Going from 30-06 to 308?

SDHNTR

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If you cut that barrel on the ‘06, start researching a load that has a fast powder.




Traditional ‘06 loads out of 22” barrels are loaded with slow burning powders. Creating a lot of waste in energy in even a 22” barrel. Be ready for a severe muzzle flash in a 20” barreled version. You can mitigate that with a faster powder. However, you’ll never eliminate due to the heavier bullets the cartridge shines at.



If I were going to a more streamlined lighter package, I’d just buy a 18” barreled 308. For the ranges you are going to shoot, it’ll do great. I’m speaking from the experience of doing just this recently. And, after doing so I’d never shorten the barrel on an ‘06 if buying a compact 308 was an option.


A lot of people say the calibers are basically the same. They aren’t. The ‘06 is so much more capable. And, you don’t see that until you get the 24” barrels. But, you don’t need that. So, keep the gun you have and buy the compact 308. You’ll be glad you did.
Listen to this! If you chop a barrel on a 30-06, you are likely going to be wasting a lot of unburned powder out the end of the muzzle. You just built yourself an excessively loud flame thrower. Short barrels = .308. End of story. Much more complete and efficient powder burn.
 

SDHNTR

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The 3006 is faster than the 308win at all barrel lengths given the same bullet. It's not at just 24" and if we're using the correct powder there is no point where there are increasing losses vs the 308's same losses.
What you are missing is they aren’t the same losses. The .308 will lose much less per inch of barrel than the 30-06. For an 18” bbl, the 308 is a no brainer. I’d hunt anything in the lower 48 out to 600+ with mine, with zero reservations.
 

WV Mountaineer

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Based upon the early feedback. I thought I’d forget the 308 and hunt with the 30-06 and if I wanted it shorter, I’d cut the barrel. Then the most recent posts came in from guys saying how much they like their 308s, especially the shorter, handier ones and it piqued my interest enough to call some of my local shops to see what the cost would be for my desired rifle. Then I called several some local gunsmiths to see what the the turnaround time would be to cut the barrel.

The lead times helped force my decision for this season. The lead times are too long between the rifle coming in and then waiting for it to be cut in order for my hunt next month.

Long story short, I’m sticking with the 30-06 this season. Thanks for all the input and advice!
It’s not going to be the popular choice here. But, something you need to consider. I’m a gun guy. A gun nut so to speak. So, I’m not a frugal guy that found a compromise. I was completely ready to drop thousands of dollars on my latest rifle purchase. A true custom rig for myself.

I researched a lot. I made some choices. And was prepared to have my choices built in a rifle I intend to use on mountain hunts. Here in Appalachia where I might cover 10 miles a day. Packing gear and deer is the way I rifle hunt. So, this gun was going to be my baby. My dream fulfilled.


Then I handled an American Ruger 308 compact. I was blown away. So, I decided to hold up and research, research, and research this gun. I decided to buy it due to its affordability. $425 is still money. But, in the gun world it isn’t on the radar when you are considering a ground up build. Anyways, Deciding even if the reviews on the gun were incorrect, I wasn’t going to be out anything, I bought the rifle.

What I found was I built a gun with that cheap Ruger, that is everything I’ve ever wanted. Plus, ACCURATE!! Same hole kinda accuracy. With multiple loads. Factory and hand loads.

I’ve got $1200 in the whole setup. I’ve got a gun that is way better then moa accuracy. With every load I’ve ever shot through it. I load the bullet to fit the clip and it spits all of them with superb accuracy. No lands consideration is needed. It weighs 7 pounds loaded with a 165 magazine. It’s compact. And I’m not going to loose sleep over using it. It’s going to get wear marks. I’ll not abuse it but, I’m going to sure use it. And, it’s great to not have to worry about it.

However, the real beauty in going this route is the way the gun feels, Carries, and balances. It’s just a light, compact, extremely accurate hunting rifle. It’s not going to win any beauty contests. It’s not going to be the gun the kids and grandkids hope they get. But, it is going to be the gun that gets the most use.

Think about it. Put your hands on one. I put a 2x7x33 leupold scooe on mine. It’s Not top of the line primo glass. Just really good glass. And as good as glass made for light transmission. No need in killing the ergonomics with a bigger scope. And, at the ranges your gun will be used to kill stuff at, you won’t be able to optically see the advantages of the absolute best glass. So, save the scope money for the gunsmith.

Send the gun to your local smith and get him to go over the bedding blocks, the barrel channel if nessecary, etc…. In other words, do the tiny things that mass production skips out on. To completely ensures the gun is pin point accurate.


The smith I used charged me $140 for that service. Well worth it in my book. And way cheaper then any other mass produced gun he’s done the same for. He told me it’s a testimony to how well the cheap Ruger guns are built for accuracy.

Like I said earlier, it’s not the pretty, silky smooth gun we’d love to hunt hard for our lifetimes. It’s a tool. A very functional and capable tool. One that’s loved for function. Not for the looks.


I’ve said a lot on this post and thread. . Because I’m that passionate about and familiar with your situation. It might not be the best fit for you. But, it’s certainly worth your consideration. Good luck and God Bless.
 

HandgunHTR

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Listen to this! If you chop a barrel on a 30-06, you are likely going to be wasting a lot of unburned powder out the end of the muzzle. You just built yourself an excessively loud flame thrower. Short barrels = .308. End of story. Much more complete and efficient powder burn.

What you are missing is they aren’t the same losses. The .308 will lose much less per inch of barrel than the 30-06. For an 18” bbl, the 308 is a no brainer. I’d hunt anything in the lower 48 out to 600+ with mine, with zero reservations.

You may think that, but it actually isn't true. All of the powder is burned up very quickly, regardless of cartridge or barrel length. What you are actually giving up is time for the pressure created from the "explosion" of the powder burning to act on the bullet. Mathematically, the amount of momentum imparted to an object is equal to the area under the force vs. time curve. So, longer the force is applied, the more momentum is applied. We see this in the form of velocity.
Most people equate muzzle blast with "unburned powder" or some such. It is simply the fact that more powder burned creates more gases, which in turn need more volume to disperse into. For a fixed volume (such as a .30 caliber barrel of a given length) if you have more gases, you are going to have more muzzle blast. You are also going to have more pressure, which means more force acting on the bullet and therefore more velocity. However, as Charlie Sisk found in his testing (https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/17630469/1). The amount of barrel length doesn't have as much of an affect on velocity as many people think.
From a physics standpoint, what Charlie was "proving" is that most of the force imparted to a bullet in a barrel is done so in the first few inches. As the barrel gets longer, that force imparted becomes less and less.

All that being said, given the OPs parameters in his original post, I honestly doubt he would see any appreciable difference in a 20" 30-06 or a 20" 308.
 

SDHNTR

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You may think that, but it actually isn't true. All of the powder is burned up very quickly, regardless of cartridge or barrel length. What you are actually giving up is time for the pressure created from the "explosion" of the powder burning to act on the bullet. Mathematically, the amount of momentum imparted to an object is equal to the area under the force vs. time curve. So, longer the force is applied, the more momentum is applied. We see this in the form of velocity.
Most people equate muzzle blast with "unburned powder" or some such. It is simply the fact that more powder burned creates more gases, which in turn need more volume to disperse into. For a fixed volume (such as a .30 caliber barrel of a given length) if you have more gases, you are going to have more muzzle blast. You are also going to have more pressure, which means more force acting on the bullet and therefore more velocity. However, as Charlie Sisk found in his testing (https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/17630469/1). The amount of barrel length doesn't have as much of an affect on velocity as many people think.
From a physics standpoint, what Charlie was "proving" is that most of the force imparted to a bullet in a barrel is done so in the first few inches. As the barrel gets longer, that force imparted becomes less and less.

All that being said, given the OPs parameters in his original post, I honestly doubt he would see any appreciable difference in a 20" 30-06 or a 20" 308.
Like many things, there are academic arguments, and then there are real results in the field. Call it gas or unburned powder or whatever you want, there’s more blast out the end of a short barreled 30-06. Given a choice between a short barreled .308 vs a 30-06, I’m taking a 308 all day, any day.
 
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Loper

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It’s not going to be the popular choice here. But, something you need to consider. I’m a gun guy. A gun nut so to speak. So, I’m not a frugal guy that found a compromise. I was completely ready to drop thousands of dollars on my latest rifle purchase. A true custom rig for myself.

I researched a lot. I made some choices. And was prepared to have my choices built in a rifle I intend to use on mountain hunts. Here in Appalachia where I might cover 10 miles a day. Packing gear and deer is the way I rifle hunt. So, this gun was going to be my baby. My dream fulfilled.


Then I handled an American Ruger 308 compact. I was blown away. So, I decided to hold up and research, research, and research this gun. I decided to buy it due to its affordability. $425 is still money. But, in the gun world it isn’t on the radar when you are considering a ground up build. Anyways, Deciding even if the reviews on the gun were incorrect, I wasn’t going to be out anything, I bought the rifle.

What I found was I built a gun with that cheap Ruger, that is everything I’ve ever wanted. Plus, ACCURATE!! Same hole kinda accuracy. With multiple loads. Factory and hand loads.

I’ve got $1200 in the whole setup. I’ve got a gun that is way better then moa accuracy. With every load I’ve ever shot through it. I load the bullet to fit the clip and it spits all of them with superb accuracy. No lands consideration is needed. It weighs 7 pounds loaded with a 165 magazine. It’s compact. And I’m not going to loose sleep over using it. It’s going to get wear marks. I’ll not abuse it but, I’m going to sure use it. And, it’s great to not have to worry about it.

However, the real beauty in going this route is the way the gun feels, Carries, and balances. It’s just a light, compact, extremely accurate hunting rifle. It’s not going to win any beauty contests. It’s not going to be the gun the kids and grandkids hope they get. But, it is going to be the gun that gets the most use.

Think about it. Put your hands on one. I put a 2x7x33 leupold scooe on mine. It’s Not top of the line primo glass. Just really good glass. And as good as glass made for light transmission. No need in killing the ergonomics with a bigger scope. And, at the ranges your gun will be used to kill stuff at, you won’t be able to optically see the advantages of the absolute best glass. So, save the scope money for the gunsmith.

Send the gun to your local smith and get him to go over the bedding blocks, the barrel channel if nessecary, etc…. In other words, do the tiny things that mass production skips out on. To completely ensures the gun is pin point accurate.


The smith I used charged me $140 for that service. Well worth it in my book. And way cheaper then any other mass produced gun he’s done the same for. He told me it’s a testimony to how well the cheap Ruger guns are built for accuracy.

Like I said earlier, it’s not the pretty, silky smooth gun we’d love to hunt hard for our lifetimes. It’s a tool. A very functional and capable tool. One that’s loved for function. Not for the looks.


I’ve said a lot on this post and thread. . Because I’m that passionate about and familiar with your situation. It might not be the best fit for you. But, it’s certainly worth your consideration. Good luck and God Bless.

I’m glad you mentioned this.

I’m not sure if this is a surprise or not, but a compact Ruger American was exactly what I’ve been considering.

I’ve had a Remington 700 and a Browning A-Bolt (both in 30-06) and while I like the Browning more than the 700, I don’t love it. I also have a Ruger American Predator in 6.5 CM which I actually like more than the other two brands. Some of the reasons I like it is much of the same reasons you mention, it’s very accurate, it’s inexpensive, and if I bang it up, I’m not crying over it. Some people bad mouth the American for not being a smooth enough action or having a zipper sound when cycling, or just being a “cheap” rifle. However, after a few hundred rounds my action is much smoother and it no longer has that sound.

My thought was to get a .308 with the standard barrel profile for weight purposes and chop the barrel since the compacts are no longer made in left hand. With the 12 ounce 2-10 scope I have it can be under 7 lbs and pretty handy which I think would be just about an ideal utilitarian gun for me.

I guess if I really wanted to I could just chop the barrel of the 6.5 CM, but I’m not sure I want to do that.
 

HandgunHTR

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Like many things, there are academic arguments, and then there are real results in the field. Call it gas or unburned powder or whatever you want, there’s more blast out the end of a short barreled 30-06. Given a choice between a short barreled .308 vs a 30-06, I’m taking a 308 all day, any day.

Understand, but remember, the OP plans on suppressing the rifle, so muzzle blast becomes a moot point.

As a suppressed hunter that has used an 18" 308 for whitetails, axis, blackbuck, and black bear, I fully agree with the assessment that a short barreled 308 will do anything that the OP wants it to do.
But, as a person who also has short barreled rifles in long-action chamberings and is currently building a 20" 300 Win Mag for use as a back-up moose rifle, I also know that having some extra momentum gives me the ability to shoot heavier bullets faster, which means I can stretch my shots or chase bigger animals.
Again, if I was not shooting suppressed, there is no way in Hades I would contemplate doing this, but suppressors have changed the game when it comes to shooting bigger chamberings out of shorter barrels.
 

SDHNTR

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Understand, but remember, the OP plans on suppressing the rifle, so muzzle blast becomes a moot point.

As a suppressed hunter that has used an 18" 308 for whitetails, axis, blackbuck, and black bear, I fully agree with the assessment that a short barreled 308 will do anything that the OP wants it to do.
But, as a person who also has short barreled rifles in long-action chamberings and is currently building a 20" 300 Win Mag for use as a back-up moose rifle, I also know that having some extra momentum gives me the ability to shoot heavier bullets faster, which means I can stretch my shots or chase bigger animals.
Again, if I was not shooting suppressed, there is no way in Hades I would contemplate doing this, but suppressors have changed the game when it comes to shooting bigger chamberings out of shorter barrels.
Valid point. I have zero experience with suppressors.
 

2-Stix

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my mountain rifle for heavy timber, high elevation climbs, deer, bear and elk is a light weight 308.

for antelope and mule deer I use a 7RM both tikka with leupold CDS scopes.
 

WV Mountaineer

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Listen to this! If you chop a barrel on a 30-06, you are likely going to be wasting a lot of unburned powder out the end of the muzzle. You just built yourself an excessively loud flame thrower. Short barrels = .308. End of story. Much more complete and efficient powder burn.
You may think that, but it actually isn't true. All of the powder is burned up very quickly, regardless of cartridge or barrel length. What you are actually giving up is time for the pressure created from the "explosion" of the powder burning to act on the bullet. Mathematically, the amount of momentum imparted to an object is equal to the area under the force vs. time curve. So, longer the force is applied, the more momentum is applied. We see this in the form of velocity.
Most people equate muzzle blast with "unburned powder" or some such. It is simply the fact that more powder burned creates more gases, which in turn need more volume to disperse into. For a fixed volume (such as a .30 caliber barrel of a given length) if you have more gases, you are going to have more muzzle blast. You are also going to have more pressure, which means more force acting on the bullet and therefore more velocity. However, as Charlie Sisk found in his testing (https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/17630469/1). The amount of barrel length doesn't have as much of an affect on velocity as many people think.
From a physics standpoint, what Charlie was "proving" is that most of the force imparted to a bullet in a barrel is done so in the first few inches. As the barrel gets longer, that force imparted becomes less and less.

All that being said, given the OPs parameters in his original post, I honestly doubt he would see any appreciable difference in a 20" 30-06 or a 20" 308.
You ever shot a factory loaded 20” barreled ‘06 and .308? I’m not being a wise guy but, I’ll answer it for you. No you haven’t. Your opinion and explanation says so.


Call it what you want. I call it muzzle blast because it looks like a flame thrower coming out of a 20” barreled 30/06. It looks like a really big flame thrower out of an 18” barreled ‘06. While barely visible out of an 18” barreled 308. With factory and slow burning reloading powder.



Like I said, I’m not arguing, or insinuating your academic explanation is stupid. I’m just telling you what I’ve seen firsthand owning and shooting the rifles in discussion. In the configurations they are being considered.
 

WV Mountaineer

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I’m glad you mentioned this.

I’m not sure if this is a surprise or not, but a compact Ruger American was exactly what I’ve been considering.

I’ve had a Remington 700 and a Browning A-Bolt (both in 30-06) and while I like the Browning more than the 700, I don’t love it. I also have a Ruger American Predator in 6.5 CM which I actually like more than the other two brands. Some of the reasons I like it is much of the same reasons you mention, it’s very accurate, it’s inexpensive, and if I bang it up, I’m not crying over it. Some people bad mouth the American for not being a smooth enough action or having a zipper sound when cycling, or just being a “cheap” rifle. However, after a few hundred rounds my action is much smoother and it no longer has that sound.

My thought was to get a .308 with the standard barrel profile for weight purposes and chop the barrel since the compacts are no longer made in left hand. With the 12 ounce 2-10 scope I have it can be under 7 lbs and pretty handy which I think would be just about an ideal utilitarian gun for me.

I guess if I really wanted to I could just chop the barrel of the 6.5 CM, but I’m not sure I want to do that.
I think your consideration is spot on after being there and done it.

I’ve got guns that are incredibly beautiful and function perfectly. And, While I much prefer the 700’s I have over any A bolt, it’s because they are all customized to fit my desires. LOP, stocks, bedding blocks, action beddings, barrel channel work, triggers, etc…. All are superbly accurate. But, it took a lot more money to get them that way then it did the cheap Ruger.

I’ve come to a time that a lot of those guns are going to be in the hands of young ones. Heirlooms they’ll hunt and kill way more with then I will going forward. So, I built this one. And, I couldn’t be happier.
 

Lawnboi

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You ever shot a factory loaded 20” barreled ‘06 and .308? I’m not being a wise guy but, I’ll answer it for you. No you haven’t. Your opinion and explanation says so.


Call it what you want. I call it muzzle blast because it looks like a flame thrower coming out of a 20” barreled 30/06. It looks like a really big flame thrower out of an 18” barreled ‘06. While barely visible out of an 18” barreled 308. With factory and slow burning reloading powder.



Like I said, I’m not arguing, or insinuating your academic explanation is stupid. I’m just telling you what I’ve seen firsthand owning and shooting the rifles in discussion. In the configurations they are being considered.
Having owned a 20” 06, a 20” 308 and a 20” 300 WSM. I sort of agree with the guy above. The only thing I could tell the difference was on the 300.

I don’t see how a 308 is even an argument for the OP. I can think of a thousand other things I’d rather have than a 308 having a 3006 in my safe.

Generally the hunting public makes mountains out of mole hills and buys 10 different guns, with a few boxes of ammo for each when 4 guns and a mountain of ammo makes for a better rifleman.
 

HandgunHTR

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You ever shot a factory loaded 20” barreled ‘06 and .308? I’m not being a wise guy but, I’ll answer it for you. No you haven’t. Your opinion and explanation says so.


Call it what you want. I call it muzzle blast because it looks like a flame thrower coming out of a 20” barreled 30/06. It looks like a really big flame thrower out of an 18” barreled ‘06. While barely visible out of an 18” barreled 308. With factory and slow burning reloading powder.



Like I said, I’m not arguing, or insinuating your academic explanation is stupid. I’m just telling you what I’ve seen firsthand owning and shooting the rifles in discussion. In the configurations they are being considered.

Actually, I have shot short barreled 308s, 30-06, 270, 7-08, 45-70 and a few more. As you might imply from my screenname, I have spent most of my adult life hunting with handguns. What that means in practicality is that I have multiple TC Encores and Contenders.

So, I own, and have shot a 15" 308, and a 15" 30-06 side-by-side. The 30-06 did have more muzzle blast. I never suggested otherwise. The post that I quoted stated "unburned powder" is what causes muzzle blast. I just pointed out that it is the increased gases created due to a larger powder charge in the same internal barrel volume that causes the muzzle blast. The 15" 270 and 14" 45-70 also had a significant amount of muzzle blast. That being said, the velocities achieved in those barrels were not significantly lower than those achieved in a standard rifle. Not enough for me to give up hunting with them. They did everything I needed them to do. They also contributed quite a bit to my hearing loss, which is what ultimately drove me back to rifle hunting using short-action or even mini action chamberings (7-08, 6.8 SPC, and 6.5 Grendel mostly) and finally to the point where I am now which is suppressed.

Once I started shooting suppressed, it re-opened the door for me to compact shooting with heavier bullets and higher velocities.

So, in the interest of "turnabout is fair play", how much experience do you have shooting short barreled rifles with a suppressor attached? Because, as I pointed out above, the OP is planning on suppressing the rifle, so muzzle blast is a moot point.
 

WV Mountaineer

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Actually, I have shot short barreled 308s, 30-06, 270, 7-08, 45-70 and a few more. As you might imply from my screenname, I have spent most of my adult life hunting with handguns. What that means in practicality is that I have multiple TC Encores and Contenders.

So, I own, and have shot a 15" 308, and a 15" 30-06 side-by-side. The 30-06 did have more muzzle blast. I never suggested otherwise. The post that I quoted stated "unburned powder" is what causes muzzle blast. I just pointed out that it is the increased gases created due to a larger powder charge in the same internal barrel volume that causes the muzzle blast. The 15" 270 and 14" 45-70 also had a significant amount of muzzle blast. That being said, the velocities achieved in those barrels were not significantly lower than those achieved in a standard rifle. Not enough for me to give up hunting with them. They did everything I needed them to do. They also contributed quite a bit to my hearing loss, which is what ultimately drove me back to rifle hunting using short-action or even mini action chamberings (7-08, 6.8 SPC, and 6.5 Grendel mostly) and finally to the point where I am now which is suppressed.

Once I started shooting suppressed, it re-opened the door for me to compact shooting with heavier bullets and higher velocities.

So, in the interest of "turnabout is fair play", how much experience do you have shooting short barreled rifles with a suppressor attached? Because, as I pointed out above, the OP is planning on suppressing the rifle, so muzzle blast is a moot point.
I didn’t even read it all. However, All the explanation wasn’t needed. I summarized you’d cone back with that angle. Once again, you can safely summerize that my beliefs on the scientific theory matters not a lot to me. Meaning, I’ll take what I see and describe in a manner that common dialogue pertaining to the topic of muzzle blast, is discussed among peers that share this hobbie.

I’ve shot a few suppressed guns. From 16 inch carbined rifles, pistols, and no longs of full length barrels. I don’t proclaim to have any interest in the subject. But, I can talk to anyone in the world about muzzle blast and they understand what I’m saying.


My point had zero consideration of a suppressed short barrel of any caliber. You got me there because it wasn’t the point of the discussion of my rant. Which is likely the difference of opinion. But, I’m not going to apologize for doing it. Because it helped the OP.
 

Trackselk

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To the OP. You haven't lived until you've carried a 6 pound rifle. My kimber MA is all in, even including the sling at 6 lbs, and that provides full length barrel velocity (23"?) It's a joy to carry and terrible to shoot offhand, but off my knee, I've taken 2 elk at 350 yards. Now, thanks to modern bullets and balistic evidence posted on this site, I'm trying to build a 5lb (ish) 6.5 CM, which has more energy beyond 400 yards, and shoots flatter than the .308. The pound of weight loss will give me about the same recoil. I wouldn't want to shoot a 5 pound .308, as i'm scrawny... so, in my estimation you already have the 06 replacement if you have a 6.5. Guys are effectively slaying elk at 900 yards with the 6.5... I've decided that my personal limit with a feather light rifle is 500 yards, if the stars align and I have an excellent rest.

* I don't know anything about suppressors.
 

z987k

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To the OP. You haven't lived until you've carried a 6 pound rifle. My kimber MA is all in, even including the sling at 6 lbs, and that provides full length barrel velocity (23"?) It's a joy to carry and terrible to shoot offhand, but off my knee, I've taken 2 elk at 350 yards. Now, thanks to modern bullets and balistic evidence posted on this site, I'm trying to build a 5lb (ish) 6.5 CM, which has more energy beyond 400 yards, and shoots flatter than the .308. The pound of weight loss will give me about the same recoil. I wouldn't want to shoot a 5 pound .308, as i'm scrawny... so, in my estimation you already have the 06 replacement if you have a 6.5. Guys are effectively slaying elk at 900 yards with the 6.5... I've decided that my personal limit with a feather light rifle is 500 yards, if the stars align and I have an excellent rest.

* I don't know anything about suppressors.
Put a 5-6 in titanium suppressor on it for an extra 5oz or so and you can go bigger than a 6.5cm and still be able to shoot such a light rifle.
 

Trackselk

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Put a 5-6 in titanium suppressor on it for an extra 5oz or so and you can go bigger than a 6.5cm and still be able to shoot such a light rifle.
Wow, I had no idea that suppressors ALSO reduced recoil! You got me thinking, so I googled it. Oh no, down another rabbit hole I go, I think i'm going to end up with the worlds most money wasted on a kimber hunter when this is finished! Wait a second, the .308's are lighter than the 6.5CM due to larger bore(?), now I've gotta go decide if the 500 yard b&c reticle shots make me as happy as the 6.5CM. It never ends...
Anyone looking for a 6.5CM hunter? Lol
 

z987k

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Wow, I had no idea that suppressors ALSO reduced recoil! You got me thinking, so I googled it. Oh no, down another rabbit hole I go, I think i'm going to end up with the worlds most money wasted on a kimber hunter when this is finished! Wait a second, the .308's are lighter than the 6.5CM due to larger bore(?), now I've gotta go decide if the 500 yard b&c reticle shots make me as happy as the 6.5CM. It never ends...
Anyone looking for a 6.5CM hunter? Lol
Split the difference on a 7mm-08! Better BC, still save that 1oz or so in bore material haha.

You can get a kimber hunter pretty dang light!
 

thinhorn_AK

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Wow, I had no idea that suppressors ALSO reduced recoil! You got me thinking, so I googled it. Oh no, down another rabbit hole I go, I think i'm going to end up with the worlds most money wasted on a kimber hunter when this is finished! Wait a second, the .308's are lighter than the 6.5CM due to larger bore(?), now I've gotta go decide if the 500 yard b&c reticle shots make me as happy as the 6.5CM. It never ends...
Anyone looking for a 6.5CM hunter? Lol
I have a Kimber Montana 308 with an 18” barrel. With the silencer it’s about like shooting a 22 in mouth sound and recoil.
 

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