Good life advice

TexanSam

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Messages
186
Hey guys, one thing I have noticed on here is that there seems to be a wealth of successful people on these forums. Not to generalize y'all into any kind of group or anything, but I figured it might be a good idea to start a thread for those of y'all with more life experience, who are like minded in sharing similar desires (Western hunting), to share some things y'all would like to say to a young 20 something year old lame duck college senior who is still trying to figure out what is going to keep the lights on in a few months.

Seriously, swing away! There's never a bad learning experience in my opinion, and I always wonder what it is that the successful crowd would share with the younger version of themselves if they could.
 

backcountry_hunter

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
760
Put your head down and go to work.... whatever field that might be in. Honestly the American dream has never been easier to obtain. Never be "too good" or "too educated" for any job. If you're humble and keep a good head on your shoulders with a moderately decent work ethic, you'll find a good paying job and keep it.

I have the unfortunate pleasure of hiring a fair amount of people. I don't expect anyone to kill themselves for me, just an honest 8 hours work for the same in pay... It's amazing how many (not just kids but adults too) people can't stand the thought of manual labor. Most of our day revolves around running a chainsaw and cleaning up trees, it can be hot, rainy, or cold (dependning on time of year) and there's still people drawing unemployment that are "above" what we do in their minds. I compensate them well for the area and there's opportunity to grow and move up within the business. I still have a tough time hanging on to people.

At first I though it was me but I have some entrepreneurial buddies in larger metro areas. They're paying in the neighborhood of $70-$80k a year for laborers in a few different companies... they're having a horrible time finding people to stick around. It's outside manual work but they're compensated handsomely. Pride get's in the way of alot of advantages in life....
 

Whaledriver

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Messages
325
Location
Colorado
Find something you love to do. I can say in twenty years I have never dreaded going to work. Be careful chasing the dollar, as it may leave you unhappy. Dont' be afraid to take chances at your age. You do not want to wake up someday and say "what if?". Good luck
 

woods89

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Messages
338
Location
Southern MO Ozarks
I'm not going to call myself successful, but our little construction business pays the bills and then some. Here are some of my observations.

Don't be afraid to start at the bottom of your chosen field and work up. The best leaders and supervisors are almost always people who have paid their dues. Trust me, if you do your entry level job to a high level of competance, someone will take notice.

Be persistant. I see a lot of guys skipping around from job to job. Sometimes you have to make a change but whether it's a different house, vehicle, or job change almost always costs you money.

You make your self much more valuble when your employer knows that you will be there in the morning, or you will give him a call as soon as possible if an emergency arises.

Like hunting, doing a job well requires executing the small things well. Learn your trade or occupation inside and out.

I know, nothing revolutionary here, but the bar is pretty low these days. Just know that success doesn't happen overnight.

As a parting thought, my dad told us many times that the definition of success is

1 A meaningful relationship with your Creator.
2 The love and respect of your family.
3 Work that is meaningful and a benefit to society
 

Jauwater

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
1,644
I wouldn't consider myself wealthy by no means. But I was once where you are, and here is my short story.

I grew up in a two bedroom trailer with 5 siblings. If I ever had a family I knew I didn't want my kids or wife struggling the way we did growing up. Within three years of graduating higg school I opened my own business. Selling real estate, and working for about 30 different banks doing audit inspections. At 22, I was married, had a nice piece of property, 2 brand new cars, and money in the bank. Everybody in my life was happy except me. I was miserable working my life away just to make a dollar. The recession hit, and I lost everything including my wife within a year. Over the next few years I struggled finding a decent paying job within construction. Working 50-60hr weeks, wrecking my body, just trying to keep my life style together. Still miserable. Finally decided to start working at something I enjoy. I started a plumbing business with my brother, and also started working as door to door salesman. I've downsized everything in my life dramatically, but I spend more then half my time doing what I want, and being there for the people in my life rather then being gone all the time. I lost the woman I loved because I was there for her monetarily, but unattached emotionally. Mainly due to work. I've since started a new relationship, and find it to be much more rewarding, and fulfilling then past relationships. And I believe it's because I made the change in my life to make the kind of money I need to support a family, but also have the time to be there for them at any given moment. I'm not saying I'm super happy at the work I do, but right now more then ever I feel wealthy/stable. Sometimes people can feel stuck, and never make a change. That alone can be detrimental to success. I wanted to tell that story because my advice is never settle if your not where you wanna be. Everyone has a different happy place, and I recommend never settling until you find yourself there. You gotta make money, that is a given. But in the in between time when your working towards your "success", similar to what I'm doing now, work a job you can stand so you don't get burnt out. Good luck.

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5MilesBack

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Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
10,513
Location
Colorado Springs
I've had people ask me if I'm the way I am because of the military, and I always reply......"No, I was military because of who I am". I'm sure the military isn't for everyone, but if I had sons instead of daughters I'd be pushing them that direction.......especially if you're almost done with college. I'd look into the officer programs and move forward. Yes, it might cramp your hunting time a bit, but if you look at it more from a long term perspective.......it will provide even better opportunities and time for hunting later on. 20 years will go real fast, especially in a fast-paced environment.

Other advice.......always put in 100%, nothing worthwhile is obtained from slacking. Never burn a bridge......you never know when you might need to use said bridge in the future. Keep your options open, and take advantage of the ones that come your way. Start investing immediately if you aren't already. I started in high school and let me tell you......it is unreal what even a little money can turn into over time.
 

robby denning

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Feb 25, 2012
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10,306
Location
SE Idaho
Stay out of debt, buy used trucks (and really anything that makes sense to buy used) and start your retirement savings now, even if you can only give a little....and put the Lord first.
 

freebird134

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2012
Messages
504
Stay out of debt, buy used trucks (and really anything that makes sense to buy used) and start your retirement savings now, even if you can only give a little....and put the Lord first.

That's solid advice. Debt is huge!

I'm an atheist, so I'd tweak the last part and say "remember that money isn't everything, so put what's important to you first." Success is measured in many ways. It's easy to get caught up in money and material things (e.g., gear) especially on a site like this. Going to sleep with a clear conscience, knowing you are doing your best for yourself, your family, society, and the environment, ranks pretty damn high on my list for success.
 

5MilesBack

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Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
10,513
Location
Colorado Springs
start your retirement savings now, even if you can only give a little....and put the Lord first.

It's funny.......many years ago just starting out, money of course was tight like it is for so many. Looking at my budget and living in San Diego, tithing made absolutely no sense at all.......on the books. But I started giving his 10% first, and not even sure how.......but I suddenly had more money than I needed. Still hard to comprehend from a financial sense, but it absolutely works. I even had more money to invest, and the more I gave......the more I had. Still works today.
 

robby denning

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SE Idaho
Yip 5miles, He can do more with my 90% than I could ever do with the the whole 100% left to my own selfish short-sighted ways


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elkduds

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Joined
Jun 22, 2016
Messages
956
Location
CO Springs
@ 20 your loaf isn't done baking. Embrace change, be about change, because you and the world are changing every day. The better you are @ riding change and maybe getting ahead of it. the more you will prosper. Practice feeling excitement, joy, contentment during whatever you pursue for a career. Negativity, sadness, resentment can become a lifelong habit, so resist those as a daily practice. Feed your passions, whether hunting, faith, friendships, work. Some will endure, others will evolve. Lighten up while you still can...
 

Squirrels

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Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
1,016
robby and 5miles hit it on the head in my opinion. put the LORD first and EVERYTHING and I mean EVERYTHING else will manage to work out. The further you put Him in front the better you will be. Will it always be a bed of roses, no. But my favorite book promises no such thing, it does however promise He will be there with me through it all.

The fact that you asked for advice on such matters speaks volumes for you character and humbleness.
 

Molon Labe

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Feb 17, 2017
Messages
433
Work as hard as you can now. Try to get a couple jobs and invest as much money as you can.
That is the one thing I regret from my early 20s. I only worked one job and played too much.
You can easily work 70-80 hours a week and still have a full day a week to have fun when you are single.
Once you get married and if you have a family you will want to spend as much time with them as possible.

Stay away from TV it is an absolute waste of time. You need to be efficient at this point in your life.
Make sure to maximize your days: work, eating, socializing, outdoors...and stay away from unproductive activities.

You can't be an eagle during the day and an owl at night.

Take risks when they are appropriate and present themselves. And give any opportunity due process...
I own a business now that is amazing, fun, flexible and have a wonderful staff.
The first time I looked at it I did a hard pass because I was happy working for someone else...good thing I reconsidered.
By pumping up your investments when you are young you will have the assets to make moves when you are in your 30s.

Don't be afraid of debt. But be very afraid of debt on depreciating assets.
Debt is a tool to leverage your current assets to create revenue.
Be frugal and consider every purchase before you make it.

When you do spend money make sure it is spent on something that is important to you.
My hunting boots cost more than the car I drive. My binos cost more than the truck I drive.

Set a big goal. Then chase that goal for all you are worth.

Be honest with yourself. Make sure that you self reflect and play to your strengths and not your weaknesses.

I feel like I could go on and on for days on this...hopefully you will pick something up from this thread
 

ericF

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
511
Location
CO
Adding into the money portion, Pay yourself first. You've probably heard that before, but take it to heart. Assuming you are going the employee route versus the business owner route, as soon as you get your first real job Immediately setup 10-15% to automatically go into a 401k or Roth and NEVER TOUCH IT. If you start doing this as soon as you get your real first job, you will never miss the money, but compounding interest is an amazing thing.

Also along those lines, never stop investing in your education. It doesn't have to be formal education, but whenever you start working, learn everything you can. It is ok to specialize in something but breadth of knowledge is just as important as depth of knowledge.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2015
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Eau Claire, Wi.
Be honest, keep a good attitude and be a positive person people like to be around. Enjoy your work and chase your dreams . if you enjoy hunting do it (within your financial means). Life is short, you realize that when you get older. Enjoy Life.
 

Grumman

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Joined
Jan 30, 2016
Messages
1,010
Location
LA, Lower Alabama
If they are still alive be sure to take time to stay in touch with your grandparents often. Your 20's and early career can keep you busy and give you lots of reasons to not stay in touch like your earlier years. I just lost my Grandpa and came to realize that the hard way.


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vanish

Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
534
Location
Colorado
Work as hard as you can now. Try to get a couple jobs and invest as much money as you can.
That is the one thing I regret from my early 20s. I only worked one job and played too much.
You can easily work 70-80 hours a week and still have a full day a week to have fun when you are single.
Once you get married and if you have a family you will want to spend as much time with them as possible.

I don't disagree with much that was said, but I find this very questionable. Live your life while you can, because you never know when things are going to change.
 
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