Hey Buddy... Are You Lost?

magtech

Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
96
Location
Michigan
Compass... dont use one. Sun rises and sets everyday. Its never not done this. Thats the only compass I need. If I'm in the mountains I've already mapped the mountain and roads mentally so I don't need a paper map. If I'm that lost ill just climb a ridge and spot a road and go from there...

Seriously, is this supposed to be hard?
 

Lionhound1975

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
215
Location
Virginia
I would give myself a solid 2, I've had formal training and then used it a lot for years. I feel much more comfortable with a good map and compass than I do trying to sort through the menu on a GPS using little arrow buttons. I jus got OnX Hunt last year, it is cool to play with but I have had electronics crap out before so I like having a paper map along for the ride.

GPS can lose their signal, I spent some time in triple canopy jungle in South America where you cannot get a signal on a hand held GPS. The Garmins with an external antenna did a little better than units like the Oregon with no external antenna. But sometimes the canopy was just too thick and none of the GPS we had worked. But a compass and map can be hard to use in thick forest too with no recognizable landmarks or creeks where you have to use dead reckoning.

If you use are going to use a compass, I think it wise to get a good one like a Silva, Brunton, or Suunto. I have seen the cheap Walmart compasses freeze, crack, develop air bubbles, and needles lose their charge. The best compass I have ever used is a German made K&R baseplate compass with sighting mirror. The dial plastic has a little give to it so it won't crack or freeze like some of the rigid plastic dials. I like baseplate compasses more than lensatic since its a lot easier to adjust for declination and you don't have to carry some protractor around if you want to triangulate your position.

Another overlooked way to avoid getting lost it to improve your tracking skills so you can always backtrack your own trail out of the woods if you get turned around.
 

Elkfitness

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
1,393
Location
Colorado
I’d put myself as a solid 2. Hunted for many years with just a map and compass. I have a gps now but still love the paper maps and always have them and use them.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Wetwork

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Eastern Orreeegon
I'd say I'm a 2....Spent more years in the service before they invented GPS than after it was. I "liked" exactly one post so far in this thread, and the person mentioned fog. Fog is right up there with night to me. If you can't nav in the dark or fog without GPS than you are hunting areas you've hunted for years. Where I hunt in the fall, the clouds drop sometimes and you can't see ten yards. Rather than hug a tree or get deeper in the suck, I've learned to make sure its no problem. Other than the hunt is really over if you can't see ten yards. Cant pick out topography in the fog or dark. All you have is time...how far you walked over a certain amount of time. If you didn't mark exactly when you left...LOL.

New ground...with fog/night you are just wanting to spend a night or two on the hill roughing it. Met a guy off the trail in the fog who was pretty upset his GPS battery died.

New country, I get out get my old school compass out and get a heading. Set a way point on my GPS and my phone and start walking. Me personally...generally I hunt a hour in and a hour back. A hour in I shoot a reciprocal course back to my starting point. Then I dig out my gps and click my watch to take me home. I know if I walk my reciprocal course for a hour I should be back to camp/pickup. A few hundred yards off I should still be fine.

What got me once was which switch back road I'd parked off? Left the rig, and crossed a bunch of switch backs that all looked the same. Came time to come back to the rig and had lost my pickup. Passed it going down hill and had to hike back up to it. I hate that.

I'm lazy I hunt uphill, and walk back to camp or pickup downhill. -WW
 

OutHeavy

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2020
Messages
23
Location
Altamont, CA
2, although I"m still struggling to find the downside of getting lost in the elk woods. It takes all of 30 minutes on that drive home before i start wishing I was back in it again. it can't be so bad if you keep going back.
 
Top