t eat.


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kong

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Nov 22, 2018
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Hawaii
Wild pugs in Hawaii supposedly have all the -osises, trichinosis, brucinosis, leptospirosis, etc. But smoke the meat in 1"x1"x whatever so length you like then fry it with onions. Tasty


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jspradley

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League City, TX
Trichinosis dies at around 140F, however EVERYTHING has to be at least that temperature so unless you're gonna sous vide it at that temp for a while then it's best to cook wild pork a little more done.

There's no risk so long as you take precautions and cook it enough. It's well worth it for that delicious feral piggie...
 

NUKE

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Mar 20, 2019
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Killed a few in an Orange grove outside of Daytona and they were awesome. Like domestic pork, cook all the way through well done. Much leaner meat. So, you’ll get there quicker and it’s easy to dry them out. So, I brined all the meat on my last ones and it was much better.
 

Boarmaster

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Apr 14, 2019
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Fort Myers , FL
I killed and ate hundreds of them. I wont keep one if it has any sort of sores or infection. When your skinning it keep and eye out for wounds and punctures that are infected. Hogs get bit by dogs and other hogs and those wounds can fester. Toss any hogs that have any festering.
For the most part they are safe to handle .
I wear rubber gloves.
Use the gutless method if possible.
After you kill one get it hung up , skinned and clean as soon as possible.
Pack the meat in ice.
Leave it in the ice water for a few days.
Enjoy your wild hog and don't be too worried about getting sick.
Use common sense.
 

TauPhi111

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Ohio
Trichinosis is pretty common among bears and pigs, and sometimes mountain lions and all kinds of other predators and omnivores. I wouldn't waste your money getting it tested unless you're set on eating some medium rare pork. If you shoot a mature pig it very likely has it. However, I've killed and eaten pigs in Florida and bears in PA and as long as you cook it as people have stated above, there is no risk. Both animals can be very tasty and tender when prepared properly. No eating a bear or pig or mountain lion because it has trichinosis is like not eating a piece of produce because there are bugs and dirt on it. Just handle it properly.
 

Shrek

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I ate wild hog from down the road today for lunch. Cook it done and don’t worry a bit. If it’s a stinking boar cut its nuts out right away. I eat wild hog all the time and so do all my friends and we’ve never had a problem. If you want good eating shoot the little 80-120 pound bbq pigs and pass on the big boars.
 

Shrek

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BuckeyeBucks , if they offer dog hunts for hogs and you’ve never done it I highly recommend it. It’s a blast ! Especially if they’re catching hog and cutting them. Run on in there amongst the catch dogs and a big boar and grab hold of a back foot ! Who’s got who !?
 

TauPhi111

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BuckeyeBucks , if they offer dog hunts for hogs and you’ve never done it I highly recommend it. It’s a blast ! Especially if they’re catching hog and cutting them. Run on in there amongst the catch dogs and a big boar and grab hold of a back foot ! Who’s got who !?
I will second that. Dog hunts are crazy. I ended up shooting mine but I would like to go back and shank one.
 

Shrek

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I will second that. Dog hunts are crazy. I ended up shooting mine but I would like to go back and shank one.
When I say cutting hogs I mean you catch the boars and cut their nuts off and let them go. That makes them grow fat and much better eating. It can get a bit exciting grabbing a hog by the back foot and turning him over.
 

Florida Bow Hunter

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May 3, 2019
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You guys are almost making me rethink if I should shoot and eat one. Sounds like they’re not worth the risk.
Don’t get overly paranoid. As was suggested, always glove up.

I cook my Florida wild boar in a pressure cooker. Not much can withstand that thing !!! Pressure cooker can turn the rankest stinking gamey boar hog into tasting like veal.

So glove up, rinse your pig, rinse your meat before putting it in your cooler on ice.

At home, clean properly and de-bone. When cooking , knock the fire outta any disease with from hell !


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