Gong advice

BuckSnort

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
835
Location
Central CA
Wife and I are wanting to stretch our rifles out and practice out to 800 yards or so (this is LONG range for use as we are newbies as far as shooting past 400... Anyway I was thinking about having some gongs set out at 500, 600 and maybe 800 yards and was wondering what size targets I should get ?
 

JollyRoger

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Messages
515
Location
SW Idaho
I’ve been using a 10” gong and a full size steel IPSC (18x30”) target for shooting at distance. For me, I found the slightly larger target helped me understand some things at distance easier. Much easier to see patterns emerging that helped better dial in my ballistic apps.

That said smacking that 10” plate is a ton of fun when you’re all dialed in.


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cmahoney

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
229
Location
Minden Nevada
I really like having my 24” gong at 500-1000 especially when other people shoot with me. It helps when you are off on a wind call you can see your impacts. I use a 10” on a single fence post for a lot of shooting out to 500.


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ntrlbrnhunter

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
21
I agree with ^^^^...go big, I went 10” out to a thousand at my range and really wish I would have went bigger and am now buying more plate... bigger is better imo especially on those windy days or when shooting alone and like stated above you can always paint a smaller “target” area on gong (y)
 

vermeire

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2017
Messages
27
Buy large, you can always paint a smaller target on them. That way you can learn form all hits rather than, "where dd that one go?"
Living "back East" I've only shot farther than 200 yards a few times and reading this was an 'ah-ha' moment for me. I recently came across some steels on eBay and realized how economical they have become. I was thinking about getting a 3" to use at my home club at 200 yards. I figured 1.5 MOA should be good but being able to judge "misses" should prove very useful.
 

davsco

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Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
300
Location
VA
yeah bigger is better so more chance of hitting the target vs off in the berm somewhere you can't see and thus don't know if you missed left, right, high or low. but we have to remember that 24" steel is way bigger than a deer or elk vital zone. so maybe a 24" plate at 800-1000yds but then a 8-10" circle next to it to see if you're really dialed in.
 

cmahoney

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
229
Location
Minden Nevada
yeah bigger is better so more chance of hitting the target vs off in the berm somewhere you can't see and thus don't know if you missed left, right, high or low. but we have to remember that 24" steel is way bigger than a deer or elk vital zone. so maybe a 24" plate at 800-1000yds but then a 8-10" circle next to it to see if you're really dialed in.
I paint my 24” gong white with a black circle in the center so you can see where your hits are easily. I use that construction marking paint, which seems to work the best.


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BuckSnort

BuckSnort

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
835
Location
Central CA
I tend toward bigger plates, because many beginners shoot here. I go 6"round at a 100 to 12" round at 400, a 12x16 at 500, 18"x18" from 600-1000 and 30" squares at 1250, 1500 and a mile. I paint with orange marking paint because white sucks in the snow......





Dang! thats a hell of a range setup!
 
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