Gear essentials for a newbie

Alec McDonald10

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2019
Messages
11
Hey guys me and a buddy of mine have got the bug. We have talked about it for a few years, and now that the kids are older we are planning on taking our first trip out west next year. Besides guns and optics which we already have what are the must haves for the hunt/enjoyment out there (thinking Colorado right now) We would love to be the lucky rookies but are being realistic and understand that the first years will more than likely be more of learning than killing. We both have kids so we are trying to be smart about what we buy and want to start with the essentials. I have already learned a lot from other peoples post in my 18 hours here. Thanks in advance for any help!
I would say first and foremost, taking care of your feet. Crispi or kentrek boots are worth the money though they seem expensive. Another essential in my mind would be a good shelter system like either a wall tent or a backpack lightweight Kifaru type set up. Other than that I would say some sort of water filtration system and a good pack like an exo. There is many different little things that will take you years to get the “perfect list” but that’s part of the experience! Have fun and good luck.
 

trouthunter1106

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2013
Messages
192
Make sure all the gear fundamentals are checked off the list. I wouldn’t spend to much time or money on your initial kit as it will change over time. Maps, google earth, podcasts about scouting and behavior, and information . Show up with a plan A, B, and C.
 

Sealee12

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2018
Messages
65
Location
PA
rent what you can - especially if you can rent a wall tent and stove that could save big $$$. All the other advise in this thread - boots, fitness, etc is 100% on the money
 

mike464

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2019
Messages
16
Location
Montana
Put at least 20 feet of paracord, a lightweight tarp, and firestarter in your pack in case you get stuck out overnight.
 

Sealee12

Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2018
Messages
65
Location
PA
Also - have a fully planned backup scenario worked out just in case. One year, my buddy’s “secret hell hole canyon that won’t have another Hunter in it” was overrun in rifle season. We had a plan B worked up so we only lost 1 day. Ended up tagging out later in the week!after a 10 mile move to our alternate drainage.
 

Smarpin

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
14
As far as boots are concerned is a good pack/mountaineering boot going to be the best route to go? How much insulation do you want in a boot that you’ll be actively hiking in?
 

THunt

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
13
As far as boots are concerned is a good pack/mountaineering boot going to be the best route to go? How much insulation do you want in a boot that you’ll be actively hiking in?
I run an uninsulated 8 inch Lowa Tibet GTX and make up the difference with my sock selection. Its definitely a personal preference though. You might get cold feet, or sit longer, etc
 

Smarpin

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
14
I run an uninsulated 8 inch Lowa Tibet GTX and make up the difference with my sock selection. Its definitely a personal preference though. You might get cold feet, or sit longer, etc
I’ve got a pair of salomon 4d gtx that I really like for tough hikes, but they aren’t insulated and just didn’t know if it would be beneficial to invest in another pair or invest in socks (which are obviously cheaper)
 

THunt

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
13
I’ve got a pair of salomon 4d gtx that I really like for tough hikes, but they aren’t insulated and just didn’t know if it would be beneficial to invest in another pair or invest in socks (which are obviously cheaper)
The Tibet is a heavy duty all leather boot that's comparable to the Kenetrek and Crispi. I run them with gaiters in snow/ wet conditions which helps with the warmth factor too. I'm not familiar with the Salomon boots.
 

Smarpin

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
14
The Tibet is a heavy duty all leather boot that's comparable to the Kenetrek and Crispi. I run them with gaiters in snow/ wet conditions which helps with the warmth factor too. I'm not familiar with the Salomon boots.
They are definitely a lighter book, maybe I should look in to a heavier duty pair
 
OP
W

WillB25

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2019
Messages
25
That’s one question I had as well do you go insulated or uninsulated
 

Clarence

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2018
Messages
131
I would get you're sleep system dialed in this winter. Trying it in the backyard on a cold night, and having something not work out is much easier to contend with, than a day or 2 into a 8 day hunt. Spend more on your boots than you ever thought you would. Get familiar with on x maps or a GPS. This will give you more confidence. Well maintained feet, a full stomach when you go to bed, and a decent night's sleep will keep you on the mountain.
My .02

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

Clarence

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2018
Messages
131
When you spend stupid money on your new boots, yank the insoles out, throw them in the trash, and spend another 50 or 60 bucks on some good insoles. I love my Lowa boots, but those, and most I have heard come with poor insoles in my opinion.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

Michael54

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2019
Messages
349
The main ones are be able to walk (boots) see(optics) shoot (a gun) and be able to stay warm and dry or get warm and dry quickly if you get cold and wet. (Tent, clothes, sleep system). If any of those fail your hunt is ending early or going south fast.
 

THunt

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
13
They are definitely a lighter book, maybe I should look in to a heavier duty pair
You'll have to decide based on your personal preferences. I ran a $200 Cabelas boot for a few years, but under heavy loads and on steep terrain, they weren't supportive enough. I ended up with foot pain/strains that gave me trouble all of last year. This season I went up in boot quality (price) and will never go back. That said, the old boots worked fine for a lot of hunting situations, but the combination of steep, rocky terrain and heavy loads in my elk area necessitated a change.
 
OP
W

WillB25

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2019
Messages
25
You'll have to decide based on your personal preferences. I ran a $200 Cabelas boot for a few years, but under heavy loads and on steep terrain, they weren't supportive enough. I ended up with foot pain/strains that gave me trouble all of last year. This season I went up in boot quality (price) and will never go back. That said, the old boots worked fine for a lot of hunting situations, but the combination of steep, rocky terrain and heavy loads in my elk area necessitated a change.
Just curious what did you go with?
 

THunt

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
13
Just curious what did you go with?
Lowa Tibet high. I tried Kenetrek, Crispi, Zamberlan, and at least a few others. I wear Lowa at work and they just "fit". And I put Superfeet insoles in them. Try all the boots you can get your hands on now, pick the ones that fit you, and spend the rest of the year breaking them in.
 

THunt

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
13
Lowa Tibet high. I tried Kenetrek, Crispi, Zamberlan, and at least a few others. I wear Lowa at work and they just "fit". And I put Superfeet insoles in them. Try all the boots you can get your hands on now, pick the ones that fit you, and spend the rest of the year breaking them in.
And these types of boots will probably feel a little like ski boots on flat easy ground. For instance, when walking logging roads for blacktails, they were too stiff, but on the steep nasty, they really proved their worth.
 
Top