Gear Choices for Idaho Hunt

87TT

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Mar 13, 2019
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Idaho
My EXO K2 3500 is way more comfortable than any of the gazillion day packs I have or have owned. And backpacked with. I have backpacked quite a bit over the years. Find one used on the classifieds even if you have to get a part time job.
 
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May 1, 2020
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OHIO
I did my first backpacking solo hunting trip last season so I was in the same boat as you. Focus more on the pack and boots and being in shape. I went with a mountain smith shelter lt for my shelter. Only $75 bucks on here. Do some research and figure out what gear you need, and look for it in the classifieds. It will save you a lot of money in the long run. If you’re looking into clothing, get merino wool base layers. They really are worth the money. Don’t worry so much about the camo aspect. I got a shot with my bow last year wearing wrangler outdoor khaki pants (recommend for $30) and a solid grey shirt.
 

Spence14

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Feb 2, 2019
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Virginia
I'll mirror what a lot of folks have said. If you are truly doing a back country trip, I would focus on the gear that gets you there and keeps you there. Splurge on boots and pack, then focus on tent, stove, sleeping bag setup. I'd say camo would be last. I personally do not skimp on clothing, but have friends that go with me every year that wear cheap camo and as long as they have the quality back pack gear previously mentioned, I never hear them complain too much about their clothing.
 

NJDiverDan

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Apr 3, 2014
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Rigby, Idaho
#1 would be boots, if you can find a pair that did not properly fit someone, ok, but better to buy new so they are broken in to your feet.

#2 watch the classified and find a good used pack. Kifaru, Stone Glacier, EXO, Mystery Ranch are all good, and in order of my preference but any would work well.

The other gear is really as needed. As someone else mentioned, next on my list would be a warm sleep system. If you don't sleep well, you will not last too long in the back country.

As other have said, guessing you are targeting 2022, which gives you plenty of time to get your gear.
 

sneaky

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Good boots, and a roll of Leukotape. Those should be first on your list. You've got a long time to piece together a good kit. Camo is the least of your worries.

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DANJR

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Joined
Dec 17, 2018
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20
Location
CO
Camo would be last on the purchase list. Really try and think about your hunting style and what you want to do. I am a gear head personally, but always try to find good gear on sale or used. Use what you have until then. Otherwise you dump a lot of money, all of which won't really help your success rates, but can make your experience more comfortable/enjoyable.

Good advice is spend the money on things between you and the ground: boots, sleeping pad, etc. This also holds true for car tires, etc. Pack can also make or break your hunt-hard to spend the coin, and any pack will do UNTIL you're hauling out an animal. Then its worth every penny to have a good pack. Generally, if you're outdoorsy at all, you probably already have some decent clothing. Good clothing for outdoor activities like hiking etc. is good clothing for hunting-the activities are the same. This is especially true for mild archery season time of year. Camo is a nice to have, not a must.

Looking back, if I'd have spent as much time e-scouting and doing research on the animals I'm hunting and how they move through the area as I did on gear and shopping for gear, I'd probably be a heck of a lot more successful.
 

Marble

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May 29, 2019
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1,244
If your poor you have to be tougher.

Your biggest and most important piece of gear is your mental fitness.


Most of us have been really successful with just the bare necessities and great that eureka but may be not the best.

Listen to the advice here but don't go crazy. Its taken me 20 years to get to where I don't need to buy a bunch of stuff every year.

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Marble

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May 29, 2019
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Even if you don't go until 2022, you can get stuff together and go on back packing practice runs. It's very helpful to get your entire system down. Keep notes, store your stuff in organization totes, clean it after each trip. Most of the better stuff will last a very long time.

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PaBone

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Aug 1, 2016
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17
Location
Western Pa.
I'm following, my two son and I drew general elk combo tags for Montana. Plan on being in Montana September 8th. I have most most of my gear ready and doing lots of hiking in my new Miendl boots. Still messing with different insoles because the stock cork ones are to hard for me.
 

Wassid82

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Joined
Dec 4, 2018
Messages
403
I would worry less about camp. Just about anything can work. As clothing goes you'll want lots of different layers for Idaho. It can be 70 or it can be 10. layering is key. Packs can be found used and save some money. Get something that can be a load hauler. MR/Kifaru/Kuiu/Exo would be my recommendation. I've had others that work too. Find a good deal. for shelter tent/tipi is definitely the way to go. I've done hammock and they work but in winter storms your not feeling great. I would make sure I had good glass to use. Boots are very important. But each person thinks different boots work better/worse. find a pair that are comfortable for you. You'll likely hike a lot....sore feet kill a hunt. And gators. I wear them almost year round anymore. They are money
 

fmyth

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Mar 14, 2019
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867
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Arizona
I’m looking to get a new pack. Current one won’t work.

I’ll be archery hunting in early to mid September.

I can get an older backpacking tent (a little heavier like 7 pounds), have a 20 degree bag, thermorest mattress pad, multiple backpacking stoves, cooking gear, paracord, gutting/boning knife set, and good base layers.

I appreciate the help @fatlander and will add your items to the list.
Mountainsmith Mountain Shelter 2lbs $129. https://www.backcountry.com/mountai...gifpHGHLU9nP5hhJpR8Uw5f9Jx9-dpbAaAsTAEALw_wcB
 

BamuleyID

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Apr 21, 2021
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Idaho
No one has mentioned a bivy setup...? I know it's not the most comfortable way to sleep but certainly a cheaper option and much much lighter than any tent you could dream of. Pair it with a cord and tarp and you are almost guaranteed a weatherproof shelter. Plus it adds warmth to your sleep system. Condensation is really the only downfall in my opinion. But, with a non-high end bivy, you can get crafty with gear mods and add more ventilation if you have a down bag and are concerned with wetting out. My 2 cents but such an easy way to drop weight and save money. Your budget extends to the pack and boots!
Also, you are looking at some steep country and a bivy can get you more mobile and into camp spots more easily if you are into that kind of thing.
 
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Gary4248

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Apr 11, 2021
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No one has mentioned a bivy setup...? I know it's not the most comfortable way to sleep but certainly a cheaper option and much much lighter than any tent you could dream of. Pair it with a cord and tarp and you are almost guaranteed a weatherproof shelter. Plus it adds warmth to your sleep system. Condensation is really the only downfall in my opinion. But, with a non-high end bivy, you can get crafty with gear mods and add more ventilation if you have a down bag and are concerned with wetting out. My 2 cents but such an easy way to drop weight and save money. Your budget extends to the pack and boots!
Also, you are looking at some steep country and a bivy can get you more mobile and into camp spots more easily if you are into that kind of thing.
I was definitely contemplating a bivy. I’m torn now between a base camp of sorts and the bivy option. The base camp at least allows me to keep my gear somewhere dry at all times.
 

brn2hnt

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Feb 27, 2012
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254
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Treasure Valley, ID
@Gary4248 your unit choices make this a very difficult question to answer.

Units like 22 there's not a single place that requires packing in vs camping at your truck. Units like 48 are the complete opposite, and that's just 2 examples.

If you're backpacking, adjust unit choices accordingly. If you're set on some of those units, adjust gear choices accordingly. Early September car camping, a walmart coleman tent is fine and waaaay easier on the budget.
 

Craw3773

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Messages
25
If you go the bicycle route, I really like the USGI 3 piece system. It's heavy, but customizable, and still way light than a bad and a tent.

I've also woken up toasty want in one, and had the ice buildup from freezing rain Crack off the outside of it.

Just don't let water pool between your legs
 

Marble

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May 29, 2019
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What's the weight savings difference for using a bivy? I've never even hunted with someone that uses them. I've always used a small tent of some kind.

The tent I use is a 3 man and it weighs 2.5 pounds.

Probably some space savings as well.

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sneaky

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I've got a DCF Patrol tarp duo from MLD that weighs 13oz with heavier guy lines attached. Way more room than a bivy and much better in bad weather to ride out weather. I pair that with a 6oz EE recon bivy and it's about as light as it gets and still be covered. DCF is expensive but it's the real deal when it comes to not stretching and staying put where you set it.

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BamuleyID

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Apr 21, 2021
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Idaho
What's the weight savings difference for using a bivy? I've never even hunted with someone that uses them. I've always used a small tent of some kind.

The tent I use is a 3 man and it weighs 2.5 pounds.

Probably some space savings as well.

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Plan on saving at least a pound with a bivy. Often more than that. My bivy setup weighs just over 1lb with a tarp and cord if weatherproofing is needed more than what is offered with the bivy alone. As Sneaky stated though, the spare wiggle room in a bivy does not exist. If you feel confined with a mummy bag, then compound that with a bivy. Comfort loss over weight savings for some. Probably why you don't see many bivy users roaming around. I honestly don't use one all the time unless is going to be a long trek and I want to haul in extra snacks.
 
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