Hot Tent Batoning Knife

Magnum61

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Apr 27, 2016
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PNW Native forced to California
I have a "Breecher". These were designed to open car doors if you needed to. It just happens that the blade acts like an ax head and splits really easily on big wood and clears brush while holding an edge. I know it's overkill but it just flat works very easily

Solid guy that makes them. Retired SWAT. He's open to any and all ideas. Watch the car door being pealed open for entertainment.

 

rclouse79

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Dec 10, 2019
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From the couple youtube video knife reviews I've watched, batoning seems to be a "cool thing to do" with a knife. The only reason I'm considering it is we had a decent amount of trouble getting the fire going well last year at the beginning of MT rifle season - 3' of snow overnight and 20 below. Seemed to take forever to get the stove going with snow caked rounds. Had some suggest batoning to make things easier.
Worth a shot I suppose.
 
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treillw

treillw

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I just want to get the fire roaring and go to sleep asap. Also be able to bring it back to life at 3am when it is essentially out.
 

*zap*

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Trust me, try a brush ax and you will use that whenever possible....a very handy tool.

IMG_5623.JPG
 

Lionhound1975

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Aug 25, 2019
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Virginia
I don't know how a plastic wedge would work out but I would not want to try doing it inside a tipi with a stove. For me a small folding Balco Laplander saw and a fixed blade like an ESEE 6 is a lot faster and safer for splitting wet wood up to 4 inches thick for a stove inside a shelter than swinging a hatchet at a piece of wet or icy wood. I get that some people don't like the idea of batoning with a knife and to each their own. But for me it makes a big difference when wood is really wet and I need to get at the dry wood inside to get burning. If I need to split a lot of wood then I will bring an axe, not a hatchet, but I don't carry a full-size axe with me a lot. A saw is much quicker to cut wood to length than a hatchet and a a knife is safer to baton that wood with especially inside a shelter with other people/stove.
 

Marbles

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So reality check here... one of these plastic felling wedges probably weighs a few ounces. I'd think it's lighter than a knife. Definitely cheaper. Would you be able to pound one of these though a log with another log to "baton"?

I guess there might be a lot more resistance trying to drive the plastic through vs a sharp knife.


Don't think it will work at all. The plastic will deform and break. Their use in felling is to be placed in a saw cut.

Batoning wood always seemed like an activity for people who are bored and are looking for an excuse to use their knife for an ill suited task. If you are not interested in earning your bushcraft merit badge, I would either saw smaller diameter wood that does not need to be split or bring a hatchet. If the act of splitting wood with a knife lowers your blood pressure, I wish luck in your quest.

It gets you to dry wood that burns better, and in wet environments it is difficult to start a fire without splitting wood. A split round will burn better than an unsplit one. Batoning small stugg (1-2 inches in diameter) is what I normally do. Splitting logs by batoning is not really productive, though I will split small bits off of logs with it.
 
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treillw

treillw

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I called Benchmade. The sales rep said that the Leuku is a bushcrafting/survival knife and batoning falls within it's intended use.

I said that some people say batoning is hard on a knife. If something were to break with it, would it be replaced under warranty? She said no. If the tip were to break off, it could be resharpened and fixed. If the entire blade broke, it would be $50 to get it replaced.

I suppose that's not the end of the world, but if batoning falls within the intended use of the knife and it breaks during that activity, you would hope they would stand behind it.
 

sndmn11

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I would want a saber or convex grind as my first choices, full flat/scandi, and would not want a hollow ground or shallow ground flat.
 
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treillw

treillw

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I'm having a hard time justifying $150 for a knife to pounds through logs in the off chance that I need to, although buying another toy sounds fun.

Really tempted to stick with the Mora. Convince me otherwise haha.
 

schwaf

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CO
I think batonning is a legit skill and has its place in bushcrafting. Many "experts" say otherwise. People never debate the benefits of splitting wood, especially in wet climates. Quartering logs make them burn better by exposing the dry core, and sharp corners catch flames better. People argue that batonning knives is stupid and to use a hatchet or axe instead. I agree, only if you have one you're willing to carry. I don't want to carry a 2 lb axe when I'm already carrying the rest of my camp on my back, plus a weeks worth of food. I'll opt instead to carry a slightly "heavier" knife instead (it's a couple ounces for a lot of capability, don't be a gram weenie). I've never broken a knife while batonning, and I've even tested them on nasty knotted logs. I find a knife much easier and safer to use most of the time too, especially for kindling.

A couple things to consider:

Your knife may be the single most important survival tool if you're knowledgeable and skilled enough to utilize it. Buy something of good quality and make sure it is sharp. A 4-5" blade is all you need to do most wood and hunting tasks.

Don't strike the handle, and make sure only the blade is touching the log, not the handle. If you're trying to baton logs too large and have the handle up against the log, you'll create a fulcrum and risk shearing the knife. Only use a wood baton. Never rocks. Try not to baton on top of rocks, or in to dirt. Any knife will chip and dull or break if used improperly.

A full tang knife, while heavier, is much more durable. If you're buying a knife with the intention of using it for batonning, get something full tang.

Not all grinds are created equal. A hollow grind and full flat grind will bind in wood much easier than scandi and convex grinds. I've used every grind I could try, and I think that convex grinds are superior in most applications.

Steel and heat treat matters. A lot. Super steels may be wasted in some regard, but I'd sooner take a blade made from CPM 3V from a reputable mfg and have confidence I'll never break it than some gerber mystery stainless steel.

My top choices in knives I would recommend to you. You won't go wrong with any of these:

Mora Garberg
Benchmade Leuku (3v)

If you have the money to invest, I think nothing beats Bark River knives. Hand finished convex grinds, top quality steel, and an unconditional lifetime sharpening and warranty. USA made with USA materials. They will fix or modify (or replace if necessary) any knife to your specs no questions or exceptions. Send it in and they will refinish the knife, literally as good as new. The performance is second to none and heirloom quality.
 
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treillw

treillw

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Best place to buy the leuku? Discounts?

Anywhere to get a kydex sheath? I think kydex would be lighter than leather??
 
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treillw

treillw

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I think batonning is a legit skill and has its place in bushcrafting. Many "experts" say otherwise. People never debate the benefits of splitting wood, especially in wet climates. Quartering logs make them burn better by exposing the dry core, and sharp corners catch flames better. People argue that batonning knives is stupid and to use a hatchet or axe instead. I agree, only if you have one you're willing to carry. I don't want to carry a 2 lb axe when I'm already carrying the rest of my camp on my back, plus a weeks worth of food. I'll opt instead to carry a slightly "heavier" knife instead (it's a couple ounces for a lot of capability, don't be a gram weenie). I've never broken a knife while batonning, and I've even tested them on nasty knotted logs. I find a knife much easier and safer to use most of the time too, especially for kindling.

A couple things to consider:

Your knife may be the single most important survival tool if you're knowledgeable and skilled enough to utilize it. Buy something of good quality and make sure it is sharp. A 4-5" blade is all you need to do most wood and hunting tasks.

Don't strike the handle, and make sure only the blade is touching the log, not the handle. If you're trying to baton logs too large and have the handle up against the log, you'll create a fulcrum and risk shearing the knife. Only use a wood baton. Never rocks. Try not to baton on top of rocks, or in to dirt. Any knife will chip and dull or break if used improperly.

A full tang knife, while heavier, is much more durable. If you're buying a knife with the intention of using it for batonning, get something full tang.

Not all grinds are created equal. A hollow grind and full flat grind will bind in wood much easier than scandi and convex grinds. I've used every grind I could try, and I think that convex grinds are superior in most applications.

Steel and heat treat matters. A lot. Super steels may be wasted in some regard, but I'd sooner take a blade made from CPM 3V from a reputable mfg and have confidence I'll never break it than some gerber mystery stainless steel.

My top choices in knives I would recommend to you. You won't go wrong with any of these:

Mora Garberg
Benchmade Leuku (3v)

If you have the money to invest, I think nothing beats Bark River knives. Hand finished convex grinds, top quality steel, and an unconditional lifetime sharpening and warranty. USA made with USA materials. They will fix or modify (or replace if necessary) any knife to your specs no questions or exceptions. Send it in and they will refinish the knife, literally as good as new. The performance is second to none and heirloom quality.
Which BRK would you suggest for my application? Thanks.
 

Lawnboi

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Mar 2, 2012
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North Central Wi
Lt wright outback or jessmuk C or genesis is what I normally carry. I’d highly reccomend the LT for the price, better finish and design over Bark river and the closest thing to a custom your going to get.

If I’m needing to process a lot a hatchet and saw.

Been screwed too many times with wet wood not to have an option to split. I agree with your thinking.

A plastic felling wedge will not work.

Bark river is not worth the money,
Esse is okay but will rust, and is pretty crude for the price, especially the handles, which your going to want If your going to process a bunch.

I’ll also say I don’t baton a lot, but it’s a good option to have. If I’m splitting a lot it’s with a hatchet.

And forget this lifetime knife sharpening bullshit. Every outdoorsman should learn and be proficient at sharpening a knife. Life skill that’s being forgotten for no reason.
 

Beendare

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May 6, 2014
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6,506
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In Traffic
Hey, if you wanna pack an axe in for me, be my guest. I'll give you the GPS coordinates.
Batoning is a glorified Youtube survival thing. Try Hacking away for awhile….and you will realize the futility.

That little Gerber hatchet splits wood like its nothing…its got to be close to the same weight of those big batoning knives or lighter….And way better.


FWIW, Ive been backpacking a tipi with stove into the backcountry for 15 years….a lightweight saw is all I need.

.
 

Marbles

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May 16, 2020
Messages
1,244
Location
AK
That little Gerber hatchet splits wood like its nothing…its got to be close to the same weight of those big batoning knives or lighter….And way better.

I have no argument that the hatchet works better than a midsized knife at splitting. However saying a 22.6 ounce hatchet is lighter than the the knives that are being discussed on this thread is comical. My knife and 13 inch blade saw combined wiegh less as caried than the Gerber alone.

Hatchets are pretty much a handicapped axe, a glorified YouTube tool that does very little well. I stopped using them at 13 or 14 as there was always a better tool for the job.
 

ElPollo

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
138
Batoning wood always seemed like an activity for people who are bored and are looking for an excuse to use their knife for an ill suited task. If you are not interested in earning your bushcraft merit badge, I would either saw smaller diameter wood that does not need to be split or bring a hatchet. If the act of splitting wood with a knife lowers your blood pressure, I wish luck in your quest.
I’m going to second this one. Most of the places I camp in the west, there is plenty of small branches that you don’t have to split or even use a saw on. Just break them up over your knee or a rock or log.

And the Mora looks like a single use tool. If you really must have a knife to baton with, get a simple 4” scandi blade bushcraft knife. You can baton pieces off the edges of thicker pieces with the smaller blade and still use the knife for other knife jobs. Scandi blades aren’t ideal slicers or butcher knives, but you can make one work for those jobs and for stuff that would kill a flat ground slicer.
 

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