Fly-In - Camp Stove(s) Fuel Canister Restriction.. on a supercub?

AKBuckeye

Newbie
Joined
Mar 23, 2012
Messages
2
I'm two weeks from the coveted Tok, Sheep hunt. We just recently learned that my SolTi Jetboil stove (and many other UL stoves) has a restricted (in flight) fuel canister. The isobutane canisters are restricted on all flights - even a supercub! We are flying out with 40-mile air - and they just said its a big deal. 40-mile states they visually check the fuel source for stoves before each flight. I cant believe this popular fuel source is now banned for flights - even a supercub!

Is anyone else faced with this? I suppose its not an issue if your driving and walking in.. but WOW? This means I'm forced to buy a new white gas stove - which is heavier. This specific hunt has a (by 40-mile air) pack weight limit of 50 lbs max... this is scheduled to be a 14 day hunt (party tag). every ounce counts. This is a big weight issue.

HELP!!!
 

2rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,030
Location
Nor Cal
HMMM....Is this new? A 40 mile customer had video of using propane in 2010.
 
OP
A

AKBuckeye

Newbie
Joined
Mar 23, 2012
Messages
2
Apparently this went into effect last year but was not enforced by the smaller fly-in services. But over the winter pressure has mounted on them to where they are at risk of losing their licenses if they do not enforce this. This just sounds so strange? I'm going to give some hearsay here - forgive me if my facts are not exact as I need to check this - but each isobutane canister has a DOT# printed on it and it is that DOT# that restricts all air travel. I have been looking on-line for more info and it is quite low key - I would expect there to be outrage - or is it that this is really new? Unless you own your own plane - this effects A LOT OF US!!!
 

larryschwartz

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
1,099
Location
Annapolis, MD
this is an existing regulation that is now being enforced with a lot more vigor by the government, so the outfitters are between a rock and a hard place. I've seen this discussed in other places before. Two solutions come up to solve the problem, and both are based on going with something that doesn't use cans of compressed gas.

The first option, if you will be below treeline, is to get one of the lightweight stoves that burn sticks or other organic materials efficiently, like the caldera cones or the other new stoves that are often talked about. You will need to be able to pick up what you will burn on site but they are pretty efficient and there is no fuel to bring along. They are designed mainly for boiling water, which is probably what you are going to use it for anyway.

The second option is to use a stove that will burn some form of liquid fuel that is not stored in a compressed form, like the MSR Whisperlite or Dragonfly,they use a small tank of liquid fuel and have an integral pump that pressurizes it. They still make them and they work fine, just a little more mess than using a fuel cannister. A trick of the trade here is to get one that will burn aviation fuel and then just siphon a container out of the plane, with the pilots advance knowledge and approval, when you get to where he is taking you.

Hope this helps,

Larry
 

Yellowknife

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2012
Messages
1,672
Location
Fairbanks, Alaska
I have been looking on-line for more info and it is quite low key - I would expect there to be outrage - or is it that this is really new? Unless you own your own plane - this effects A LOT OF US!!!
Well... "A lot of us" might be a stretch. There aren't a huge number of hunters that do chartered fly out hunts, and many of those just expect their guide to take care of it.

That being said, I'm one of those that does do chartered flyout hunts. So far most the air taxis and helicopter companies I work with are "don't ask, don't tell", but it is an issue for some. Unfortunately, many of the hunt transporters are cracking down because they know that they are popular with their hunters.

In your case, I won't say it's really that big of deal anyway. An MSR Whisperlite and isn't THAT heavy and they are pretty good on fuel. Plus you wont' have to carry around all those little fuel canisters. A 14 day hunt with a 50 lb limit is certainly going to make you count oz, but I would guess the stove + fuel difference is less than a lb. Especially if you use one of the larger liquid fuel bottles. Stuff even MORE gear in your pockets for the flight :) It's only the stuff in the pack that counts.

Canister stoves are easy and convenient, and I love mine, but keep a whisperlite around for those times I need it. It's not like they suddenly became junk.

Yk

PS Did you know that between 40-50% of the weight in those Jetboil fuel canisters are steel? You don't burn much fuel, but you carry a bunch of metal per unit. On the other hand, a full 20 fl oz MSR bottle has only about 5 oz of metal, so you are carrying only about 20% of the weight in the container. Fuel is also significantly cheaper, which helps pay for the extra stove you are about to buy. :)
 

2rocky

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
1,030
Location
Nor Cal
YK, your words carry a lot of "weight" and I am storing that away for future reference.
 

Lawnboi

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
3,851
Location
North Central Wi
I use a liquid fuel stove over my canister stove from time to time. Still a good piece of gear that gets plenty of use, and it isnt THAT heavy. Just get it and learn how it works before you take it. Be sure not to light it by the walls of your shelter either ;) Some of them can be a little termpermental.

For that long of a trip i would also take an extra fuel pump, its an extra few ounces that will definetly be worth carrying if your not in an area where you can start a fire.

My liquid fuel stove of choice is the MSR dragonfly. I use it for winter and cold weather camping, and when i want to get a little fancy with my cooking.
 

mtnkid85

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
740
Location
Beartooth Mtns, MT
As has been stated, go ahead and get the MSR Whisperlite. It is a good stove, one that Ive used for several years. At one point in time I had run the calculations to determine when it becomes more effecient to carry a liquid stove with a large bottle over a cannister stove with extra cannisters... I dont remember at what point it became lighter, but I do remember that it did.
Two weeks is a lot of cooking, I wouldnt be surprised if youll wind up lighter.
 

hodgeman

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2012
Messages
1,061
Location
Delta Junction, AK
I've been contemplating making the switch to other fuels and this is just one more reason to do so.

The gas canister stove is very convenient in summer and early fall, but it's pitiful in cold weather. Last few years I've been using a Littlbug stove that burns wood on winter camping and ski trips- light and it burns just a double handful of twigs. It would be a good choice for someone going below treeline. No fuel to carry at all- couple of minutes under a spruce tree and you're set.

For alpine trips I'll likely switch to a whisperlite.
 

broncoformudv

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
186
Location
Anchorage, Alaska
This issue was talked about this winter on the Alaska Outdoor Forum, but just popped up again in there and now here. I guess some transporters didn't inform their clients when they scheduled their flights last winter/spring?

There are a lot of options out there for liquid fuel stoves with MSR being one of the most popular if not the most popular brands. Their Whisperlight and Dragonfly are their two most common models found around the world and are great stoves. Just be ready for the jet engine sound if you go with the Dragonfly. :)

A new er liquid fuel stove is the Soto Muka, this has been getting lots of great reviews, the main reason for that is you do not have to prime it before using it which is a little bit of a pain on standard liquid fuel stoves and can cause some concerns when using them in tents. Not that I have ever gotten carried away with the amount of fuel I use to prime mine. LOL.

http://www.backpacker.com/2011-editors-choice-snow-award-gear-review-soto-muka-liquid-fuel-stove/gear/16010

Good luck on your TOK tag! What strip are you flying into? I was in there last season as a sherpa for a good friend that nailed a real nice ram.
 
Top